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  1. #51
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    Yet again for BB7's!!

    I've tried Avid elixirs and Usagis. I like the BB7s with speed dial levers better than my hydraulics.

    I can work on them myself without making a greasy mess with oil all over the place. I can adjust them on the trail with a multi-tool... try that with hydraulics.

    They're easy to setup. Screw the pads in to the rotor, tighten the post mounts. set the cable screw, dial the pads back. Viola!

    They're genius in design because of their simplicity.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by connolm View Post
    Yet again for BB7's!!

    I've tried Avid elixirs and Usagis. I like the BB7s with speed dial levers better than my hydraulics.

    I can work on them myself without making a greasy mess with oil all over the place. I can adjust them on the trail with a multi-tool... try that with hydraulics.

    They're easy to setup. Screw the pads in to the rotor, tighten the post mounts. set the cable screw, dial the pads back. Viola!

    They're genius in design because of their simplicity.
    With hydraulics, you rarely if ever have to "adjust" anything. You adjust them once, and then you ride. I have yet to ever see a person with a catastrophic brake problem on the trail, but I have seen a billion people fiddling with mechanicals trying to get them just right. At some point, you will have to service hydraulics, but that's not adjusting. Avids being the exception, because those ****ing things are cursed. My current Magura and SLX brakes have been flawless.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneBadWagon View Post
    With hydraulics, you rarely if ever have to "adjust" anything. You adjust them once, and then you ride. I have yet to ever see a person with a catastrophic brake problem on the trail, but I have seen a billion people fiddling with mechanicals trying to get them just right. At some point, you will have to service hydraulics, but that's not adjusting. Avids being the exception, because those ****ing things are cursed. My current Magura and SLX brakes have been flawless.
    I had a catastrophic hydraulic brake failure on the trail. After a crash I found my hose had crimped right at the lever fitting, and was seeping brake fluid. The rest of the run was extremely sketchy, and that was the end of my day. That simply wouldn't have happened with a BB7.

    I don't see people with hydraulics fiddling with them, but I hear pretty regular complaints about the lever not feeling right, or it's rubbing, or contaminated pads. With the BB7 people are generally adjusting them (me included) because we can, and we're just trying to make them just that liiiiitle bit better.

    Yup, hydraulics generally don't need adjust, but heaven help you if they do.
    Last edited by bad mechanic; 11-02-2012 at 12:28 PM.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneBadWagon View Post
    With hydraulics, you rarely if ever have to "adjust" anything. You adjust them once, and then you ride. I have yet to ever see a person with a catastrophic brake problem on the trail, but I have seen a billion people fiddling with mechanicals trying to get them just right. At some point, you will have to service hydraulics, but that's not adjusting. Avids being the exception, because those ****ing things are cursed. My current Magura and SLX brakes have been flawless.
    I've ridden with people having issues with their hydros on the trail (or, more often, in the parking lot pre-ride) that could not be dealt with without some tools or a bleed kit. Granted, it is not a regular occurrence, but I have never seen an issue with bb7s that was not quickly remedied trailside.

    It is a valid point that when working properly, hydros are definitely lower maintenance than mechs. However, the fiddling you need to do with bb7s every few rides is really simple, quick, and requires no tools.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  5. #55
    sbd
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    Should I also use 4 wheels, 8 cylinders etc ?
    I understand what you trying to say, but a car is not a bicycle and vice versa.
    I found that BB7's are good brakes, althoug some hydraulic brakes are better.
    No but across all vehicles hydro has emerged as the best option. Are great mechs better than shitty hdros...yes. But a good hydro is better than any good mech. An xt is lighter, simpler, more powerful and offer better feedback than any mech including a bb7. So why dick around with a lamer alternative???

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbd View Post
    So why dick around with a lamer alternative???
    Why? Well.....

    A quick look over at Jenson USA:

    -$380 for Shimano XT Brakes with XT rotors.
    -$152 for BB7's (which come with rotors), Ripcord cables, and Speed dial 7 levers.

    So, $228 is why. And I beg to differ that the alternative here is "lame".
    Last edited by kapusta; 11-02-2012 at 05:38 PM.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbd View Post
    No but across all vehicles hydro has emerged as the best option. Are great mechs better than shitty hdros...yes. But a good hydro is better than any good mech. An xt is lighter, simpler, more powerful and offer better feedback than any mech including a bb7. So why dick around with a lamer alternative???
    Actually, air brakes are the best. Just not simple enough for cars, moto's or bikes. There is a reason semi's and trains use them still. Also- even though you are correct about XT's being lighter and more powerful (simpler, meh) BB7's are still a great brake. BB7 and XT trade points in the maintenance department-but for reliability and cost, the BB's take the prize.

    I have returned to the BB7 on my latest SS build. I sold my FS bike with all the gears, hydro and shock because I wanted to return to simple. BB7's fit the bill of simple while being cheap. I consider my riding strengths to be in the finesse department and have not felt the BB7 hindering me at all. I live in the desert and the only time my bike really sees water is if it rains (yeah right) so I have not had any issues to deal with as far as grit and moisture. Would I buy XT's? Yes, if they were as cheap as what I have now,but only to save some grams. And why concentrate on brakes? They only slow you down and unless you race DH, no one wins on braking ability alone.
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  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    You would be surprised how much better the BB7 are with the shim mod.
    pics!

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    Why? Well.....

    A quick look over at Jenson USA:

    -$380 for Shimano XT Brakes with XT rotors.
    -$152 for BB7's (which come with rotors), Ripcord cables, and Speed dial 7 levers.

    So, $228 is why. And I beg to differ that the alternative here is "lame".
    Bluesky cycling often has deals on XT brakes for closer to $220 a set
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  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    Bluesky cycling often has deals on XT brakes for closer to $220 a set
    You still need to buy rotors.

    And you can also find bb7s for less as well.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    You still need to buy rotors.

    And you can also find bb7s for less as well.
    I have seen deals with the non ice tech rotors for that price.

    Several European based online shops have SLX brake sets for very good prices.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    I have seen deals with the non ice tech rotors for that price.

    Several European based online shops have SLX brake sets for very good prices.
    I'll believe XT brakes with rotors for $110 per end when I see it. Heck, I might buy them as well.

    In any event, the point was that there is a large price difference. If we are now talking about comparing screaming good deals, I've seen bb7's for $45, Ripcord for $22, and Levers for $12, so thats about $124.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  13. #63
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    My only real beef with XTs is the strong tendency for one piston to be dominant, and keep self adjusting out towards the rotor, while the the other piston stays nearly fully retracted into the caliper.

    For me, in the rear especially, this results in the need for easy but fairly frequent tweaking. At least as much as the old Avid mechs took to adjust as the pads wore.
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  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Realslowww View Post
    I am not going to post a picture,shim the cable out where it attaches to the arm so it is longer, so it is like using a longer wrench to loosen a bolt.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    pics!
    Dont hold your breath Bill, he already refused to post a picture....

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by FLMike View Post
    Dont hold your breath Bill, he already refused to post a picture....
    Exactly. He's talked about this mod previously, but for the life of me, I can't figure out how a washer is going to fit where he says.

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    I had a catastrophic hydraulic brake failure on the trail. After a crash I found my hose had crimped right at the lever fitting, and was seeping brake fluid. The rest of the run was extremely sketchy, and that was the end of my day. That simply wouldn't have happened with a BB7.

    I don't see people with hydraulics fiddling with them, but I hear pretty regular complaints about the lever not feeling right, or it's rubbing, or contaminated pads. With the BB7 people are generally adjusting them (me included) because we can, and we're just trying to make them just that liiiiitle bit better.

    Yup, hydraulics generally don't need adjust, but heaven help you if they do.
    I'm in no way claiming that it doesn't happen, I'm quite certain that it does. I haven't seen it. I do know that my BB7's irritate me, as did my last set. They're a fine brake, but always seem to require adjustment, and it probably bugs me most of all that you can't really turn the inside red knob by hand with the wheel on the bike on mine. I'm also not running compressionless housing on my Unit.

    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    I've ridden with people having issues with their hydros on the trail (or, more often, in the parking lot pre-ride) that could not be dealt with without some tools or a bleed kit. Granted, it is not a regular occurrence, but I have never seen an issue with bb7s that was not quickly remedied trailside.

    It is a valid point that when working properly, hydros are definitely lower maintenance than mechs. However, the fiddling you need to do with bb7s every few rides is really simple, quick, and requires no tools.
    With the exception of some old juicy brakes I've used, literally every other set has been 100% set and forget. That includes some jankety Tektro (deore copies), SLX, Magura Louise BATs, and a couple others that I can't think of. I wouldn't ride AVID hydraulic disks if you paid me. All of my buddies who work in shops have eventually had their AVID hydraulic brakes warrantied so many times that they're now riding XX brakes, and they all suffer the same maladies.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneBadWagon View Post
    Exactly. He's talked about this mod previously, but for the life of me, I can't figure out how a washer is going to fit where he says.
    It may require a longer bolt but I can see how putting a couple washers under the cable on the end of the lever would help leverage. But, this will also require more lever travel for the same pad travel. I sketched up a pic of what I think he's trying to say...
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  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ufdah View Post
    It may require a longer bolt but I can see how putting a couple washers under the cable on the end of the lever would help leverage. But, this will also require more lever travel for the same pad travel. I sketched up a pic of what I think he's trying to say...
    I probably should have phrased that better. I find that more often than not I can't get the pads close enough to the rotor without rubbing to get the feel that I want. I would need a different leverage rate brake lever to enjoy that mod. I guess that's what the SD levers are for.

  19. #69
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    The sd levers are fabulous and dirt cheap, highly recommend them with the bb7. I can't see why one would need to mod the caliper considering you can adjust leverage at the lever... With 203's on the front and the leverage dial all the way in the brakes are way too powerful as it is...
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  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneBadWagon View Post
    ... I do know that my BB7's irritate me, as did my last set. They're a fine brake, but always seem to require adjustment, and it probably bugs me most of all that you can't really turn the inside red knob by hand with the wheel on the bike on mine...
    That is true. I'm a pro-BB7 bigot, and if there's one thing I would change it would be not needing to have the wheel off or a torqx wrench to adjust that side. At least the newest generation of them have a torqx head in the middle...

    I was riding today and it came to be technical descent time. My rear brake had loosened up, needed the dreaded fiddling. I actually made the futile effort to tighten that inside ride knob by hand without taking the wheel off. It was obvious that there was no way that would work so I took my multi-tool out of the seat bag and took care of business. I bet I was stuck finishing that task for MORE THEN 45 SECONDS. Ridiculous.

    The previous version of BB7 didn't even have a torqx option, that actually was a problem. I've gotten rid of all of the calipers of that style I had.

    Hey peoples, Speeddial levers are good. Or at least OK. But God help me, don't you know that XTR v-brake levers have a little plastic plug that you can knock out, and once you do there's an adjustment for cable pull ratio (like the Speeddial adjustment)?

    XTR levers and BB7s are the shiznit my friends.
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  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    That is true. I'm a pro-BB7 bigot, and if there's one thing I would change it would be not needing to have the wheel off or a torqx wrench to adjust that side. At least the newest generation of them have a torqx head in the middle...

    I was riding today and it came to be technical descent time. My rear brake had loosened up, needed the dreaded fiddling. I actually made the futile effort to tighten that inside ride knob by hand without taking the wheel off. It was obvious that there was no way that would work so I took my multi-tool out of the seat bag and took care of business. I bet I was stuck finishing that task for MORE THEN 45 SECONDS. Ridiculous.

    The previous version of BB7 didn't even have a torqx option, that actually was a problem. I've gotten rid of all of the calipers of that style I had.

    Hey peoples, Speeddial levers are good. Or at least OK. But God help me, don't you know that XTR v-brake levers have a little plastic plug that you can knock out, and once you do there's an adjustment for cable pull ratio (like the Speeddial adjustment)?

    XTR levers and BB7s are the shiznit my friends.
    I never realized the inboard adjusters were giving people problems.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  22. #72
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    You can break off some of the "teeth" of the inboard pad adjuster to make them easier to turn. Did that with an old "N type" that I had. But alas I had to stop using them because the return springs had gotten weaker.

    As for levers, I've used Paul's and SD7s but the best feeling ones were the cheapo FR-5s. Of course feel is subjective :-)

    As is brake preference.

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    I can't exactly speak to your point as I've never owned hydraulics of any kind. I've been riding BB7s for 10+ years with Avid Ultimates. When I bought the Ultimates ($100 less than they are now) from Speedgoat, the description said something like "If engineers from another planet who didn't know anything about bikes saw these, they'd say "Nice".

    Those levers are half the reason I keep riding BB7s. The other half that BB7s perform really well. And the third half is they're 1/3 the price of cheap hydraulics. That's money I spend on better hubs or some other upgrade.

    .
    I run SD-7 levers with BB7 brakes. I'm perfectly satisfied especially since I can adjust the leverage between the front and back brakes to suit my needs

    Quick tips for ANY bike .... run a larger rotor in the front then you do in the back. Effective braking is done primarily with the front brake so to keep your fingers from getting sore, use a larger rotor for more breaking force.

    Though, I love the SD7 levers. I'm also aware that Shimano Servo-Wave levers are very effective as they ramp up the leverage in the lever through the lever stroke. So you get high travel when first depressing the lever to make contact and higher clamping force at the point of pad contact. If I ever go Hydro, I will go with XT brakes. This is coming from a guy who is married to SRAM shifters and derailleurs.

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ufdah View Post
    It may require a longer bolt but I can see how putting a couple washers under the cable on the end of the lever would help leverage. But, this will also require more lever travel for the same pad travel. I sketched up a pic of what I think he's trying to say...
    You are also increase the cable angle which will increase the friction in the cable travel and make it less likely for the pads to fully retract. Laugh if you like but I've resorted to inserting a spring in the cable run from the boss to the cable mount to insure full pad retraction.

    I've also used some Hayes mechanicals where the angle was just TOO much between the boss and the lever arm and pad retraction was a problem that required TWO springs in order to remedy.

    SD7 levers are cheap and will increase the leverage without causing extra cable friction.

  25. #75
    willtsmith_nwi
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbd View Post
    There's a reason all cars and motorcycles use hydraulic brakes. Step away from the 8 track and get an iPod.
    Yes, technically ....
    Well the reason is that hydro cable can be routed anywhere at any angle without preventing the system from working so long as you don't crimp the cable. It is also a crucial factor in engine enhanced braking.

    And, financially ....
    The cost of hydro is also more easily absorbed with high economies of scale in auto and motorcyle production. This as well as the fact that the increased cost is much less a factor overall when the minimum retail cost of a vehicle is around $14,000 rather than $75.

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