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  1. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soupboy
    Downsize your front rings a couple teef each and this whole thread is moot.
    I'm running 36-28-19 teef in the front. Still like the 12-36 cassette. Most of my steep climbing these days happens in the 19t front and 28t rear cogs. Much less cross chain effect, than being on the biggest rear cog, for less chain wear. The 32 & 36 teef rear cogs are used somewhat sparingly and most often on the shallower sections for recovery before the next steep pitch.
    Abandoned the 26" wheel in May '03

  2. #202
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    what concerns me it that the new Shimano 10sp geat has a inner chainring size of 24 teef

    Quote Originally Posted by Soupboy
    Downsize your front rings a couple teef each and this whole thread is moot.

  3. #203
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    [QUOTE=BruceBrown]Bingo!

    Not only the Alps, but Briones in the East Bay area in California. Tough, tough, tough climbs that do not let up until one gets to the top of the ridge. So tough, it's barf city about 1/2 way up the climb. Or about 1/4 way up on a hot California day. The 36T will be perfect for that type of stuff to stay out of the red zone/no turning back/call the medic heart rate range. And the 36T cassette would be ideal for loaded touring off road.

    Represent! Briones is solid and really just a warm up for Mt. Diablo. And lets not forget about Rock Springs (north side of Mt Tam on a July afternoon) Oh, but the pay off...
    I live in a city of Hills and fixie riders, don't try to understand just accept it, they always get passed on the downhill, sorry that's just the way it is.
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash.

  4. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRUZED
    a good Idea if you wanted to run a 1X9. You loose some of the weight removing a shifter, cable and small ring.
    I'm with you... I think this (12-36T) is perfect for runnning 1X9 with a 32T chainring on a 29er... I can't imagine the need for a 36T cog with a 22T chainring... on any size wheel... if you need a gear that easy, you're either too out of shape, or the "cliff" you're riding up is so steep, you wouldn't be able to keep the bike from flipping over on top of you... And on the flat, you'd be riding so slow, you'd prolly fall over!

  5. #205
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOPJIMMY71
    I'm with you... I think this (12-36T) is perfect for runnning 1X9 with a 32T chainring on a 29er... I can't imagine the need for a 36T cog with a 22T chainring... on any size wheel... if you need a gear that easy, you're either too out of shape, or the "cliff" you're riding up is so steep, you wouldn't be able to keep the bike from flipping over on top of you... And on the flat, you'd be riding so slow, you'd prolly fall over!

    Currently, I am running a 11-37 Sram (soon to be 11-38) Cass. with a 27t in front (1 X 9) in central TX.(steep, chunky but short) but when I travel out West, I will add a 20t to the crank, and use the 20, 34 combo a lot in a 4 to 6hr ride.

    Are you still with me

  6. #206
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOPJIMMY71
    I'm with you... I think this (12-36T) is perfect for runnning 1X9 with a 32T chainring on a 29er... I can't imagine the need for a 36T cog with a 22T chainring... on any size wheel... if you need a gear that easy, you're either too out of shape, or the "cliff" you're riding up is so steep, you wouldn't be able to keep the bike from flipping over on top of you... And on the flat, you'd be riding so slow, you'd prolly fall over!
    wouldn't you shift back up on the flats

    I can't say I'd use a gear that low either, but I also know better than to assume everyone is the same as me

  7. #207
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRUZED
    Currently, I am running a 11-37 Sram (soon to be 11-38) Cass. with a 27t in front (1 X 9) in central TX.(steep, chunky but short) but when I travel out West, I will add a 20t to the crank, and use the 20, 34 combo a lot in a 4 to 6hr ride.

    Are you still with me

    Have you any pics of that set-up?

  8. #208
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    Quote Originally Posted by bonesetter2004
    Have you any pics of that set-up?
    The pictures I have turned out fuzzy. I will take some more and post them in a few days.

  9. #209
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    Anyone know if this cassette is okay to use with a Hadley hub, as it has a titanium cassette carrier? Will it gouge the carrier?

  10. #210
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    Quote Originally Posted by wankel
    Anyone know if this cassette is okay to use with a Hadley hub, as it has a titanium cassette carrier? Will it gouge the carrier?
    I'm sure it will work with the Hadley's. The reason that cassettes gouge the softer metal (ti and Alu) freehub bodies is due to the the individually mounted cogs. These are the gogs that are not mounted on the spider or the cassette assembly. In the case of the lower end cassettes, most of the gogs are mounted to the assembly. If you've ever mounted an Ultegra 10 spd cassette you'd notice that only the first three cogs are mounted on a spider. The remaining 7 cogs are loose and will gouge your freehub. I've gone through three freehub bodies on my road bike in the last five years. That's 50 bucks for each CK freehub body!

  11. #211
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    I'm building a 1x9 for my wife from a bunch of used stuff and considering swapping out the 11-34 to the 12-36 to help her on hills. I'm keeping it 1x9 for now so she can get used to shifting which she's never really done before so having lower gearing will help even if it is only 2 more teeth.

  12. #212
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    Quote Originally Posted by bonesetter2004
    Have you any pics of that set-up?





  13. #213
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    Quote Originally Posted by palmermtb
    I'm sure it will work with the Hadley's. The reason that cassettes gouge the softer metal (ti and Alu) freehub bodies is due to the the individually mounted cogs. These are the gogs that are not mounted on the spider or the cassette assembly. In the case of the lower end cassettes, most of the gogs are mounted to the assembly. If you've ever mounted an Ultegra 10 spd cassette you'd notice that only the first three cogs are mounted on a spider. The remaining 7 cogs are loose and will gouge your freehub. I've gone through three freehub bodies on my road bike in the last five years. That's 50 bucks for each CK freehub body!
    The cogs on this SLX 12-36 cassette are basically loose cogs though. Just being pinned together isn't enough to make up for their much narrower width or to make them all contact with even pressure

  14. #214
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperJETT
    I'm building a 1x9 for my wife from a bunch of used stuff and considering swapping out the 11-34 to the 12-36 to help her on hills. I'm keeping it 1x9 for now so she can get used to shifting which she's never really done before so having lower gearing will help even if it is only 2 more teeth.
    Why not getting a 30t instead of 32t in front? Will save you 100g, cheaper then a new cassette, add clearance...
    30/11 > 32/12, 30/34 < 32/36 - sounds like a win.

  15. #215
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    Why not getting a 30t instead of 32t in front? Will save you 100g, cheaper then a new cassette, add clearance...
    30/11 > 32/12, 30/34 < 32/36 - sounds like a win.
    That does sound like a win all around, thanks.

  16. #216
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    Why not getting a 30t instead of 32t in front? Will save you 100g, cheaper then a new cassette, add clearance...
    30/11 > 32/12, 30/34 < 32/36 - sounds like a win.
    right now the larger cassette is a much cheaper and easier option though. Less than $50 for a cassette that pops right on versus a $100 ring that may require grinding down the ends of the crank arms. I guess if you're building from scratch you can look at older cranks with different BCDs or at spider-less SS cranks

  17. #217
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    right now the larger cassette is a much cheaper and easier option though. Less than $50 for a cassette that pops right on versus a $100 ring that may require grinding down the ends of the crank arms. I guess if you're building from scratch you can look at older cranks with different BCDs or at spider-less SS cranks
    $62 - 28g.


  18. #218
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    $62 - 28g.
    Thanks for the heads-up. I didn't know those existed, but in my defense I don't really follow all that weight weenie stuff

    That would still require filing the crank arms, but that really isn't to bad. It is cool to see more affordable options though

  19. #219
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    Quote Originally Posted by 29erchico
    I'm running 36-28-19 teef in the front. Still like the 12-36 cassette. Most of my steep climbing these days happens in the 19t front and 28t rear cogs. Much less cross chain effect, than being on the biggest rear cog, for less chain wear. The 32 & 36 teef rear cogs are used somewhat sparingly and most often on the shallower sections for recovery before the next steep pitch.
    I live in the Midwest where a granny isn't necessary so I run 29tx11/34 1x9 steez. When I know I need to climb I add a 20t...never found a situation where I wanted to run 20tx34t. At that pace I prefer to hike a bike as it's faster.

    I've never seen a pinned cassette that doesn't trash Al freehub bodies...the bigger the rear cog, the worse the problem...
    Professional Amateur. Disagree? Submit your grievances here.

  20. #220
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    right now the larger cassette is a much cheaper and easier option though. Less than $50 for a cassette that pops right on versus a $100 ring that may require grinding down the ends of the crank arms. I guess if you're building from scratch you can look at older cranks with different BCDs or at spider-less SS cranks
    Or just buy brand new Middleburn or Surly cranks in 94bcd.

    Pretty soon that next-level 15-spd, 11/52t cassette is going to make a Rohloff look light!
    Professional Amateur. Disagree? Submit your grievances here.

  21. #221
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soupboy
    Or just buy brand new Middleburn or Surly cranks in 94bcd.
    Ah yes, that sounds like the cheapest option yet

  22. #222
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    i've heard from fairly reliable sources that you ride better after a big hill if you can manage to pedal the whole thing. When you get off and walk lactic acid accumulates in the cycling specific parts of your leg muscles. You're out there to pedal not walk or run, i like my lowest gear sometimes to rest for an especially difficult section that might take a sprint in a higher gear to get through, or sometimes i just go to the low gear near the top of a long climb and hangout , wait for people to catch up. If 20-34 is to low there's always 20-30 or 20-26....

  23. #223
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    Quote Originally Posted by herbn
    i've heard from fairly reliable sources that you ride better after a big hill if you can manage to pedal the whole thing. When you get off and walk lactic acid accumulates in the cycling specific parts of your leg muscles. You're out there to pedal not walk or run, i like my lowest gear sometimes to rest for an especially difficult section that might take a sprint in a higher gear to get through, or sometimes i just go to the low gear near the top of a long climb and hangout , wait for people to catch up. If 20-34 is to low there's always 20-30 or 20-26....
    Personally, I did not find that to be true during adventure races. Hike-a-bikes actually helped me to recover - but then those had been long hike-a-bikes (as in an hour or so on occasion), and I am not a finely tuned athlete..

  24. #224
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    Quote Originally Posted by herbn
    i've heard from fairly reliable sources that you ride better after a big hill if you can manage to pedal the whole thing. When you get off and walk lactic acid accumulates in the cycling specific parts of your leg muscles. You're out there to pedal not walk or run, i like my lowest gear sometimes to rest for an especially difficult section that might take a sprint in a higher gear to get through, or sometimes i just go to the low gear near the top of a long climb and hangout , wait for people to catch up. If 20-34 is to low there's always 20-30 or 20-26....
    yeah I've noticed that. A race near me features some killer climbs well into the race including one is not really ridable. Two years in a row I've cramped up immediately upon finishing the long hike-a-bike and trying to get back on the saddle. The root cause is obviously stupid planning on my part with water and nutrients though

  25. #225
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    I have to agree with Soupboy.
    I never find myself using 22t front x 34t back, rarely in 30t back. So I move to 1x9 setup like XC legend Geoff Kabush, and have been riding happily since!
    Remove front derailluer, shifter, cable and 2 front chain rings: -1.1 lb.
    Replaced with Kenda SB8 tires and Maxxis FLight tubes : -0.9 lb.
    Replaced with lighter Fox 100r fork: -0.9 lb.
    I found myself riding about 3 lb less and not failed a climb I've done before. A few situations I knew an extra gear would help, but at that pace, I too prefer to hike a bike as it is faster.
    Don't think this 36t will help you ride up, nor does Sram's new 2x10 setup!

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