Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 110
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    446

    Steel Jones Spaceframe

    Jeff has just blogged a Steel Spaceframe - some photos here: http://jonesbikes.com/blog/?p=1308#comment-181

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wannabeRacer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,107
    Woooho... this means I can finally buy a Jeff

  3. #3
    Harmonius Wrench
    Reputation: Guitar Ted's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,220
    Interesting.


    I will be curious to hear how much that frame/fork/bar weigh. That's a lot of steel tubing there.
    Riden' an Smilin'
    Guitar Ted

    Blog
    RidingGravel.com

  4. #4
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,462
    Quote Originally Posted by Guitar Ted
    Interesting.


    I will be curious to hear how much that frame/fork/bar weigh. That's a lot of steel tubing there.
    it's a lot of straight gauge steel tubing at that.

    I'm interested in riding one but I really think space frame bikes are a whole lot of hype without any pudding.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,988
    Looks interesting. Also, check out the bars. Looks like the steerer tube is actaully part of the bars!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    2,911
    Finally, someone has figured out how to make a fork and bars out of steel!

  7. #7
    Spooooon!
    Reputation: Hairllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    674
    Quote Originally Posted by craigsj
    Finally, someone has figured out how to make a fork and bars out of steel!
    I've had both for quite some time. Granted they're not of the Jones variety, but steel bars and forks are out there.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    9,647
    Quote Originally Posted by Hairllama
    I've had both for quite some time. Granted they're not of the Jones variety, but steel bars and forks are out there.
    don't mind him.... that was actually just craigsj's ever-present cynicism and sarcasm.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Climber999's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    720
    I also question the wisdom behind this project.
    The shape of the Spaceframe was tailored for Ti; replicating it in steel, 1:1, does not make sense.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,988
    Quote Originally Posted by Climber999
    I also question the wisdom behind this project.
    The shape of the Spaceframe was tailored for Ti; replicating it in steel, 1:1, does not make sense.
    Who says he replicated it 1:1? I'm sure he tailered the bends, tubing diameters and wall thickness for the new material. And obviously he has been testing it for quite some time before even mentioning it on his blog.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: PNW Freeride's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by wannabeRacer
    Woooho... this means I can finally buy a Jeff
    Agreed .
    Im also wondering about weight and the affect of swiching material.

  12. #12
    ogarajef@luther.edu
    Reputation: 1strongone1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,387
    The ti version sucks to ride, I am sure adding 4 pounds to the design makes it even more worthless.
    "RIDE IT LIKE YOU HATE IT"

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Climber999's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    720
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny
    Who says he replicated it 1:1? I'm sure he tailered the bends, tubing diameters and wall thickness for the new material. And obviously he has been testing it for quite some time before even mentioning it on his blog.
    Don't kid me. You cannot curve butted steel (it will buckle) and curving heavy tubes would not affect their ride properties.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Climber999's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    720
    Quote Originally Posted by 1strongone1
    The ti version sucks to ride, I am sure adding 4 pounds to the design makes it even more worthless.
    Do you have first hand experience? I would love you if could elaborate on the poor ride.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    270
    Quote Originally Posted by Guitar Ted
    I will be curious to hear how much that frame/fork/bar weigh. That's a lot of steel tubing there.
    He posted earlier on his blog that the steel truss fork weighs less than a normal unicrown steel fat fork.
    Too many bikes, not enough time.

  16. #16
    Needed Less ~ Did More
    Reputation: Singlespeedpunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,008
    Climber999, yes you can bend butted tube. Just because you can't does not make it impossible.

    SSP
    "Put any one on one of these singlespeed bikes and they could not help but have fun"
    -
    Otis Guy talking about klunkers c1976

  17. #17
    ogarajef@luther.edu
    Reputation: 1strongone1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,387
    Quote Originally Posted by Climber999
    Do you have first hand experience? I would love you if could elaborate on the poor ride.
    I have put many miles on one and I don't like it. If you like your handlebars an inch or two above your saddle then it may be ok, for me it feels like I am driving a bus through the singletrack. I really wanted to buy one, at one time, luckily a friend of mine beat me to the punch. Everyone that actually owns one, is going to like it. They are unique and expensive, you are forced to like it.
    "RIDE IT LIKE YOU HATE IT"

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,988
    Quote Originally Posted by Climber999
    Don't kid me. You cannot curve butted steel (it will buckle) and curving heavy tubes would not affect their ride properties.
    Who is kidding who here? First, I never claimed he was bending butted steel tubing. But then again, why do you think butted tubing can't be bent? Of course it can, it just depends on how much you want to bend it and what the wall thickness is in the butted section. Must of Jeff's bends are pretty big diameter, no sharp bends, so I'm sure it can be done.

    Secondly, bending heavy tubes (which I guarantee is not what Jeff is doing) most certainly will affect their ride properties.

    Here is what I think Jeff has done: Select the proper diameter and wall thickness tubing to give him the leteral stiffness and the vertical compliance he wants. And then he's been testing it all summer to see if it performs like a Jones should. And I guarantee he has a notebook full of comments and changes he will make if he ever sells them.

    Do your homework before posting such nonesense.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Climber999's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    720
    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny
    Who is kidding who here? First, I never claimed he was bending butted steel tubing. But then again, why do you think butted tubing can't be bent? Of course it can, it just depends on how much you want to bend it and what the wall thickness is in the butted section. Must of Jeff's bends are pretty big diameter, no sharp bends, so I'm sure it can be done.

    Secondly, bending heavy tubes (which I guarantee is not what Jeff is doing) most certainly will affect their ride properties.

    Here is what I think Jeff has done: Select the proper diameter and wall thickness tubing to give him the leteral stiffness and the vertical compliance he wants. And then he's been testing it all summer to see if it performs like a Jones should. And I guarantee he has a notebook full of comments and changes he will make if he ever sells them.

    Do your homework before posting such nonesense.
    Well, one may retort that speculating like you do, is a bit more nonsense than coming up with statements based on research. However, we are all friends here, so I take back my comment about 'kidding me'. An apology is extended.

    That's what I know:
    When I inquire about bending butted tubes with James from Black Sheep he advised against it, pointing out it may not withstand the pressure. He suggested restricting bending to straight gauge tubes. Jones may be immensely more talented than James (which I personally doubt). or as you suggest, it may depend on the nature of the curve.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wannabeRacer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,107
    I been thinking about the price and weight also? uhmmm..... I may not be able to afford it and the frame might weight 3kg not including the fork?

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,988
    Quote Originally Posted by Climber999
    Well, one may retort that speculating like you do, is a bit more nonsense than coming up with statements based on research. However, we are all friends here, so I take back my comment about 'kidding me'. An apology is extended.

    That's what I know:
    When I inquire about bending butted tubes with James from Black Sheep he advised against it, pointing out it may not withstand the pressure. He suggested restricting bending to straight gauge tubes. Jones may be immensely more talented than James (which I personally doubt). or as you suggest, it may depend on the nature of the curve.
    You are totally correct, we are both (all?) speculating about this. No apology required, and I hope I didn't offend you with my above comments.

    James is certainly a very talented frame builder and bender of tubing. As a matter of fact, I am riding a custom Ti Black Sheep with LOTS of bends and absolutely love it, bent Ti fork and all! But, if any bike could lure me away from my Black Sheep, it could only be a Jones Ti spaceframe.

    My guess is he is using straight gage tubing of whatever wall thickness he thought up to the task. I know, bold statement there! I'm sure more details will come at some point.

    Mark

  22. #22
    aka baycat
    Reputation: Ryan G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    8,484
    Jones needs to team up with Lynskey and we can have curved, twisted steel tubes

    The SpaceHelix in 3d!

  23. #23
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,462
    Quote Originally Posted by Climber999
    Don't kid me. You cannot curve butted steel (it will buckle) and curving heavy tubes would not affect their ride properties.
    when did you start building bikes?

  24. #24
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: Walt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,093

    Butting is irrelevant

    Just FYI, guys:

    Whether a tube is butted or not is irrelevant to whether it can be successfully/safely bent. Thinner tubing is more difficult to bend than thicker tubing, likewise smaller diameter tubes are easier to bend than larger ones. Small radius is harder than large, since the outside of the bend has to stretch more (and ends up thinner) as the radius decreases.

    Butted steel and ti tubes are typically not bent because the tubing tends to be relatively thin in the center sections, and most main triangle tubes are also pretty large diameter (ie, >1"), meaning that it's very hard to do and end up with something you want to use for a bike frame. In theory, however, it can be done.

    The curved tubes on Jeff's frame are obviously made from ~5/8" straightgauge 4130 or something very similar. There's no butted tubing available in this sort of diameter/length for bikes (or anything else that I know of). Most likely it's .035" or .049" wall. That would be relatively easy to work with and plenty strong. And no, it's probably not light, but if you're after light, you don't do any tube bending anyway - the shortest distance between two points, and all that...

    -Walt

    Quote Originally Posted by Singlespeedpunk
    Climber999, yes you can bend butted tube. Just because you can't does not make it impossible.

    SSP
    Waltworks Custom Bicycles
    Park City, UT USA
    www.waltworks.com
    waltworks.com/blog/
    instagram.com/waltworks/

  25. #25
    Stokeless Asshat
    Reputation: jeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,322
    Finally, the voice of reason.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  26. #26
    Rigid in Evergreen
    Reputation: topmounter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,538
    Thread killer


    LOL

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    446
    Nice to hear from someone who actually knows what they're talking about!

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Climber999's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    720
    Quote Originally Posted by Walt
    Just FYI, guys:

    Whether a tube is butted or not is irrelevant to whether it can be successfully/safely bent. Thinner tubing is more difficult to bend than thicker tubing, likewise smaller diameter tubes are easier to bend than larger ones. Small radius is harder than large, since the outside of the bend has to stretch more (and ends up thinner) as the radius decreases.

    Butted steel and ti tubes are typically not bent because the tubing tends to be relatively thin in the center sections, and most main triangle tubes are also pretty large diameter (ie, >1"), meaning that it's very hard to do and end up with something you want to use for a bike frame. In theory, however, it can be done.

    The curved tubes on Jeff's frame are obviously made from ~5/8" straightgauge 4130 or something very similar. There's no butted tubing available in this sort of diameter/length for bikes (or anything else that I know of). Most likely it's .035" or .049" wall. That would be relatively easy to work with and plenty strong. And no, it's probably not light, but if you're after light, you don't do any tube bending anyway - the shortest distance between two points, and all that...

    -Walt
    Thanks Walt, that's quite edifying.

    I must say a feel somewhat vindicated, although I have confused between butted and thin-walled tubes.

    One question still remain in my mind; perhaps Walt can respond; are there any tubes sufficiently thick to be bent?

  29. #29
    Northern Aggressor
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    708
    I'm pretty sure you just got served, not vindicated.

    Quote Originally Posted by Climber999
    Thanks Walt, that's quite edifying.

    I must say a feel somewhat vindicated, although I have confused between butted and thin-walled tubes.

    One question still remain in my mind; perhaps Walt can respond; are there any tubes sufficiently thick to be bent?

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Climber999's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    720
    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Chocula
    I'm pretty sure you just got served, not vindicated.
    No,I was stating butted tubes cannot be bent, under the implicit assumption their middle sections are too thin for such operation. Walt verified exactly that. Q.E.D.

  31. #31
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: Walt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,093

    Yes and no.

    The thinnest large-diameter steel tubing that I have seen bent on a consistent basis for bikes is 1.125"x.028" straightgauge (so .7mm thick tube walls). And that's a large-radius bend (ie, Coconino style toptube).

    The *thickest* commonly used butted steel bike tubing (say, True Temper Verus) is significantly thinner in the center section (.6mm, or ~.024"). I don't know anyone that bends main triangle tubes like that, let alone higher-end heat treated or air hardening tubing (which gets down to .4mm center sections).

    In ti, most butted tubing is .6mm/.024" at the center as well (it doesn't get any thinner to my knowledge) and I've never heard of anyone bending that. That's not to say nobody has done it, but I'd be pretty surprised.

    .6mm is regularly bent for seatstays (admitttedly, I only use stuff that thin for 'cross bikes, not mountain bikes), but those are usually pretty small diameter (16mm or smaller, usually), which makes things much easier. Many builders (myself included) struggle with getting consistent good bends even for seatstays.

    Hope that helps.

    -Walt

    Quote Originally Posted by Climber999
    Thanks Walt, that's quite edifying.

    I must say a feel somewhat vindicated, although I have confused between butted and thin-walled tubes.

    One question still remain in my mind; perhaps Walt can respond; are there any tubes sufficiently thick to be bent?
    Waltworks Custom Bicycles
    Park City, UT USA
    www.waltworks.com
    waltworks.com/blog/
    instagram.com/waltworks/

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikeny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,988
    Quote Originally Posted by Walt
    The thinnest large-diameter steel tubing that I have seen bent on a consistent basis for bikes is 1.125"x.028" straightgauge (so .7mm thick tube walls). And that's a large-radius bend (ie, Coconino style toptube).

    The *thickest* commonly used butted steel bike tubing (say, True Temper Verus) is significantly thinner in the center section (.6mm, or ~.024"). I don't know anyone that bends main triangle tubes like that, let alone higher-end heat treated or air hardening tubing (which gets down to .4mm center sections).

    In ti, most butted tubing is .6mm/.024" at the center as well (it doesn't get any thinner to my knowledge) and I've never heard of anyone bending that. That's not to say nobody has done it, but I'd be pretty surprised.

    .6mm is regularly bent for seatstays (admitttedly, I only use stuff that thin for 'cross bikes, not mountain bikes), but those are usually pretty small diameter (16mm or smaller, usually), which makes things much easier. Many builders (myself included) struggle with getting consistent good bends even for seatstays.

    Hope that helps.

    -Walt
    All good info, Walt, thanks. But I'm starting to think that this discussion is moot anyway. For this type of bike, I think you need to use straight gage tubing to get consistent compliance from the frame. In other words, the whole idea of the space frame is vertical compliance and lateral stiffenss. Using butted tubing would cause the tube to flex more in the thinner section and less in the thicker section. I would think that is not a good thing for the frames lifespan. Also, as Walt mentioned earlier, there is no butter tubing available in the lengths and diameters Jeff is using.

    Climber999: You mention not knowing the difference between butted and thin walled tubing. Thin walled tubing is just that, it has a consistent thin wall through the whole length of the tube. Butted tubing has a thicker wall at one end and a thinner wall for the rest of the tube. Double butted tubing has thicker wall at both ends and thinner wall in the center section. Walt please clarrify if I didn't get it exactly right.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OmaHaq's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    639
    Very educational thread toward the end. Thanks!

  34. #34
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation: Walt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,093

    Yes.

    Yes, it's moot - Jeff is clearly using straightgauge for that frame (and I would guess, for his ti frames as well). I can't speak to the "consistent compliance" part - I do not build this type of frame, and have never ridden one, so I don't know what Jeff's thought process is when designing/building. Bottom line: it's straightgauge. For the record, that's not a dig against it. I use straightgauge for all kinds of things, all the time, as does every other framebuilder on the planet.

    Most builders refer to *any* tubing with varying wall thicknesses (thick/thin, thick/thin/thick, thicker/thin/thick) as "butted". The "double" and "triple" butted tubes you commonly hear about are just thick/thin/thick, with the "triple butted" being slightly thicker at one thick section than at the other (for example .9mm/.6mm/.8mm).

    -Walt

    Quote Originally Posted by bikeny
    All good info, Walt, thanks. But I'm starting to think that this discussion is moot anyway. For this type of bike, I think you need to use straight gage tubing to get consistent compliance from the frame. In other words, the whole idea of the space frame is vertical compliance and lateral stiffenss. Using butted tubing would cause the tube to flex more in the thinner section and less in the thicker section. I would think that is not a good thing for the frames lifespan. Also, as Walt mentioned earlier, there is no butter tubing available in the lengths and diameters Jeff is using.

    Climber999: You mention not knowing the difference between butted and thin walled tubing. Thin walled tubing is just that, it has a consistent thin wall through the whole length of the tube. Butted tubing has a thicker wall at one end and a thinner wall for the rest of the tube. Double butted tubing has thicker wall at both ends and thinner wall in the center section. Walt please clarrify if I didn't get it exactly right.
    Waltworks Custom Bicycles
    Park City, UT USA
    www.waltworks.com
    waltworks.com/blog/
    instagram.com/waltworks/

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    446
    I hope Jeff doesn't mind me quoting from his blog:

    "The ride is very similar to the Ti version. The geometry is the same so the balance points and handling are the same. The bike just has a little more mass to it and it’s a little stiffer. I did use smaller tubes on this frame than on the Ti frame since steel is stiffer.

    The H-Bar Loop is welded directly to the steel steerer and the star nut is in the bottom. Headset adjustment is done at the lower fork clamp.

    I never painted this one. I just wanted to see how it would ride. Maybe I’ll paint it later. I’m riding the second one now and it’s black.
    JJ"

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: D.F.L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,839
    The other problem with bends in butted tubing is that thin-walled material, especially in larger diameters, requires an INTERNAL mandrel, in addition to the customary external piece. The internal mandrel maintains the tubes cross-section (eliminates collapsing/buckling).

    If you're trying to bend the thin, center section, you cannot insert the mandrel, because the end butts have a smaller I.D. than the center.

    but enough of this sexy talk...

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: boomn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    9,647
    Quote Originally Posted by D.F.L.
    The other problem with bends in butted tubing is that thin-walled material, especially in larger diameters, requires an INTERNAL mandrel, in addition to the customary external piece. The internal mandrel maintains the tubes cross-section (eliminates collapsing/buckling).

    If you're trying to bend the thin, center section, you cannot insert the mandrel, because the end butts have a smaller I.D. than the center.

    but enough of this sexy talk...
    i've heard of sand-packing and other non-traditional "mandrels"... are these not effective enough on thin tubing, or are they not used because of other practical drawbacks?

  38. #38
    banned
    Reputation: <-meathucker->'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    102
    My biggest questions are a) price & b) wait time. I would love to have a ti spaceframe, but am not willing to pay that amount AND have to wait for years to get it; conversely, I would pay less for a steel version if the ride qualities were the same BUT not if it was a similar wait time. Maybe doing this bike in steel will allow him to contract another builder to do the work like what he did with Merlin?

  39. #39
    Geordie biker
    Reputation: saltyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    1,376
    i asked this week about buying a jones 2fat snow bike but he has stopped production, he is very busy trying to build peoples custom Ti frames at the moment, the waiting list is high, there must be some backlog to clear i bet.

    the steel bike will be expensive still i reckon, its still a custom frame after all, a typical hardtail steel frame to fit is around £1,000 ($1,500) typically, so i guess a steel spaceframe will be double that.
    2014 milage so far - 2,485
    www.ukfatbikes.co.uk

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    421

    "In Jeff We Truss"

    If JJ's got enough time and resources his steel birdcage should work pretty darn well, and without a major weight gain. With so many tubes, diameters, and bends the tuning variables do seem endless though!

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    393

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TheGenTwo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    286
    Quote Originally Posted by ftajiri

    My first impression was that that was a lot of money for a bike without any "bling-steel"; 853 tubing and its other similar grades

    I would be interested to observe the popularity on this one . Personally, I like it because I am inclined favorably to the look and hype of the Jones .

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: D_Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    686
    Great that he's found a way to bring the price down, but it would be nice to see some weights with all that 4130.

    Also be cool when he moves beyond the current "Model T" phase: and color and size you want as long as it's black and 23".

  44. #44
    Rigid in Evergreen
    Reputation: topmounter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,538
    "slight" weight penalty

  45. #45
    banned
    Reputation: <-meathucker->'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    102
    Quote Originally Posted by ftajiri
    Oh yes...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Steel Jones Spaceframe-really20want.jpg  


  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CJones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    427
    The Jones website has just been updated with the new frames and bars:

    http://jonesbikes.com/production_framesets.html

    http://jonesbikes.com/h-bar.html

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    446
    I can see some cut loop bars in my not too distant future

    And maybe a steel diamond for the hell of it!

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    645
    I don't get it. Am I the only one?

  49. #49
    Just Ride!
    Reputation: kustomz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,122
    He seems to have very good price points on frame and forks, too bad there are no other sizes in stock.

  50. #50
    Newt Guy
    Reputation: FrostyStruthers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    833
    Can I put a 120mm fork on it?

    Yes, steel is most certainly stronger than aluminum EVERY time.
    ~Frosty Struthers

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •