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  1. #1
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    New suspension platform to rival the Brain?

    Lapierre + RockShox Launch Auto-adjust E.I. Shock Suspension - BikeRadar

    Soon to be available on the Lapierre XR29 models. I can see this breaking the Specialized strangle hold on the XC full sus race bike market. (So long as its reliable!)
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  2. #2
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    Looks interesting. I can see the point of this for racing if you've got lots of money to spend, but even though the article says it's been tested for durability, I am naturally cynical and I'll be very interested to see how reliable this really is.

  3. #3
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    Sounds way too complicated and fail potential...
    Brain is cool, but honestly I think it's stupid.

    Propedal on or propedal off, none of this unpredictable in-between stuff. Brain = unnecessary weight IMO.
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  4. #4
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    it's some kind of Fox Terralogic in rear suspension, which is i think not good.

  5. #5
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    Looks like a lot of wires that will snag on a rock or a tree or or, KISS=Keep It Simple Stupid.
    This does not look ready for prime time IMO.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perfect Gentleman View Post
    it's some kind of Fox Terralogic in rear suspension, which is i think not good.
    That's exactly what the Brain is, which has been highly successful for Specialized over the last 10 years or so.

    The Brain (or Terralogic) which has an inertia valve, needs the wheel to hit a bump before it can activate, so its always a delayed response (or at least this is how it was on my 2007 Epic)

    This system uses a bump felt at the front wheel to tune the rear suspension, so in theory there won't be any lag.
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  7. #7
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    is the Brain suspension worth the extra money?

  8. #8
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    xcbarny, truly saying, i don't like Terralogic. i was longing for it for some time in the past when i had HT. but lately i realized that "smart" suspension which decides when to work or not to work is no good. RLC is much more reliable and safer for rider who prefers aggressive riding.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowseruni View Post
    is the Brain suspension worth the extra money?
    as for me, certainly not

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perfect Gentleman View Post
    xcbarny, truly saying, i don't like Terralogic. i was longing for it for some time in the past when i had HT. but lately i realized that "smart" suspension which decides when to work or not to work is no good. RLC is much more reliable and safer for rider who prefers aggressive riding.
    I've never tried a Terralogic fork, fork bob doesn't really bother me, and if I want it locked out, then I'll flip the lock out lever. But not knowing if the fork is going to react to a bump is an issue for me (but maybe not if I actually tried one - obviously some people like it)

    However, with the Brain, it doesn't matter so much if the rear suspension doesn't react to the first bump - its not going to send you over the bars.

    A nice feature of the Brain is that you can atack a climb, out of the saddle, and have all (nearly) your power going into the rear wheel, rather than some onto the wheel, and some into the rears shock, and without having to remember to flip the lockout lever.

    I sold my Epic though (26er) , once I got a hard tail 29er, and again got used to riding a hardtail. The Brain does do what it's designed to do well, and the fact that the Epic is the only full suspension bike ridden (and won) in the world cup speaks volumes. However, for me It was let down when riding smoothish trails, with the odd rock or root here and there. The suspension would stay locked out in these situations. I actually wished that my epic and a handlebar mounted 'Brain off' switch, so that I could easily deactivate it for a downhill.

    If this electronic system works well, then this shouldn't be an issue, it'll just work, everytime the front wheel hits a bump. Obviously its not for everybody, but I can also see alot of people liking it - probably the same sort of people that have owned an Epic.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowseruni View Post
    is the Brain suspension worth the extra money?
    If you race XC and want to ride a full suspension bike, then it is one of the few options.

    The big plus is that it will lock out the suspension on flat sections, without you having to remember to flip the lockout lever on (or flip it off when you hit a rocky section).

    To my knowledge its the only full suspension system to have ben ridden to 1st place in a World cup race.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowseruni View Post
    is the Brain suspension worth the extra money?
    That depends on what sort of suspension action you like and what sort of riding you do. I've never really liked the suspension characteristics of the bikes with brain that I've tried (07 SJ, 12 Epic), even with the bump threshold (brain fade or whatever it's called) turned down.

    But judging from the numbers of Epics I see on the trails a lot of people must think it is worth it. To be fair if I wanted a race bike I'd seriously consider one, but there are a lot of other good choices too...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcbarny View Post
    I've never tried a Terralogic fork, fork bob doesn't really bother me, and if I want it locked out, then I'll flip the lock out lever. But not knowing if the fork is going to react to a bump is an issue for me (but maybe not if I actually tried one - obviously some people like it)

    However, with the Brain, it doesn't matter so much if the rear suspension doesn't react to the first bump - its not going to send you over the bars.

    A nice feature of the Brain is that you can atack a climb, out of the saddle, and have all (nearly) your power going into the rear wheel, rather than some onto the wheel, and some into the rears shock, and without having to remember to flip the lockout lever.

    I sold my Epic though (26er) , once I got a hard tail 29er, and again got used to riding a hardtail. The Brain does do what it's designed to do well, and the fact that the Epic is the only full suspension bike ridden (and won) in the world cup speaks volumes. However, for me It was let down when riding smoothish trails, with the odd rock or root here and there. The suspension would stay locked out in these situations. I actually wished that my epic and a handlebar mounted 'Brain off' switch, so that I could easily deactivate it for a downhill.

    If this electronic system works well, then this shouldn't be an issue, it'll just work, everytime the front wheel hits a bump. Obviously its not for everybody, but I can also see alot of people liking it - probably the same sort of people that have owned an Epic.
    I don't think this system affects the damping system of the fork at all, it just uses sensors that are mounted on the fork to gather data to adjust the rear shock.

    This looks like a really interesting technology, and I honestly think it can work. Look at Di2. Sure, it's used on the road but its reliability is very high. This seems like a very similar system, it's just sensors, a controller, and a small electric motor.

    The critical thing is how well tuned the system is, and build quality. But since they're likely going to price it on the highest end of suspension systems, I think there will be sufficient build quality to make it reliable.

    I would certainly be interested in this kind of thing, because my FS doesn't have any sort of pedal platform. This kind of thing seems like the only way to make that kind of bike have a pedal platform.

  14. #14
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    one unlucky fall and you have no suspension

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perfect Gentleman View Post
    one unlucky fall and you have no suspension
    Did you read the article?

    "Should the battery fail, run out or a cable get snagged in use, the shock will remain on the last used setting, but it also has a manual adjuster, via an Allen key. This has no indents but allows the user to run from fully open to fully closed."
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  16. #16
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    xcbarny, i meant that electronic device might broken

  17. #17
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    More things to piss me off because they aren't working right... just what I want.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perfect Gentleman View Post
    xcbarny, i meant that electronic device might broken
    Yeh ok, fair enough. I misinterpreted what you said, thinking that you though the suspension would no longer work, should a cable get damaged for example.

    Obviously theres a chance that you could have a crash and break something on the system. However, I'd think the chances of breaking a rear mech, or a brake lever would be similar.

    Clearly not many people here like the idea of electronically controled suspension.
    I welcome bike companies and engineers that try to come up with new ways of making bikes more efficient.

    Will this system acheive that? We'll have to wait and see.
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  19. #19
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    xcbarny, when you brake lever or rear mech, you can get home and buy new one or ones. as i understood this susp will be specific design for Lapierre bikes only. so if it got broken, it would very difficult to get new one or fix it. in any case, it would take long time.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcbarny View Post
    I've never tried a Terralogic fork, fork bob doesn't really bother me, and if I want it locked out, then I'll flip the lock out lever. But not knowing if the fork is going to react to a bump is an issue for me (but maybe not if I actually tried one - obviously some people like it)

    However, with the Brain, it doesn't matter so much if the rear suspension doesn't react to the first bump - its not going to send you over the bars.

    A nice feature of the Brain is that you can atack a climb, out of the saddle, and have all (nearly) your power going into the rear wheel, rather than some onto the wheel, and some into the rears shock, and without having to remember to flip the lockout lever.

    I sold my Epic though (26er) , once I got a hard tail 29er, and again got used to riding a hardtail. The Brain does do what it's designed to do well, and the fact that the Epic is the only full suspension bike ridden (and won) in the world cup speaks volumes. However, for me It was let down when riding smoothish trails, with the odd rock or root here and there. The suspension would stay locked out in these situations. I actually wished that my epic and a handlebar mounted 'Brain off' switch, so that I could easily deactivate it for a downhill.

    If this electronic system works well, then this shouldn't be an issue, it'll just work, everytime the front wheel hits a bump. Obviously its not for everybody, but I can also see alot of people liking it - probably the same sort of people that have owned an Epic.
    Isn't the Giant Anthem X 29er raced in the World Cup as well?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by uclamatt2007 View Post
    Isn't the Giant Anthem X 29er raced in the World Cup as well?
    And won?
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  22. #22
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    I dont want to have to remember to change my bikes batteries or plug it in at night. It seems kinda weird to do so. But I do love the innovation.
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  23. #23
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    Sounds like the same concerns that people use for not going to di2 on road bikes.

  24. #24
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    Looks like it has a lot of components, electrical connections and wiring. I don't think it can really compete with the relative simplicity of the "Brain", which is a simple, purely mechanical inertia valve (technology from the early 1900's). It's good to see people working towards alternatives but I would say it is better suited for outer space travel! As John Parker, the founder of Yeti cycles told me "if you can't fix it with a rock, it doesn't belong on a clunker!". He told me this from his trade show booth during Interbike 1985, while I was frantically trying to keep electric shifters operating in the booth next to his.
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