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  1. #1
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! My acquaintance's 39T custom cassette

    Good evening to you

    My acquaintance's 39T custom cassette just rolled tonight on the snow&ice shrouded whereabouts.
    What about yours 39T Actiontec or other cassettes what about clearances for long cages derelaiieurs?
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  2. #2
    Witty McWitterson
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    Why?

    //furst!
    Just a regular guy.

  3. #3
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    dang that is epic. You guys climbing the Tatra mountains straight up over there?
    Try this: HTFU

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    my track stand is faster than that!
    Grand claims demand grand proof.

  5. #5
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    Actually, a 39T is pretty useful on a snow bike. I often want something lower than 22x34. I'll probably just get a 20T granny, but still, that's not that big of a change.

  6. #6
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    Perhaps Alps more- some of us.

  7. #7
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    This is a good thing for riding in Korea where switchbacks are as rare as a good Korean beer (or Korean blond) and the traction is good.

  8. #8
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    how does that SLX derailleur mesh with those large gears?

    Color me intrigued..
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by HardTail29er
    my track stand is faster than that!
    I don't care who you are....that's funny right there
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  10. #10
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    He buys an Actiontec cassette and doesn't spring for a new chain?
    If you're lucky enough to be in the mountains,
    you're lucky enough.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher
    how does that SLX derailleur mesh with those large gears?

    Color me intrigued..
    As far as I know It clears 38 whereas interferes with 39T. You just need longer screws to adjust the cage range or something like that and then it works fine- how fine? I'll ask the owner and will keep up updated. The teeth are a bit too protuding and steep.
    It will be used on 3x8/9 or 2x9 or even 1x9.
    For a 29er 20x39 on AM 16 kg is needed on over 30% ascends. That's where the difference pop in- either walking or riding.

  12. #12
    Always Learning
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidcopperfield
    Good evening to you

    My acquaintance's 39T custom cassette just rolled tonight on the snow&ice shrouded whereabouts.
    What about yours 39T Actiontec or other cassettes what about clearances for long cages derelaiieurs?
    Coolio. Nice to see one of the Action-Tec large cassette rings. That matches a 203mm brake rotor quite well.

  13. #13
    is buachail foighneach me
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    if the hill is steep enough to warrant a 39t cog, how do you keep from wheelieing(wheelying? wheeliing?)?? i have trouble imagining not getting really, really bored at that speed.

  14. #14
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    39th cassette? I'm not even a *real* racer and I have no problem with a 32 as my biggest cog.

    If you need a 22 x 39 as your lowest gear...... words fail.

  15. #15
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    Copperfield you better get a new user name cause these guys are on you like flies on S$!T.

  16. #16
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    All comments apply Why The FVCK try going to the supermarket and buying some food and gainning some muscle or something I have enough trouble going at speed my 24-34 my granny/granny combo gives me and balancing and we definitely don't have switchbacks here.

    David, David, david you are contradicting yourself here according to you 29ers are the holy grail, the 2nd coming, they let you do everything better and yet here you are looking for a serious crutch to put on your 29er. (if you have one, still not 100% on that). You know what I found when I got a 29er, I found I could actually, (with the taller effective gearing) still push a taller gear combo than I did before on my 26er - guess you're not as devote as you say you are and 29ers do have draw backs

    it's like a damn wreck, you know you shouldn't and yet you still do
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  17. #17
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    Whats the smallest chainring on the bike that wears this cassette?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by playpunk
    39th cassette? I'm not even a *real* racer and I have no problem with a 32 as my biggest cog.

    If you need a 22 x 39 as your lowest gear...... words fail.

    Did he say it would for certain be used with a 22 granny?

    Here's what he said...

    It will be used on 3x8/9 or 2x9 or even 1x9.

    I can think of some 1 x 9 and 2 x 9 combinations that make sense to me for one of the Action-Tec larger rear cassette cogs (36, 38 or 39T). I ran a 2x9 with a 29T/42T last year up front and an 11-34 in the rear. There were times I could see having a 36 or 38 cog in the rear with the 29T up front would have saved my legs on the out of saddle steep, steep sustained climbs. And I've ridden stuff in the Alps and in California that a 20T granny and a 34T rear cog could not handle. Plenty of challenges out there and I find it difficult to criticize other riders when we don't know what they face.

    I can also think of some combinations that make sense to run a 12-27 Dura Ace cassette in the rear with some chainrings in the front that you might find odd.

    Lots of choices and options available.

    There are climbs out there that would have you questioning your 32 cog in the rear, big time.

    BB

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown
    Plenty of challenges out there and I find it difficult to criticize other riders when we don't know what they face.BB
    I agree BB. Every time someone talks about low gears the boys from Indiana, Iowa and such chime in with "WTF? grow a pair" I'm not sure these guys even know what a mountain looks like.
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  20. #20
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by Schmucker
    Actually, a 39T is pretty useful on a snow bike. I often want something lower than 22x34. I'll probably just get a 20T granny, but still, that's not that big of a change.
    You may be surprised at how well it works. I'm a heavy rider and not that strong. I really like the difference the 20t provides.
    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome.

  21. #21
    meh....
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    Coolio! Can't wait to get mine built.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duzitall
    I agree BB. Every time someone talks about low gears the boys from Indiana, Iowa and such chime in with "WTF? grow a pair" I'm not sure these guys even know what a mountain looks like.
    X2..............here we have some steep, loose terrain and some very long climbs. I also like to see people's inventiveness at work, even if I might not need or want it...good to use your brain and think. However, I have found my 29er to allow me to push a taller gear farther than my 26" which really surprised me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Davidcopperfield
    As far as I know It clears 38 whereas interferes with 39T. You just need longer screws to adjust the cage range or something like that and then it works fine- how fine? I'll ask the owner and will keep up updated. The teeth are a bit too protuding and steep.
    It will be used on 3x8/9 or 2x9 or even 1x9...
    Interesting about the adjuster screws. The teeth do look a bit too tall/deep cut and no ramps on the gear sides to help the chain climb up the larger gears......


    Quote Originally Posted by Duzitall
    For a 29er 20x39 on AM 16 kg is needed on over 30% ascends. That's where the difference pop in- either walking or riding.
    What? Please clarify.
    Last edited by Natedogz; 01-08-2009 at 11:32 PM.
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  23. #23
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    Where I am riding marathons (in Norway), it is very steep and a larger than 34T would be useful for 29ers.
    Not only for very long and steep climbs in races, but also when base training when you want to stay in a zone. I agree that I generally can use the same, or even taller, gearing on my 29er compared to the 26er, but I would welcome a 12-36T cassette.

  24. #24
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    This cassette can take away the need for a granny gear, where leaving away the larger front ring is becoming common practice.
    It it works, it works!

    24x39 is more efficient than 20x32, more teeth engaged. If you get 22x39, it's the super short gear many riders secretly want. Not that I see the use for one :-)

    I would just use a 38t front ring and a 12-39t cassette to ride everything.

  25. #25
    meh....
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki
    24x39 is more efficient than 20x32, more teeth engaged. If you get 22x39, it's the super short gear many riders secretly want. Not that I see the use for one :-)
    Exactly. 24 x 39 for the "everyday" rides. Install a smaller granny for the rides with the big climbs.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duzitall
    I agree BB. Every time someone talks about low gears the boys from Indiana, Iowa and such chime in with "WTF? grow a pair" I'm not sure these guys even know what a mountain looks like.
    Seriously? I live in West Virginia. It isn't Colorado or the Alps, but we have plenty of hills - and lots of steep ones.

    I really can't imagine any application where you would NEED a gear that small - even on a snow bike. You might as well be walking. I ride my bike to go as fast as I can on the bike. If I want to go for hours at 2 miles an hour, I'll walk.

    You can spin a 22 x 32 at 3mph. That is SLOW. 22 x 34 is even easier. If you want to run 1x9 or 2x9, I can kind of understand, but I still think for 99.99% of the time standard gearing is enough. 29 x 34 is 24.7 gear inches - 22 x 39 is 16.4. 1.8 v 1.2 % gain ratio.

    I don't get the fascination with easy gears on this board....

  27. #27
    is buachail foighneach me
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duzitall
    I agree BB. Every time someone talks about low gears the boys from Indiana, Iowa and such chime in with "WTF? grow a pair" I'm not sure these guys even know what a mountain looks like.

    did you actually look at any of the naysayers' profiles to see where they're from? i just did, and onle one is from a state that could be considered relatively flat or non-hilly.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by playpunk
    Seriously? I live in West Virginia. It isn't Colorado or the Alps, but we have plenty of hills - and lots of steep ones.

    I really can't imagine any application where you would NEED a gear that small - even on a snow bike. You might as well be walking. I ride my bike to go as fast as I can on the bike. If I want to go for hours at 2 miles an hour, I'll walk.

    You can spin a 22 x 32 at 3mph. That is SLOW. 22 x 34 is even easier. If you want to run 1x9 or 2x9, I can kind of understand, but I still think for 99.99% of the time standard gearing is enough. 29 x 34 is 24.7 gear inches - 22 x 39 is 16.4. 1.8 v 1.2 % gain ratio.

    I don't get the fascination with easy gears on this board....
    Again - it's all about where you live, what terrain you ride and what one wants to accomplish. Maybe you have no fascination of climbing super steep stuff, but many of us do. That's fine if you would rather walk and spend most of your riding just going as fast as you can. Nothing wrong with that.

    Where I currently live, I have no need for a super granny. However, I do ride a few times a year in areas where it is needed. Briones Regional Park in the East Bay around Moraga and Lafayette, California has some killer climbs. I mean sustained killer climbs. Since I have inlaws in the area and I used to live out there, I ride there a few times a year when we are out visiting. I just ride over on the east end of Lafayette and head up the trails which are steep, killer, dusty, loose, dry, steep and literallly breath taking with the views and sense of accomplishment. A lot of reviews of that park and some of the trails leading up to the upper ridges mention the steep pitch, most just say it can't be ridden. Not me. It's a challenge and I ride them, but for my age and maximum heart rate - even 20T x 34T puts me right at max heart rate. This subject has come up many times over the years, and unless you one has ridden those trails - they have no idea what I'm talking about. A few times, other MTBR.com posters have chimed in and supported my claim about these trails and the need for your A game and correct gearing.

    But if you don't live or ride there, forget about it. We can all simply keep doing this....

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/7166535@N05/3182532178/" title="WrongOnTheNet by singingsingletracker, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3486/3182532178_fc91b8e97e_o.jpg" width="300" height="330" alt="WrongOnTheNet" /></a>

    I was in the Black Hills Fat Tire XC Mountain Bike Race last May which was held on some super steep, very technical and very, very narrow singletrack. Due to the muddy conditions leading up to the event, I was unable to pre-ride the entire loop as it needed to dry out for race day. I was on my Dos Niner with a 2 x 9 (29T/42T) Middleburn Duo and an 11-34 out back. After we had been climbing in the first lap for what seemed like about 20 minutes, I was locked behind the wheel of two local riders in front of me to learn the loop from them when I looked ahead and, with what little breath I could muster to speak, I uttered "ya' gotta be kiddin' me!!!". We were headed straight up the fault line of a DH run for a section. The two in front of me dropped into their granny's front and rear and I had nothing to drop into. I made it about 10 feet and had to hop off and attempt to walk/run up the rest of the climb. They almost made it up to the top of the climb, but bailed just before the top. I know I could have made it with proper gearing based on prior successful climbs on such super steep stuff. I've never seen any kind of climbing like that in any other XC race that I have been in, but that's because I'm not riding in the Black Hills or Colorado or the Sierra Nevada, etc... . I'm sure they are out there and I am sure that riders choose appropriate gearing for their needs.

    I used to live in Vienna and ride right out my door up into the Vienna Woods. Straight up the fault line for a sustained 10 - 20 minute climb. I did it on a 26" Trek 8000 using a 20T x 34T combo. Yet, I had to stop and hang on to trees to catch my breath on a couple of the trails before continuing. Again, that's me, my needs and experience on climbing certain specific steep trails. Others may not hit their maximum heart rate and be able to do it with different gearing. Not me.

    So am I wrong? Are others wrong with their desire or need to have a combo that gets them up the super steep challenging climbs? Are they wrong for not wanting to walk?

    Nah. I don't think so. Everybody is right and everybody is and can be happy because there are options out there.

    I am switching from a 29/42 ring combo this season to a 27/40 combo. I will still be running a 11-34 in the rear. But I will bring along another option for the Black Hills and Briones this year.

    BB

    Walk? Screw that. I'll stay on the bike....

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/7166535@N05/2880014201/" title="CycloCrossHill by singingsingletracker, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3152/2880014201_ccdd07f9ab.jpg" width="331" height="500" alt="CycloCrossHill" /></a>

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown

    Walk? Screw that. I'll stay on the bike....

    I remember back in the day, way back now, there was a deal called the mountain tamer quad (still available now-see below), but the premise was that you could mount a rear rear cassette cog to the front of your bike giving you a gearing choice of anywhere from 23T-12T up front.

    Same concept different actuation. Some people need epic gears just like some people need tall handlebars or funky seats or big wheels.



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  30. #30
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    How was the cassette constructed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Davidcopperfield
    Good evening to you

    My acquaintance's 39T custom cassette just rolled tonight on the snow&ice shrouded whereabouts.
    What about yours 39T Actiontec or other cassettes what about clearances for long cages derelaiieurs?

    Can we get a pick of the cassette unmounted and from the back side? peace. A 12-36 cassette would be perfect but im not hot on the idea of floating a 36T single cog off the back of a 12-34 or 32T cassette and tearing up the freewheel.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceBrown
    Again - it's all about where you live, what terrain you ride and what one wants to accomplish. Maybe you have no fascination of climbing super steep stuff, but many of us do. That's fine if you would rather walk and spend most of your riding just going as fast as you can. Nothing wrong with that.

    But if you don't live or ride there, forget about it. We can all simply keep doing this....

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/7166535@N05/3182532178/" title="WrongOnTheNet by singingsingletracker, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3486/3182532178_fc91b8e97e_o.jpg" width="300" height="330" alt="WrongOnTheNet" /></a>

    So am I wrong? Are others wrong with their desire or need to have a combo that gets them up the super steep challenging climbs? Are they wrong for not wanting to walk?

    Nah. I don't think so. Everybody is right and everybody is and can be happy because there are options out there.

    I am switching from a 29/42 ring combo this season to a 27/40 combo. I will still be running a 11-34 in the rear. But I will bring along another option for the Black Hills and Briones this year.

    BB

    Walk? Screw that. I'll stay on the bike....

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/7166535@N05/2880014201/" title="CycloCrossHill by singingsingletracker, on Flickr"><img src="http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3152/2880014201_ccdd07f9ab.jpg" width="331" height="500" alt="CycloCrossHill" /></a>
    I know starting an internet pissing match is stupid, but sometimes I just can't help myself - it's just one of those "my opinion is better than your opinion" moments where I get started and can't stop.

    I do understand why super low gears are nice in some situations - and I really like the simplicity of the 2x9 setup, light what you're running.

    To each his own, and if DC wants to run a 6 inch travel at both ends bike with a Mt Tamer Quad crank and an 11-39 uber cassette, so be it.

  32. #32
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    like has been said, it's all about local terrain. Short steep climbs of course are easy to do in a tall gear. It's the ones that take a half hour or an hour to climb that the low gears are needed. Add in altitude as a big factor as well.

    The guy who ripped up the 15 second steep climb on his 30-32 2x9 low is gonna be flailing on the hour long, 4 mile climb while the guy with the 20-34 will ride right past him totally comfortable.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm
    Can we get a pick of the cassette unmounted and from the back side? peace. A 12-36 cassette would be perfect but im not hot on the idea of floating a 36T single cog off the back of a 12-34 or 32T cassette and tearing up the freewheel.
    Then drop the bucks at Action-Tec for a full rear cassette.

  34. #34
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    I can definitly see a desire for the low gearing this would provide when bikepacking. We have some 2+ hour long climbs here that during regular rides I spend a lot of time on them in my 22/34. Throw on 20lbs of camping gear and a few days of riding before that and I'd definitly need lower than 22/34. I'm actually looking at puting on an Actiontech 20 tooth for this purpose (The cassettes are too $y for me). And I know a lot of people who prefer to walk when the speed gets down below 3 mph, but I'd also much rather stay in the saddle if I can.

    Crawl on!

  35. #35
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    I use 20x34 at least once on almost every ride here.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    The guy who ripped up the 15 second steep climb on his 30-32 2x9 low is gonna be flailing on the hour long, 4 mile climb while the guy with the 20-34 will ride right past him totally comfortable.
    Agreed totally. That's what I experienced. I ended up walking while kiddy wheels ramping up on 22x34, thus 20x36 is indispensable if surface gets rugged.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davidcopperfield
    Agreed totally. That's what I experienced. I ended up walking while kiddy wheels ramping up on 22x34, thus 20x36 is indispensable if surface gets rugged.

    sweet setup!! i've often thought of going with a 38t on the back but the uber $$$ led me to a 20t front ring instead. maybe 20x36, we'll see how this season goes.

    this kind of setup is ideal for 10,000ft.+ in an epic day ride with a big pack.
    what would rainbow unicorn do?

  38. #38
    is buachail foighneach me
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    david, you could get front freewheel cranks for trials and manage an even lower gear.

  39. #39
    jrm
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    You buying?

    Quote Originally Posted by SingingSingleTracker
    Then drop the bucks at Action-Tec for a full rear cassette.
    thats why ill stick to my 58/94 crankset..thanks

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm
    thats why ill stick to my 58/94 crankset..thanks
    They're in the ballpark price wise with XTR, KCNC, Cycle King and other Ti cassettes. The difference being, the Action-Tecs have the larger cog option. Actually anything in the $150 - $300 range for high end cassettes is the norm...

    http://www.comcycle-usa.com/ProductInfo.aspx?id=4645629
    http://www.comcycle-usa.com/ProductInfo.aspx?id=4645621
    Last edited by SingingSingleTracker; 01-09-2009 at 02:57 PM.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by SingingSingleTracker
    Then drop the bucks at Action-Tec for a full rear cassette.
    I don't think there's a carrier with the Action-Tek cassettes (single cogs and spacers), so it would be the same as adding a loose cog to the back of a Shimano or SRAM.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    like has been said, it's all about local terrain. Short steep climbs of course are easy to do in a tall gear. It's the ones that take a half hour or an hour to climb that the low gears are needed. Add in altitude as a big factor as well.

    The guy who ripped up the 15 second steep climb on his 30-32 2x9 low is gonna be flailing on the hour long, 4 mile climb while the guy with the 20-34 will ride right past him totally comfortable.
    All the while both are being passed by the SS'er riding by on 34x20.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by rensho
    All the while both are being passed by the SS'er riding by on 34x20.

    yeah, yeah, I've heard that before and it's really funny to the SSers when I ride past them at 4.3mph when they're walking at 1.6 mph.

    Serious.

    And it's also really funny going down the other side when all they can do is bounce rapidly on their seat and I pedal a nice calm 80rpm past them.

  44. #44
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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    like has been said, it's all about local terrain. Short steep climbs of course are easy to do in a tall gear. It's the ones that take a half hour or an hour to climb that the low gears are needed. Add in altitude as a big factor as well.

    The guy who ripped up the 15 second steep climb on his 30-32 2x9 low is gonna be flailing on the hour long, 4 mile climb while the guy with the 20-34 will ride right past him totally comfortable.

    Quote Originally Posted by rensho
    All the while both are being passed by the SS'er riding by on 34x20.
    While it's funny to say the reality is very few humans can really make that happen on 30 minute + climbs like I have here at home. I live almost in the middle of a federal wildlife refuge with state parks all around. Killer singletrack everywhere but connected by very steep and long climbs. Many people shuttle these climbs in motor vehicles. I do not shuttle.

    I am 51 years old, very overworked and a little overweight. Somedays I ride a 36lb all mountain bike with a full hydropack, tools and spares for a full day of riding. That's alot of shilt to haul up a few thousand feet vert.

    I do prefer to climb my 20lb rigid 29er SS with taller gears while standing and beating it out. But not everyday.

    Yes Sean, Iowa, Indiana, Florida and Barbados are FLAT.

    As for the internet argument...I'm right and your are wrong to disagree
    Quote Originally Posted by turnerbikes View Post
    Of course the easiest way to fix this is to go for a hike.
    DT

  45. #45
    mvi
    mvi is offline
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    I would love a 38x38 gear for my 1x8 XC rig. How can I attach one to the 34 carrier?

  46. #46
    nor
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    Just run it single.

    ron-k.blogspot.com

  47. #47
    Always Learning
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvi
    I would love a 38x38 gear for my 1x8 XC rig. How can I attach one to the 34 carrier?
    You would run the 38 as the granny with a spacer between it and your 34 and drop your little rear cog (whatever it is - an 11T or 12T).

    BB

  48. #48
    Good For You
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    All above posts.

    More importantly.... WTF is up with your friend's excess der. cable?!

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padre
    I use 20x34 at least once on almost every ride here.
    You better not be shaving your legs admitting that kind of stuff.

    BB

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by nor
    Just run it single.

    THREE SPEED FAIL

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