Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    29

    My first 'real' bike: Trek Wahoo 29er (GF same thing?)

    Disclaimer: I am a noob. I've gotten back into biking over the past month and am ready to stop riding the 13" no-namer I borrowed but never gave back to my sister, and upgrade to my first 'real' bike. I've put about 100 miles on the no-namer (26in MTB, non working front suspension), including local single track (GREAT TIMES!!!).

    Please don't make this a post about why I should spend $1000.00 and get a real bike, as Im looking to spend around $500.00 and think that any LBS 29er beginning bike is going to be far superior to anything I purchase at a local chain store.

    All that being said, I have decided through multiple visits at my LBS and others that I want to purchase the Trek Wahoo at $529.00 (2010/11 model Black/red). The shop offers lifetime maintenance for free and does all the warranty work without hassle. I prefer to not buy online/CL etc.

    QUESTION: When I am looking this bike up online I see the Trek Wahoo and the Gary Fisher Wahoo. Both are around the same price ($559 vs. $579) but the GF has a lock out. What are the other differences? Is it worth searching out a LBS that sells the pure GF version? (I understand somewhat that Trek makes GF bikes?)

    Thanks for your input.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    76
    Gary Fisher and Trek are the same thing. Trek has owned Fisher bikes for many years. Over the past two years the Gary Fisher Bikes have become named "Trek - Gary Fisher Collection" and some to just Trek. So if you find a bike or webiste talking about a bike that has a big "Gary Fisher" on the down tube, its an old model. The 2012 Model has a big "Trek" on the sides of the down tube and is either blue witha white Trek logo or black with a red Trek logo. Trek web site has the 2012 models.

    The 2011 model is blue and black and will have the Trek logo on the down tube, but its facing the front tire and hard to see from the sides. The 2010 Wahoo (last one with "Gary Fisher" logo) was green.

    Both the the 2011 and 2012 Wahoo are part of the Fisher Collection.

    To see all the previous year models go to the Trek Website and look at the Bike Archives link way down on the bottom of the page in small text.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    438
    Trek has owned Gary Fisher bikes for some time now, but recently GF was formally merged with Trek. Now GF bikes are marketed as Trek ("Gary Fisher Collection"), so it makes sense that the old GF Wahoo (2010) is now a Trek Wahoo (2011).

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    29
    So if I'm seeing a GF Wahoo with Lockout, it must be a 2010, and the LBS is selling the 2011's. Thanks for the info.

    Are lock outs a necessity?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BoomerBrian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    385
    Personally I don't think the Wahoo is very good value. It has single walled rims and very cheap components. My buddy bought one and destroyed it a week in. He returned it for the Mamba which is a much better bike. If 500 is your limit you might want to look around and make sure the Wahoo is your best choice.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by BoomerBrian View Post
    Personally I don't think the Wahoo is very good value. It has single walled rims and very cheap components. My buddy bought one and destroyed it a week in. He returned it for the Mamba which is a much better bike. If 500 is your limit you might want to look around and make sure the Wahoo is your best choice.
    I've heard and good and the bad about the Wahoo. One of the complaints from others is the single walled rim, but I don't know enough about bikes, rims or components to really know if its a good value. What alternative $500.00 range 29er's would you suggest for research?

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    438
    Quote Originally Posted by rnc_forever View Post
    Are lock outs a necessity?
    I never use mine. Maybe if you're riding on the pavement a lot, or if the front end bouncing around when you're standing and pedaling bothers you.

    If I knew then what I know now....... I would have bought a rigid, single speed 29er.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by BmoreKen View Post
    If I knew then what I know now....... I would have bought a rigid, single speed 29er.
    Why is that?

  9. #9
    davidcarson48
    Guest
    You can get a quality rigid SS for $500 because the drivetrain is so simple and there is no suspension fork. You really need to spend at least $700-$800 to get a quality geared bike. In the Trek/GF line, I'd go for the Cobia at least.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    29
    Don't think a SS will work for me. I still plan to ride the bike around town and on the local 26 mile rail trail with non MTB friends.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    13
    Well i got my 2011 trek 4500 disc for 600 and its a quality geared bike but your right about the fork- all the way up until like 1400 bucks you get suntour forks o well planning to change mine

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1
    Yo rnc, I was pretty much in the same boat. Used a buddy's bike three weeks ago and convinced myself to buy a used bike on Craig's. My price range was around 400. My plan was to get a 4-5 year old nicer bike(at the time), used, for around that price. The more I looked into it, I realized that what I would probably end up upgrading the components, fork, bars, etc in the near future... I found a practically brand new 2011 Mamba for 675(50 miles on it, guy bought and needed back surg right away). So glad that I bit, because just bumping up a few steps in price really makes a difference in my experience(and finding a decent listing). I got a great bike with a great frame that I can eventually build but definitely don't see anytime in the near future for now.

    *Full disclaimer, I am definitely a noob so take my advice for what it is worth. You've come to a great place for veteran advice. OG's certainly jump in*

    First post and I love this forum. Great place!
    Last edited by HouseJunkieXXL; 10-03-2011 at 06:13 PM.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    438
    Quote Originally Posted by davidcarson48 View Post
    You can get a quality rigid SS for $500 because the drivetrain is so simple and there is no suspension fork. You really need to spend at least $700-$800 to get a quality geared bike. In the Trek/GF line, I'd go for the Cobia at least.
    Ditto this. The Cobia's a good bike. Or you might be able to score a Kona Unit (rigid singlespeed) for a decent price and have the LBS install a rear derailleur. A worry would be to spend $500 on a bike only to have to spend another $200 within a year on broken/failed components and labor costs, thus bringing you up to the Cobia range. You might be able to score a marked-down 2011, since 2012 bikes should be coming out relatively soon.

    Mountain biking has a somewhat high startup cost (not as much as diving or sailing but certainly more than hiking or running), but quality gear will last. This is a frustrating reality about the sport, and probably a big reason why mountain biking isn't more popular than it is.

    We had a regular weeknight ride over the summer, and one guy showed up with a full suspension mongoose, probably a $200-$300 bike. He was a decent rider, strong, but every week he had another component fail. Usually drivetrain/derailleur issues.

    I'm not trying to talk you out of the Wahoo. Seems like a decent enough bike for riding rail trails and such, but the components might not hold up to trail riding/abuse. If you have a hard limit on the amount you can spend, then there's not much else you can do, but it might be more economical in the long run to try and stretch your dollar a little bit more if you can swing it.

    Good luck!

  14. #14
    XC Baker
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    37
    Yes a self professed noob probably does not want a SS. The only time I ever used a lockout was when I semi-retired my old S-Works in part because the old fork was loosening up and it tracks a little better locked out. I have remote lock-out on my new 29er HT and never use it...

    My first mtb was an inexpensive chrome-moly Raleigh. It weighed a ton and I rode it everywhere... I think you are on the right track with a reputable brand name and a good LBS (as long as they have been around for a while & will be for a while more).

    Good luck!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    24
    I was in your shoes 4 months ago and ended up buying a 2011 Trek Wahoo (Gary Fisher Collection). It's been a great starter bike and I haven't broken anything yet. Nevertheless, I am not a fan of the Tektro Novela disc brakes or the Suntour fork. If I could do it again I'd get a Trek Mamba. Good luck.

    Quote Originally Posted by rnc_forever View Post
    Disclaimer: I am a noob. I've gotten back into biking over the past month and am ready to stop riding the 13" no-namer I borrowed but never gave back to my sister, and upgrade to my first 'real' bike. I've put about 100 miles on the no-namer (26in MTB, non working front suspension), including local single track (GREAT TIMES!!!).

    Please don't make this a post about why I should spend $1000.00 and get a real bike, as Im looking to spend around $500.00 and think that any LBS 29er beginning bike is going to be far superior to anything I purchase at a local chain store.

    All that being said, I have decided through multiple visits at my LBS and others that I want to purchase the Trek Wahoo at $529.00 (2010/11 model Black/red). The shop offers lifetime maintenance for free and does all the warranty work without hassle. I prefer to not buy online/CL etc.

    QUESTION: When I am looking this bike up online I see the Trek Wahoo and the Gary Fisher Wahoo. Both are around the same price ($559 vs. $579) but the GF has a lock out. What are the other differences? Is it worth searching out a LBS that sells the pure GF version? (I understand somewhat that Trek makes GF bikes?)

    Thanks for your input.

  16. #16
    29er for life!!
    Reputation: NCMt.Biker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    168
    I got a 2012 Wahoo 29er and it does fine,yes it has cheap stuff but you can upgrade later.The frame on the wahoo is the same on all the 2012 trek/GF HT 29ers,you just get better componets the more $$$ you put out

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by imero View Post
    I was in your shoes 4 months ago and ended up buying a 2011 Trek Wahoo (Gary Fisher Collection). It's been a great starter bike and I haven't broken anything yet. Nevertheless, I am not a fan of the Tektro Novela disc brakes or the Suntour fork. If I could do it again I'd get a Trek Mamba. Good luck.
    How much have you guys had to pay for the Wahoo at your LBS?

    What are the problems with the brakes?

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chuyler1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    161
    I just picked up a 2010 Wahoo Disc for $475 on Craigslist. It's a 26er with a black/white frame and Gary Fisher Logo. I wasn't really interested in a 29er and just wanted something with low miles and disc brakes.

    I was very surprised to find out later that the Gary Fisher name is no longer on the bikes and there isn't a single 26" GF. My last bike (10 years ago) was a Gary Fisher Big Sur. At the time GF was a big name. I'm surprised Trek has pushed the name aside...but I guess a lot can happen in 10 years.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    29
    Thanks for all the posts guys. I'm leaning towards the Marlin now for the sake of double walled rims only. Did a demo day today and the LBS basically talked me out of the Wahoo saying theirs keep coming back for bent/broke rims?

    Have any of you had problems with the wheels?

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chuyler1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    161
    I've put about 50 miles of New England rocky XC trails on my Wahoo since I picked it up. Wheels are fine. I'm running about 38 psi on the tires. I'd consider myself an intermediate rider and I weigh 195 lbs. I ride quick, but not reckless.

    I think if you ride either of the bikes as if it were a $4,000 bike, something is bound to break. However, if you ride it like a beginner/intermediate then you'll be fine. I think your LBS sales rep was just pointing out the differences between the bikes. All bikes come in for repair. One sales person's observations certainly isn't the be-all-end-all bike review. The Wahoo is still on their showroom floor and hundreds (or thousands) of other riders are enjoying them without the wheels falling off.

    Also consider this.... If you really enjoy mountain biking, this will not be the last bike you purchase. Do you want to spend more on this bike, or do you want to bank that extra cash for when you upgrade to something nicer down the road?

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    29
    Good points. Decisions, decisions...

  22. #22
    Currently in Exile
    Reputation: Frozenspokes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,283
    Spend the extra cash up front. It will cost you more in the long run to upgrade to the same component level as the next bike up the food chain. Especially when you start talking about replacing wheels.
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chuyler1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    161
    It is true, you'll spend more to upgrade...but I guess what my thinking was...my next bike won't be a hard tail. So I spent a modest amount of money on a Wahoo to get me onto the trails again. When my ability surpasses that of the bike, I'll be ready to spend a lot more than $1,000 on a new bike.

Similar Threads

  1. First REAL bike - Cannondale SL4 vs Trek Mamba
    By Rugae in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-04-2011, 04:28 PM
  2. Trek Navi 3.0: My first 'real' bike, and a question...
    By Splnkr in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-22-2008, 06:32 PM
  3. I know it's not the real thing but...
    By lv2ride in forum Idaho, Montana, Wyoming
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-10-2007, 07:12 PM
  4. Trek 4300 or GF Wahoo?
    By drpcken in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-05-2006, 07:31 AM
  5. Thudbuster ST - Better Than the Real Thing?
    By Speedub.Nate in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 12-18-2004, 08:47 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •