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  1. #1
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    Ripmo or Switchblade

    Hey All-

    I'm looking to replace my Gen1 Pivot Mach 6. I've always loved the DW-link, but it's time for something new, and leaning towards a 29. I climb everything, but still want to be able to deal with steep, chunky rocky rooty stuff with confidence and balance playful with stability. The old Pivot did this really well.

    Does anyone have time on the both the switchblade and the Ripmo? I've demoed the Switchblade a bit, but haven't gotten to take out a Ripmo yet.

    My impression of the switchblade so far is that it's quite playful with the short stays, and still feels pretty snappy up front on more XC style trails. I have only ridden it in 29 w/ the 17mm cup, which should make it a bit slacker than the spec.

  2. #2
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    I spent time on the Switchblade a bit. Really nice bike tho the seat angle isn't ideal imo once it's up a bit. I'm a taller guy so this was magnified but not has bad as a Hightower (overrated bike) . I didnt like that the frame was so heavy too when I wasn't to use it for Enduro bashing all the time. I ended up building a custom Rocky Mountain Instinct (140mm) with a fox 36 and dpx2. LOVE It. Better balanced and climbs so well. Lots of fun and super light as the frame is over a lb lighter and I'm not dealing with super boost complexities. I easily had custom carbon wheelset built with dtb240s i29rims for under 1k$ to go with it. Seat angle is excellent and don't think that the Ride9 is a gimmick. I just raced a DH race with my 6yro (nw cup) and being able to slacken it out was really nice.

    There is a guy in Rocky forums that demoed all of these and settled on the Instinct BC over Ripmo. He said they were similar but the Instinct felt more stable.

    You'd want to demo them as much as possible. I'd skip the blade just because of superboost and dated geometry. Hard to pass on Ripmo and it will have all the marketing hype too. Seems like Ibis does DWlink the best. For me tho, both the blade and Ripmo are a bit too much bike for a 29er. I also think the Ripmo is too long for regular riders.

  3. #3
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    I demo'd the SB and didn't really like it when climbing. Downhill, it was fine, though didn't blow me away. But then again, I'm not an all out DH type, so that factors into my perception.

    I was very interested in the Ripmo because after demoing the Transition Smuggler - and really liking it - the Ripmo came out with near identical geo, a bit more travel, tire switch capability and DW link suspension. I previously had a Mach429 and really liked the suspension and wanted the switch ability. In the end, though, I got the carbon Smuggler because Ibis is quite a bit more expensive than Transition and I have no regrets. I agree you have to ride them. The Ripmo, with it's "SBG" numbers will take a bit of time on it to really appreciate it.

    Now 3 months later, I love my Smuggler! It's an amazingly capable bike and makes me both look like a better rider and an actual better rider! I've not had any issues with my Smuggler being too long, either.

    Try them all... get the one that feels the best to you.

  4. #4
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    Hey Svinyard- do you happen to have a link to that rocky forum? I couldn't find the one you were talking about.

  5. #5
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    The big question is what kind of trails do you ride. I was hoping the Ripmo would be more like the Switchblade since Ibis sells frame only as an option. The Switchblade is great on tighter trails but can feel nervous at really high speeds. The rimpmo is a pretty long bike. Better for trails with longer straight downhills.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    The big question is what kind of trails do you ride. I was hoping the Ripmo would be more like the Switchblade since Ibis sells frame only as an option. The Switchblade is great on tighter trails but can feel nervous at really high speeds. The rimpmo is a pretty long bike. Better for trails with longer straight downhills.
    The switchblade guys that I know, that really rip the bike have a full ac3 coil in the fork and moved off the little shock to a full blown X2. It's great but like pushing 32+ lbs.

    Ripmo is so long. I honestly think we've jumped the shark with these longer bikes. We aren't all straight lining rock gardens all day. 29ers are already good at that without the super length.

    Rocky Mountain Instinct Forum :
    2018 Rocky Instinct?

    Fwiw I have a custom 140mm instinct with fox 36 grip2/DPX2. I also have the 160mm airspring, link and x2 shock to make it a BC edition for big trips. Takes a couple of hours to convert to a 155mm/160mm bike. Jesse Maleamede (sp?) is racing it in ews with a 170mm spring in the fork and loves it. My 140mm XL with everything (lots and lots of frameskin) and big 2.5/2.4 dhf and dhr tires is 29lbs.
    Sorry, obligatory pic:
    Ripmo or Switchblade-20180711_091309.jpg

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by svinyard View Post
    not dealing with super boost complexities.

    Um, complexities? It's a hub, that slots into the frame, using a thru-axle. Just like every other modern bike.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by svinyard View Post
    Ripmo is so long. I honestly think we've jumped the shark with these longer bikes. We aren't all straight lining rock gardens all day. 29ers are already good at that without the super length.
    I respectfully disagree. IMO finally an Ibis that is long enough in my books. I'm going with a Fugitive, but the Ripmo sounds perfect for my riding as well.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  9. #9
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    Rode/demoed the Ripmo last month. I own the Ripley. Now Im selling the Ripley as soon as the stock of Ripmo has caught up to the demand. Ripmo is mo better.
    "You can become a very fast donkey, but you'll never be a thoroughbred..."

  10. #10
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    I haven't had "time" on either of these bikes, but did full day demo's on both. I hated the way the switchblade climbed but it was decent on techy descents. I felt like I needed a shorter stem for proper steering inputs at speed. Had too many pedals strikes on technical climbs.

    The Ripmo did everything well, but nothing amazing, in my opinion. I was getting ready to go grab a Yeti 5.5 for the day when my friend who is a shop owner called me to come try out a Carbon Sentinel that his customer backed out on. I had no interest in trying this bike as it is so slack, long, and low. Numbers did not get me excited about trying this bike. It is long as hell and hangs a foot off the side of my truck when mounted in the Kuat. By the numbers, it should suck at climbing and only excel at rock garden straight line bombers.

    I rode it near his shop and went and climbed the steepest road in the area so I could be done with it and say I didn't like it. I felt almost no movement in the suspension and it climbed with ease. Made no sense with 170mm cranks and sled geometry. Then I flew down the road and was shocked at how snappy the steering was. Got back from a road test ride and bought the bike immediately. I am within 2% of all my climbing segments when compared to my 25lb Carbon Les Fat and bombing everything downhill. Riding trails I used to avoid and feeling like a kid again. This bike rips and climbs to get you there. No complaints...

    Hate to be the guy who suggests a different bike, but ride everything before you decide. The SB and Ripmo are both amazing bikes so either choice will be good. Just find the bike that makes you smile like a fool.
    Hunt Hard, Kill Swiftly, Waste Nothing, Offer No Apologies...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shamis View Post
    I haven't had "time" on either of these bikes, but did full day demo's on both. I hated the way the switchblade climbed but it was decent on techy descents. I felt like I needed a shorter stem for proper steering inputs at speed. Had too many pedals strikes on technical climbs.

    The Ripmo did everything well, but nothing amazing, in my opinion. I was getting ready to go grab a Yeti 5.5 for the day when my friend who is a shop owner called me to come try out a Carbon Sentinel that his customer backed out on. I had no interest in trying this bike as it is so slack, long, and low. Numbers did not get me excited about trying this bike. It is long as hell and hangs a foot off the side of my truck when mounted in the Kuat. By the numbers, it should suck at climbing and only excel at rock garden straight line bombers.

    I rode it near his shop and went and climbed the steepest road in the area so I could be done with it and say I didn't like it. I felt almost no movement in the suspension and it climbed with ease. Made no sense with 170mm cranks and sled geometry. Then I flew down the road and was shocked at how snappy the steering was. Got back from a road test ride and bought the bike immediately. I am within 2% of all my climbing segments when compared to my 25lb Carbon Les Fat and bombing everything downhill. Riding trails I used to avoid and feeling like a kid again. This bike rips and climbs to get you there. No complaints...

    Hate to be the guy who suggests a different bike, but ride everything before you decide. The SB and Ripmo are both amazing bikes so either choice will be good. Just find the bike that makes you smile like a fool.
    Most people compare the Sentinel to the Ripmo because of the travel. But a better comparison is Ripmo to Smuggler; they have nearly identical geometry with the only real difference being the travel.

    But I can understand your reaction. SBG is a very real thing! I'm not the greatest climber and was worried about "just" a 4-bar system but whatever Transition has done to get their Giddy Up 2.0, that works, too! Sentinel was just more bike than I needed, so I got the Smuggler. But both are awesome bikes!

  12. #12
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    I own a SB, but have never tried the Ripmo. I think the SB is an awesome bike. The short chainstays make the bike easy to throw around or twitchy, depending on how you like your bike to handle. Also, I wonder if those complaining about the climbing ability of the SB demoed it with 29 wheels and the 17mm cup. That's how my bike came and I eventually had the cup removed, the front wheel wandered too much for my taste on the climbs.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    Um, complexities? It's a hub, that slots into the frame, using a thru-axle. Just like every other modern bike.
    LOL, yup. It's a 157 rear hub; nothing new, other than Pivot doing a number on some people's heads.

    My bold prediction is that 157 will be the norm for AM and even trail bikes in 3 - 5 years.

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    If you thought I was talking about "technical complexities" you weren't part of the Pivot Super Boost rollout with the hub manufacturers or were happy with stock wheels. Lots of history there with the Switchblade and it was not pretty. It's not that much better now tho I'm sure it's improving a bit. Nice that Knolly is using it now but I think it's just those 3 or 4 bikes out of all the bikes.

    I just had a wheelset built and they didn't have a single option for superboost. I got to pick every single detail out of a litany of options thankfully as I was on boost. Was awesome. My options would have been MUCH more limited. I don't doubt that it will be more prevalent in the future but until then it can be a bit complicated.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by svinyard View Post
    If you thought I was talking about "technical complexities" you weren't part of the Pivot Super Boost rollout with the hub manufacturers or were happy with stock wheels. Lots of history there with the Switchblade and it was not pretty. It's not that much better now tho I'm sure it's improving a bit. Nice that Knolly is using it now but I think it's just those 3 or 4 bikes out of all the bikes.

    I just had a wheelset built and they didn't have a single option for superboost. I got to pick every single detail out of a litany of options thankfully as I was on boost. Was awesome. My options would have been MUCH more limited. I don't doubt that it will be more prevalent in the future but until then it can be a bit complicated.


    No, I wasn't part of any of whatever that was, but I'm still confused on how there are 'complexities' involved. It's a hub, with a thru axle piercing it, which is then connected to a frame. Just like almost any/every other bike these days.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by svinyard View Post
    If you thought I was talking about "technical complexities" you weren't part of the Pivot Super Boost rollout with the hub manufacturers or were happy with stock wheels. Lots of history there with the Switchblade and it was not pretty. It's not that much better now tho I'm sure it's improving a bit. Nice that Knolly is using it now but I think it's just those 3 or 4 bikes out of all the bikes.

    I just had a wheelset built and they didn't have a single option for superboost. I got to pick every single detail out of a litany of options thankfully as I was on boost. Was awesome. My options would have been MUCH more limited. I don't doubt that it will be more prevalent in the future but until then it can be a bit complicated.
    I would have used a different term, but I get it now. Some wheel sources don't offer Superboost, or possibly not even 157. I do think any wheelbuilder worthy of the name can build you a wheel with a 157 hub, but I digress...

    Possibly part of the problem is that if you or your wheelbuilder ask for "Superboost", you limit available hubs to those that are marketed as such. I don't know if Pivot has a trademark on that term or if anyone can call their hub Superboost. Per Pivot, the Switchblade is compatible with any 157 hub. For many years, there have been wide-spaced 157 hubs out there - CK, Onyx, Stealth to name a few.

    I've looked high and low, and cannot find actual center-to-flange dimensions on any "Superboost" hub. Curious to see if any of the existing 157 hubs are as wide or wider.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by JACKL View Post
    I would have used a different term, but I get it now. Some wheel sources don't offer Superboost, or possibly not even 157. I do think any wheelbuilder worthy of the name can build you a wheel with a 157 hub, but I digress...

    Possibly part of the problem is that if you or your wheelbuilder ask for "Superboost", you limit available hubs to those that are marketed as such. I don't know if Pivot has a trademark on that term or if anyone can call their hub Superboost. Per Pivot, the Switchblade is compatible with any 157 hub. For many years, there have been wide-spaced 157 hubs out there - CK, Onyx, Stealth to name a few.

    I've looked high and low, and cannot find actual center-to-flange dimensions on any "Superboost" hub. Curious to see if any of the existing 157 hubs are as wide or wider.
    They may have trade marked it. Knolly calls it trail 157. But you are correct may hubs in 157 have wide flanges.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    They may have trade marked it. Knolly calls it trail 157. But you are correct may hubs in 157 have wide flanges.

    They didn't trademark it. Cocalis (when they announced they were using 157) called it SuperBoost as a tongue-in-cheek way of poking fun at all of the new standards that were erupting at that time. 157 hubs have been around and in use for more than a decade. You could get them - then and now - from DT, Hope, King, I9, Onyx, and several other high-end hub makers. I9 took it a step further and pushed the flanges out, so if you're racing DH and a serious contender to win on WC level tracks, then the I9 version will make your rear wheel virtually unfoldable. Not to say that you can't/won't ding, dent, or flat spot it - you will - just that it's really, really hard to taco it.

    For 95% of us, any hub that existed in 157 a decade ago is a measurable and way-more-than-good-enough solution to keeping our wheels stiff, strong, and true.

    Or you can wring your hands and wet the bed over "complexities".

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    They didn't trademark it. Cocalis (when they announced they were using 157) called it SuperBoost as a tongue-in-cheek way of poking fun at all of the new standards that were erupting at that time. 157 hubs have been around and in use for more than a decade. You could get them - then and now - from DT, Hope, King, I9, Onyx, and several other high-end hub makers. I9 took it a step further and pushed the flanges out, so if you're racing DH and a serious contender to win on WC level tracks, then the I9 version will make your rear wheel virtually unfoldable. Not to say that you can't/won't ding, dent, or flat spot it - you will - just that it's really, really hard to taco it.

    For 95% of us, any hub that existed in 157 a decade ago is a measurable and way-more-than-good-enough solution to keeping our wheels stiff, strong, and true.

    Or you can wring your hands and wet the bed over "complexities".
    Make sense, and I've always felt the 157 should have been used at least in 29er instead of boost.

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