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  1. #1
    I like rigid MTB.
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    New question here. Rustproofing a steel 29er ... Need some help.

    I would like to do some rustproofing the internal of the steel frame. I see all other tubing are fully sealed except the seat tube, BB and the head tube.

    What to use/how to apply and how to approach the issue ?

    *My 26er is Ti and I have no such problem. I try to avoid using the steel bike in winter and in wet condition.

    Thanks....
    Last edited by edle; 01-31-2013 at 12:05 AM. Reason: add info.

  2. #2
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    I wouldn't worry about it, I can't see the inside of the frame anyway. If you have some super expensive custom frame, then you could put some frame saver or boiled linseed oil in there and shake it around.

  3. #3
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
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    Quote Originally Posted by edle View Post
    I would like to do some rustproofing the internal of the steel frame. I see all other tubing are fully sealed except the seat tube, BB and the head tube.
    For a steel bike it's never a bad idea to have the frame treated with Frame Saver to help inhibit corrosion. Moisture will get in even if you think it is sealed up.

    Frame assembly (welding/brazing) requires a way for heated gasses to escape from inside the tubes and I've not heard of these holes being sealed up afterwards (could be done, just haven't heard of it).

    Frame Saver is sprayed in, and dries up in a coating that helps the whole thing fight rust. It dries up firm so that it won't migrate off the tubes.

    I'll note that even WITH that done to my Niner MCR by a professional frame builder, before I built up the bike, I have obvious internal rust under the paint in places ... gusset edges, etc.

  4. #4
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    Internal Frame Coating w/Spray Nozzle | Eastwood

    used this on my old nissan pathfinder. works great, easy to apply and relatively cheap

  5. #5
    hispanic mechanic
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    Another product that works well is Boeshield in the spray bottle. Just like with Frame Saver, use the "straw" that comes with the can to spray into all of the tubes, vent holes work well. I put paper towels in the BB, head tube, and seat tube, then turn the frame in the stand every few hours.
    It's not really that big of a deal, unless you ride in wet, nasty conditions a lot. I've seen plenty of 20-30 year-old steel road bikes ridden in places like San Diego with no major problems.

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  6. #6
    Spring! Spring! Spring!
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    I <3 boesheild.

  7. #7
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    I've used FrameSaver with good results on a couple bikes now. Just get a roll of paper towels and follow the instructions on the can. Make sure you clean your BB threads afterwards. I used denatured alcohol (Cause I had some) to clean the overspray off the paint.

  8. #8
    I like rigid MTB.
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    Thanks for the great info. I already ordered a can of Frame Saver for my steel 29er. Up here it is wet and salty stilling the winter time.

  9. #9
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    I give all of my steel bikes a shot of rustproofing. I use some stuff I found around here, seems to be lanolin based. It's messy so I only give it a small shot in each tube. Not supposed to dry out and supposed to creep into joints etc.
    I leave my bikes in the car a lot and I found that steel tools left in the car go rusty.

  10. #10
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    Just shot my new Pugsley frame and fork with Boeshield and did the wife's new Fargo earlier in the week. Hers was prebuilt so some things had to come off first. Stuff seems to work well.

    My Fargo got its frame thoroughly soaked last year with a spray lube from Autozone, this as it was being built. I'll probably go after it with Boeshield come spring.

  11. #11
    1*14*29*2.1 & 1*1*29*2.4
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    one other thing I would suggest, especially if you have powder coat. Spray or brush the stops and any brazed points with rust protection, or similar. I had nasty rust develop around these points from voids in paint work.

  12. #12
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    AMSOIL MP Heavy-Duty Metal Protector
    This looks, smells and acts like frame saver and yet is about half price per OZ.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ericF600 View Post
    Internal Frame Coating w/Spray Nozzle | Eastwood

    used this on my old nissan pathfinder. works great, easy to apply and relatively cheap
    Looks like the product I used.

    Tectyl ML from Valvoline.
    The flexible tube nozzle fits in most frametubes, the smaller "straw" fits in the small holes drilled in the seatstays.
    Apply generous, turn frame a few times slowly, and let it leak out for a few days.
    Works best in summer or room temperature.
    Belgian beer and Scotch whisky.

  14. #14
    I Ride for Donuts
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    Sometimes when I have the seatpost removed or the BB taken apart, I'll shoot some WD40 into the tubes (have to use the little red hose thingy on the WD40 can to get it in the little holes inside the BB shell.

    That said, I grew up jumping my steel BMX bikes into the lake off of a ramp, and all I ever did was lube the chain every few months Never had a rust issue. They don't use salt on the roads around here though...
    You have no excuse for driving to work
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  15. #15
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    There is a product called ACF 50 that they use in the aerospace industry, works really well! A buddy who was an airplane mechanic told be about it 20+ years ago back when I rode steel bikes.

    Lear Chemical Research Corporation

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by thasingletrackmastah View Post
    Looks like the product I used.

    Tectyl ML from Valvoline.
    I used to live in NZ (where they measure the rainfall in Meters and not Centimeters).
    That Tectyl was a very popular product for rust prevention in the automotive industry. I'd happily buy/use it for my bike frame. Not sure if its available here in Australia but now I've been reminded, I'll start looking for it.

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