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  1. #1
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    Question for you 174lbs folks, what tire pressure are you running for max cornering..

    Just wondering what tire pressure you 170-175 lbs folks are running out there for maximum cornering grip? Looking for an ideal pressure that is a good balance between grip/rolling resistance and won't put my tubeless Maxxis tires at a much greater risk of burping... I've been running them (2.3 Minion DHR in rear, Ardent 2.4 in front) at around 21-24lbs and I feel like they aren't getting the grip they should be getting on loose over hard surfaces (especially in corners.) Any imput would be greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
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    Will depend on a lot of things (trails, style, bike geo, tire casing, speed you carry, list goes on...)

    I weigh approximately same amount and also run Maxxis Tires and often run 21 front 26 rear but recommend if cornering grip is the issue and you have an Ardent 2.4 up front you might be able to loose a little psi if no rim strike issues. Also could be psi is already too low or rim is wide and your feeling sidewall deflection. So many factors just got to keep playing with it.

    One other thing that some don't like to hear, might not be your bike, tire, psi, etc. could just be need to work on form and weighting front tire or braking in a different spot.
    XC, Road, XXC, Endurance, Mtn, All-Mtn, Cross, Gravel, just go have fun on 2 wheels!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by HEMIjer View Post
    Will depend on a lot of things (trails, style, bike geo, tire casing, speed you carry, list goes on...)

    I weigh approximately same amount and also run Maxxis Tires and often run 21 front 26 rear but recommend if cornering grip is the issue and you have an Ardent 2.4 up front you might be able to loose a little psi if no rim strike issues. Also could be psi is already too low or rim is wide and your feeling sidewall deflection. So many factors just got to keep playing with it.

    One other thing that some don't like to hear, might not be your bike, tire, psi, etc. could just be need to work on form and weighting front tire or braking in a different spot.
    Thank you for your input, I really appreciate it! I think you are right about working on form/technique, I'm always trying to get better. I just want to make sure my equipment isn't hindering my performance...

  4. #4
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    Hi there! My geared up weight is ~170 + ~30 for the bike. Here is what I am running:
    Front Ardent 2.4 EXO on 23mm ID rim at 27psi
    Rear Ardent Race 2.2 EXO on 23mm ID rim at 29 psi

    It feels alright. I'll be going to a different front tire the next time around. The Ardent has good braking and cornering grip, but the transition zone is really slippy and scary.

    You may be able to get a bit more traction by adjusting your suspension as well. Try a tad more sag or a bit more rebound damping and see how it feels.

  5. #5
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    I think the problem could be the Ardent up front. It is not renowned for its cornering prowess! You could go more aggressive on the front tire and not lose much in the way of increased rolling resistance. That may be more important than pressure.

    Also, improvements in cornering technique (and I'm not saying that's YOUR problem, but it has been mine) can dramatically improve the cornering characteristics of whatever tire you are using. Oops, I see that's been mentioned.

    If the problem is associated with cornering in bumpy conditions, I would not increase rebound damping as that will tend to cause the fork to "pack up" from consecutive hits.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff29 View Post
    Hi there! My geared up weight is ~170 + ~30 for the bike. Here is what I am running:
    Front Ardent 2.4 EXO on 23mm ID rim at 27psi
    Rear Ardent Race 2.2 EXO on 23mm ID rim at 29 psi

    It feels alright. I'll be going to a different front tire the next time around. The Ardent has good braking and cornering grip, but the transition zone is really slippy and scary.

    You may be able to get a bit more traction by adjusting your suspension as well. Try a tad more sag or a bit more rebound damping and see how it feels.
    I totally agree with you about the Ardent having a sketchy transition area, I am definitely going to be going with a different front tire next spring (any suggestions on a super grippy front tire?) ... I have been playing with suspension settings lately and that is a lot of tinkering and trial and error... Does anyone have any direct experience with the Quark ShockWiz? I'm thinking about slapping down some cold hard ones on it if it really is a help in dialing in my suspension. Thanks for the replies, they're greatly appreciated!

  7. #7
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    I'm around this weight range (I think a few pounds more) and use 17.5-18psi in the front and about 21 in the rear according to my pump. I typically use 2.3 maxxis dhf, dhr2, aggressor, hr2 etc front and rear, only the exo models. I use an old industry nine trail wheelset, 23.5mm internal width, I've never had any issues with tubeless burping or anything, but many people seem to have issues running at such low pressures. Maybe this wheelset is just extra good at avoiding these issues. Using smaller tires like 2.25 ardents, I have to run another psi or two higher. You just have to play around with pressures, I get tires as low as possible before they get squirrely and the casing gets too marshmellowed. Running at such low pressures though I think drastically increases the wear of the sidewalls, I recently got rid of a dhf that had good tread still but the sidewalls were leaking sealant and quite weak, but the cornering was no longer as good and it seemed to be because the casing was no longer as strong and starting to slightly fold/ no longer support the side knobs as well when cornering. I mostly do trail riding too with some light dh stuff if that helps.

    I thought my pump might be broken, but the + bike I demoed (hd3 with 2.8 nobby nics) was set up with only a few psi lower, so maybe not, although I felt the tires did have too much air and weren't really providing the squish they should be, so maybe my pump is off. Either way, go as low as you can before the casing rolls over when cornering or before burping the tire and use that pressure. I never have read anybody else using as low pressures as I do but i've ridden 100s, if not 1,000s of miles on these low pressures and have never burped a tire, dented my rim, etc. In fact, I got a slight wobble in my wheel after about 1.5 years riding on the wheelset, I took it in to get trued and the local bike shop said it was off less than most wheels ridden in shorter amounts of time and not worth truing yet, so I have not damaged my wheelsetusing the pressures either.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    I think the problem could be the Ardent up front. It is not renowned for its cornering prowess! You could go more aggressive on the front tire and not lose much in the way of increased rolling resistance. That may be more important than pressure.

    Also, improvements in cornering technique (and I'm not saying that's YOUR problem, but it has been mine) can dramatically improve the cornering characteristics of whatever tire you are using. Oops, I see that's been mentioned.

    If the problem is associated with cornering in bumpy conditions, I would not increase rebound damping as that will tend to cause the fork to "pack up" from consecutive hits.
    This, your better off switching your rear tier to the front put the ardent to the rear if money is tight. My dry trial set up is DHR2 front and Fork aster rear. I just put another DHR2 on the rear since we're in the wet season now.

  9. #9
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    I too just moved my Ardent 2.4 to the rear and put a DHF up front. WAY better cornering on loose-over-hard stuff, which is almost 90% of what I ride.

    I'd try what Cerberus suggested and switch them around to see if it improves. then buy a new front tire if needed.

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  10. #10
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    Seems high. I'm 169 and run conti mtn king cross king 2.2 and I'm 17.5 front 21 rear. Let some air out.


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  11. #11
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    It also depends on what inner width rim you're running. Wider lets you go with lower pressure for a bigger footprint. You can pick a high volume tire with a more rounded profile to work better on wider rims without squaring off. Inner widths can go from 19mm to 35mm or more. 120tpi sidewalls help at lower pressures. The sidewall is more flexible and can crinkle down on wide rims for good grip with the resulting footprint.

  12. #12
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    I run DHF/DHR 2.3's, ~25psi front and ~28psi rear. I also ride New England trails where you're more concerned about rim strikes on continuous rock. A hard core trail ride averages ~7mph. That's not to say there aren't any high speed corners, but they're obviously a small percentage of ride time.

  13. #13
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    I used an Ardent Exo TR 2.4" on a 26mm ID rim up front, I kept washing out in places I never washed out with other tires.
    As others already told, the Ardent is not a good front tire. Get a new tire, or swap your current tires.

  14. #14
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    Not lower than 30psi, and I never knew what the hype was with the Ardent, tried it back in the day and found it to be poor for cornering traction.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tunesoul View Post
    I totally agree with you about the Ardent having a sketchy transition area, I am definitely going to be going with a different front tire next spring (any suggestions on a super grippy front tire?) ... I have been playing with suspension settings lately and that is a lot of tinkering and trial and error... Does anyone have any direct experience with the Quark ShockWiz? I'm thinking about slapping down some cold hard ones on it if it really is a help in dialing in my suspension. Thanks for the replies, they're greatly appreciated!
    Im 175 and ride about 20 psi. I ride a nobby nic in front and maxxis ikon 2.3 in back. The ardent in front is a bad choice I found them incredible sketchy. Never washed out more than when I had an ardent in front. I would switch the ardent and the dhr to get more traction in front. If the back slides it is no big deal.

  16. #16
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    You have to find the secret pressure out for yourself. On my xc bike with light tubeless tires I run 30 front and rear. If I don't I'll rip a sidewall. On my enduro I run less but if I get close to 20 I end up smashing a rim.
    It depends on how light or heavy a rider you are and what terrain you ride.

  17. #17
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    I am a little over that weight.
    I am 195 kitted up.

    Ardent 2.4" front on 26mm ID rims I run at 15-16 PSI.
    Ikon 2.35 rear on 26mm ID rims. I run 22-23PSI


    I feel the Ardent corners just fine. I need to work on my cornering mainly.
    I have gone under 15 PSI and started to get some rock hits.
    I have ran the Ardent race 2.35 in the front. rolls faster, is 4oz lighter but I did feel a lot less traction in the corners

    My 3" tire bike I ran a Maxxis DHF front at 10psi and had a crap load of traction but it was a pita to get it going and keep going on flat trails.
    Too Many .

  18. #18
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    185 ready to ride. 23-25psi front, 25-27psi rear. Maxxis minion dhf 2.3" front on i30 wheels, maxxis dhr 2.3" rear on i30 wheels.

    On my XC hardtail I run 21-23psi front, 23-26 psi rear. Maxxis forecaster 2.3" front, Maxxis Ikon 2.35 rear. 23iw wheels.

    I had the ardent. It has a un-communicative transition period while being leaned over. Works decently well as a rear tire as it allows you to kick the bike into a drift but I can't run it as a front due to washouts. I do really love the extra volume of the 2.4 ardant but i just can't love it. Bontrager and specialized have some great tires with similar tread then the ardent if your looking for that gnarly xc/light trail type of tire. Maxxis sorta has a dead spot in their lineup which will get filled if hte Recon starts getting made in 2.3" sizes.

  19. #19
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    Thank you for all of your insight, I'll definitely take ALL of this into consideration. I am definitely going to swap out the front Ardent to Maxxis Minion DHF or a Maxxis Tomahawk. Does anyone have experience running either one of these as a front tire? BTW, I'm running a 25mm rim. Thanks for the help!

  20. #20
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    I was told that for my ibis 941 rims (35mm internal width) to run bodyweight in lbs as psi ni the front and for the rear as for the front but add 2-3 psi. If riding downhill or rocky terrain then add 2-3 psi on each of those numbers. Worked for me so far in two years. I have had a hole put in my rear rim, but it wasn't anything due to low tyre pressure as the rock strike was a good way up the rim and due to a bad line/random strike rather than at the tyre/rim interface and due to low tyre pressures.

  21. #21
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    put a Minion DHF on the front

  22. #22
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    You got a ton of great advices, it is up to you to do the fine tuning. I just had my suspension on my 29 hardtail tuned stiffer and my bike is going much better, maybe a different front tire will be good/great for you. I use a grippier tire in front than the rear. All the best !

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tunesoul View Post
    Thank you for all of your insight, I'll definitely take ALL of this into consideration. I am definitely going to swap out the front Ardent to Maxxis Minion DHF or a Maxxis Tomahawk. Does anyone have experience running either one of these as a front tire? BTW, I'm running a 25mm rim. Thanks for the help!
    The dhf comes equipped as a front tire on so many bikes, is called the DownHillFront (DHF), and is widely copied all for a reason, it rocks in general, especially upfront! I got the 2.3 on 23.4mm internal width rims and its great, will be even better on your 25mm internal width rims for sure. I already posted about it in this thread but I got a new dhf recently as my old one wore out and cornering is amazing again. The DHF is good from bone dry to fairly wet it seems, corners amazingly, rolls decent, brakes good, lasts quite a long time and is durable. I think I already mentioned it in this thread or possibly others but the highroller 2 for example felt a bit more stuck to the ground but also rolled a lot slower and the side knobs are not supported as well as the dhf so they tend to rip from the base of the casing, not all the way off but they definitely rip. So, the dhf is a pretty good balance of everything, still wish I could try a 2.5 up front but honestly a fresh new 2.3 dhf is pretty much good enough!

    Quote Originally Posted by dreednya View Post
    I was told that for my ibis 941 rims (35mm internal width) to run bodyweight in lbs as psi ni the front and for the rear as for the front but add 2-3 psi.
    I must be missing something because adding the same psi as body weight for the op would mean you are riding with 174psi! The tire will blow up before then, a dhf and most tires have a max psi of 60psi.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by agreenbike View Post
    The dhf comes equipped as a front tire on so many bikes, is called the DownHillFront (DHF), and is widely copied all for a reason, it rocks in general, especially upfront! I got the 2.3 on 23.4mm internal width rims and its great, will be even better on your 25mm internal width rims for sure. I already posted about it in this thread but I got a new dhf recently as my old one wore out and cornering is amazing again. The DHF is good from bone dry to fairly wet it seems, corners amazingly, rolls decent, brakes good, lasts quite a long time and is durable. I think I already mentioned it in this thread or possibly others but the highroller 2 for example felt a bit more stuck to the ground but also rolled a lot slower and the side knobs are not supported as well as the dhf so they tend to rip from the base of the casing, not all the way off but they definitely rip. So, the dhf is a pretty good balance of everything, still wish I could try a 2.5 up front but honestly a fresh new 2.3 dhf is pretty much good enough!

    I must be missing something because adding the same psi as body weight for the op would mean you are riding with 174psi! The tire will blow up before then, a dhf and most tires have a max psi of 60psi.
    Thanks for all the great info! I've been leaning towards the DHF. At this point I'm pretty sure I'm going with that tire. Thanks again for taking time to provide me with all the great info!

    I was thinking the same thing... Not sure what he was trying to say about PSI, but I'm pretty sure that wasn't what he meant to say...

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tunesoul View Post
    Thanks for all the great info! I've been leaning towards the DHF. At this point I'm pretty sure I'm going with that tire. Thanks again for taking time to provide me with all the great info!

    I was thinking the same thing... Not sure what he was trying to say about PSI, but I'm pretty sure that wasn't what he meant to say...
    I am not sure but from memory it was divided by 7 so me 154 = 22PSI and 24PSI rear and also from memory it was for 29in tires, but to be used as a start than small adjusment either way after personal testing.

  26. #26
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    Depends greatly on rim inner width, past your weight but on my old 21mm IW rims had to run high 20s low 30s no matter what tire or I'd get fold over occurring. On 29mm inner width rims I can run low 20s without issue
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  27. #27
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    I'll be looking to get better tires next season but I ride mostly loose over hard. 29mm innners, Schwalbe Hans Dampf 2.35f at 20psi and Schwalbe Nobby Nic 2.35r at 22psi. A big difference in more front grip I recently noticed is when I moved to a slightly longer stem.

  28. #28
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    Combined with using a Minion as a front tire as mentioned, watch these videos and learn how to do cutties (if you don't already), it makes a dramatic difference when trying to unlock the max cornering traction:
    Four Insanely Awesome Cutties with Bryn Atkinson - Mountain Bikes Feature Stories - Vital MTB

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