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  1. #1
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    Opinions please...Soukri vs. El Mariachi

    Anyone riding either one of these that can give some insight to their performance characteristics would be appreciated.

    I've pretty much narrowed my search to these two bikes...my criteria are 29 (of course), steel, mid-range gruppo, $1500-$1700 complete. Rigid or suspension fork, doesn't matter.

    From what I've read, the Voodoo Soukri is built around 100mm-125mm fork geometry, and the Salsa is built around an 80-100mm geo. My personal riding tendencies sway towards the latter...Iess travel the better. However, I usally ride full rigid...just wondering if I do go with the Voodoo if I will be unhappy with the slightly slacker handling.

    lemmeknowwhatyagot.

  2. #2
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    Interesting. I'd never seen the Soukri before just checking it out, but I can tell you that I always lusted after the mid-90's, Joe Murray era, blazing orange Bizango. That said, I've been really happy with my original, 2007 El Mar. I've run it as a 1x9 and as a SS -- always rigid with the stock, matching cromoto fork. Rides great, and I can always keep up with my buddies on their front/dual suspension rigs. Only issues I've had with my El Mar are BB related: 1) the eccentric is a bit of a pain, and 2) the low BB height contributes to pedal strikes on my rocky trails. Nothing major, but I'd much prefer the swinger dropouts they're currently using (suspiciously similar to the bad-ass Black Cat drops).

    The upside of the Voodoo being built around a 100mm suspension fork is that you can always experiment with shorter/longer rigid forks to find a length/rake that works for you. Additionally, the longer fork will probably flex a tiny bit more to give a *slightly* more plush ride.

    Enjoy your decision.

  3. #3
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    I had a Dambala (actually, two of them), and while I love the Voodoo brand (I keep looking at the Soukri), I was constantly frustrated by the sliding dropouts. I found them a pain to get set up right, and then they would slip. Again. Repeat... I've read some others had issues with the dropout plate stripping out as well.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by sommerfliesby View Post
    From what I've read, the Voodoo Soukri is built around 100mm-125mm fork geometry, and the Salsa is built around an 80-100mm geo. My personal riding tendencies sway towards the latter...Iess travel the better. However, I usally ride full rigid...just wondering if I do go with the Voodoo if I will be unhappy with the slightly slacker handling.
    The Soukri isn't really slacker at all. In fact it's pretty much the reverse.

    They are both designed to have about the same 72deg HA when using the forks they were designed for: Soukri with a 500mm rigid, El Mar with a more common 468mm rigid. And if you put a common 470mm rigid fork on the Soukri it would actually be a good bit quicker handling than the El Mariachi's stock config

    Also, note that the numbers for the Soukri are designed around an unsagged 100mm fork. This means that with an 100mm fork installed, as soon as you sit on the bike it will be closer to 73deg HA. In contrast the Salsa's number show what the geo would be with an 80mm fork after you are sitting on the bike. The only way to get the Soukri as slack as the Salsa with the susp fork under 20% sag is to put a 120mm fork on it.
    Last edited by boomn; 05-31-2011 at 07:47 PM.

  5. #5
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    Don't know about the Voodoo, but I'm enjoying the crap out of my El Mariachi (2010). I will guarantee that you will love yours as well, AND reward you with a + rep upon purchase and posting of pics.

  6. #6
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    I'm loving my Dambala, and I don't have any issues with my sliding dropouts. It's certainly not slack, it's every bit as aggressive as my last bike (a 26er rocket.)

  7. #7
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    I wish this was making my decision easier! lol. I've got sliding dropouts on my Milwaukee 29er ss...had them loosen up on me only once so far, and that was really the result of it being a singlespeed in some very steep terrain...LOTS of cranking tension. I'd think there would be less tendency to loosen when you are running geared as there wouldn't be as much strain in the drivetrain.

    LBS sells Salsa...so I think I'll drop in to see how their numbers work out vs. buying online and building myself...

  8. #8
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    plus there are adjustable headset these days to change your headset angles. so pick the bike you want.
    get to know me thru my blog
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    spend $$ at my sponsors shop http://www.revolutionutah.com/

  9. #9
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    They may actually be more likely to slip with a geared setup, since you can put more torque down with a low climbing gear. Then again, you can run the dropout all the forward, so it shouldn't be able to slip (assuming the brake doesn't cause it slip on the other side)

    Quote Originally Posted by sommerfliesby View Post
    I wish this was making my decision easier! lol. I've got sliding dropouts on my Milwaukee 29er ss...had them loosen up on me only once so far, and that was really the result of it being a singlespeed in some very steep terrain...LOTS of cranking tension. I'd think there would be less tendency to loosen when you are running geared as there wouldn't be as much strain in the drivetrain.

    LBS sells Salsa...so I think I'll drop in to see how their numbers work out vs. buying online and building myself...

  10. #10
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    There are plenty of sliding dropout frames that work well, but the voodoo sliders have a reputation for being problematic. I imagine a search would bring up some relevant threads.
    Originally posted by bucksaw87
    I still fail to see how mustaches, fixies, and PBR are ironic.

  11. #11
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    Had a Dambala, was happy for the longest time until I realized my early geometry frame had toe overlap issues and fork crown/downtube clearance issues. The sliding dropouts wanted to slip but it was remedied with the addition of threadlock and crush washers. I recently sold that frame and picked up a new El Mariachi frame that is 80% built in the garage. I can't wait to get out and ride it. I already see the advantages of the new dropout system.

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