Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    26

    New wheel or wheels?

    I've stuffed my rear rim and a couple of spokes. The wheels is the stock set that came with the bike. My options are to get a newer, stronger rear wheel, different width to my front for $400. The other is a well reviewed, carbon wheeler for $1300. The question is where my money should go. I can stretch to the carbon set but wonder if the alloy rear wheel would be the smarter way to go.
    I ride an aggressive hardtail and I'm a biggish rider. 6'3, 97kg.
    I welcome your feedback.

    Sent from my HTC_0PJA10 using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    39
    My dimensions are pretty much spot on with you. Blokes our size aren't going to win any speed contests, and at our weight and riding aggressively I view any rear wheel as having a limited lifespan. Personally I'd stick with alloy and spend the savings elsewhere.

  3. #3
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    27,334
    Quote Originally Posted by McNazgul View Post
    I've stuffed my rear rim and a couple of spokes. The wheels is the stock set that came with the bike. My options are to get a newer, stronger rear wheel, different width to my front for $400. The other is a well reviewed, carbon wheeler for $1300. The question is where my money should go. I can stretch to the carbon set but wonder if the alloy rear wheel would be the smarter way to go.
    I ride an aggressive hardtail and I'm a biggish rider. 6'3, 97kg.
    I welcome your feedback.

    Sent from my HTC_0PJA10 using Tapatalk
    It depends on a lot. What size wheels does your bike use? How likely are you to stay with this style of bike (rim and tire width) in the next few years? Are you doing competitive XC racing? The carbon wheelsets are nice, allow for wider rims at the same or less weight with far greater stiffness (or lighter rims at the same width). Wheels are the most significant place where you can lose weight on the bike. But as much as I love how these handle and accelerate, good hubs are more important. At $1300, you can definitely get some good carbon rim wheelsets from Light Bicycles or Nextie with good hubs, there is no doubt there. There might, however, be some proprietary-hub or low-end-hub carbon wheelsets for sale at some retailer, like Roval or something with no-name hubs. I'd stay far away from something like that, some good hubs like DT350, Hope Pro4, XTR, I9, Hadley, etc., are far more important than the rim material IME. A good wheel starts with a good hub.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    26
    I ride a 29er hardtail trail bike. No racing at all. Definitely staying with this bike for a few years. If I change bike it'll remain on same wheel size. Love the 29er. Not too interested in weight saving, though nice, I'm looking for a more durable rim. Something that won't bend. The carbon wheelset I'm looking at is Nextie rims on hope pro 4 hubs.

    Sent from my HTC_0PJA10 using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    It depends on a lot. What size wheels does your bike use? How likely are you to stay with this style of bike (rim and tire width) in the next few years? Are you doing competitive XC racing? The carbon wheelsets are nice, allow for wider rims at the same or less weight with far greater stiffness (or lighter rims at the same width). Wheels are the most significant place where you can lose weight on the bike. But as much as I love how these handle and accelerate, good hubs are more important. At $1300, you can definitely get some good carbon rim wheelsets from Light Bicycles or Nextie with good hubs, there is no doubt there. There might, however, be some proprietary-hub or low-end-hub carbon wheelsets for sale at some retailer, like Roval or something with no-name hubs. I'd stay far away from something like that, some good hubs like DT350, Hope Pro4, XTR, I9, Hadley, etc., are far more important than the rim material IME. A good wheel starts with a good hub.
    I ride a 29er hardtail trail bike. No racing at all. Definitely staying with this bike for a few years. If I change bike it'll remain on same wheel size. Love the 29er. Not too interested in weight saving, though nice, I'm looking for a more durable rim. Something that won't bend. The carbon wheelset I'm looking at is Nextie rims on hope pro 4 hubs.

    Sent from my HTC_0PJA10 using Tapatalk

    Sent from my HTC_0PJA10 using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    60
    Just go with DT350 laced to EX471, bombproof.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    11,110
    This gives you the chance to go with a wider rim. Like a WTB asym i35. Lace it with Sapim Race spokes and Polyax nipples. 150.
    This will let you tune with wider tires or tires with more rounded profiles. You can run less pressure as long as you don't go low enough to start getting rim hits. More traction and compliance. Carbon Fan will ship you a DT350 asym carbon rim wheelset for 775.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    154
    Based on what you have written here, I don't know why you want to spend so much money. If you are willing to spend $1300 on new wheels, your bike is a pretty nice bike, and the existing wheels/hub probably don't suck. What's wrong with just getting another rim and just swapping that out? You could even use the same spokes if the new rim has the same effective rim diameter (ERD). The technique would be to place the new rim side by side with the old and swap spokes over one at a time. That's what everyone did when a new rim was needed back when I started riding in the '80s. You could be back up running for $50 or whatever rims cost these days and an hour's work if you know what you are doing. Or pay someone/a shop about $50 to do the rim swap for you.

    People shouldn't think they need to spend $400 and a whole new wheel when all you need is a rim replacement. And $1300? I got my entire hardtail 29er bike that included a like-new nice set of carbon wheels ($1200 new for the wheelset) for $1100. On the other hand, if you have the money to burn and want to spend it, go for it.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by xcandrew View Post
    Based on what you have written here, I don't know why you want to spend so much money. If you are willing to spend $1300 on new wheels, your bike is a pretty nice bike, and the existing wheels/hub probably don't suck. What's wrong with just getting another rim and just swapping that out? You could even use the same spokes if the new rim has the same effective rim diameter (ERD). The technique would be to place the new rim side by side with the old and swap spokes over one at a time. That's what everyone did when a new rim was needed back when I started riding in the '80s. You could be back up running for $50 or whatever rims cost these days and an hour's work if you know what you are doing. Or pay someone/a shop about $50 to do the rim swap for you.

    People shouldn't think they need to spend $400 and a whole new wheel when all you need is a rim replacement. And $1300? I got my entire hardtail 29er bike that included a like-new nice set of carbon wheels ($1200 new for the wheelset) for $1100. On the other hand, if you have the money to burn and want to spend it, go for it.
    I see your point. I don't know how to build wheels. So I'd be looking at new tools to build a set increasing the cost. The current wheels are adequate. They are WTB I23 with novatec hubs. The 23 is just a bit narrow/weak. I would likely use these as practice wheels to learn wheel building.
    Also, I live in Australia. The down under tax is painful. LBS, who quoted 400 foe the wheel says that to lace up a rim they charge $90-100. Add in the cost of new spokes $100, rim $100. See where I'm coming from?
    Then I have a mismatched rim. Burly and wide in the back same old rim up front.

    Sent from my HTC_0PJA10 using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    11,110
    What about tax on a wheelset from China? Carbon Fan will build you one with asymmetrical carbon rims and DT350 hubs for $775US. Shipped. I recommend their rims from personal use.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    893
    Quote Originally Posted by McNazgul View Post
    I've stuffed my rear rim and a couple of spokes. The wheels is the stock set that came with the bike. My options are to get a newer, stronger rear wheel, different width to my front for $400. The other is a well reviewed, carbon wheeler for $1300. The question is where my money should go. I can stretch to the carbon set but wonder if the alloy rear wheel would be the smarter way to go.
    I ride an aggressive hardtail and I'm a biggish rider. 6'3, 97kg.
    I welcome your feedback.

    Sent from my HTC_0PJA10 using Tapatalk
    I'm heavy and can tear up a cheap hub quick. There isn't anything wrong with carbon. Make sure you have a decent size tire for the rim width and don't go to low on the pressure.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    26
    Thanks for all of the input guys. I've ordered a set of Nextie 29er AM/Enduro rims with hope pro 4 hubs.
    I went with these over other brands due to there being an Australian distributor. This will make any warranty issues etc. a lot easier. They get good reviews also and their service so far has been great.
    I'll post up once they arrive and let you know how they go.

    They're coming tubeless ready so deciding on tires now.
    Thinking maxxis DHF 2.5 on front and DHR/High Roller 2.3 rear. Any recommendations?

    Sent from my HTC_0PJA10 using Tapatalk

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-20-2015, 06:26 PM
  2. New wheels/SLRPE Wheel Works
    By frank daleview in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 01-07-2014, 12:54 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-20-2013, 11:03 AM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-07-2012, 11:03 AM
  5. New Mavic EX 823/Hope Wheels from SRLPE Wheel Works
    By eugenemtbing in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-19-2011, 11:46 AM

Members who have read this thread: 89

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •