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  1. #1
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    Most fun 29er bike with best handling and mix of plush and climbing

    I have a ST FSR 29er- 2011 model. Looking for something a little (1) more nimble and (2) better climber. I also have a Yelli. Problem with the yelli and Stump jumper is on steep climbs the front wheel comes up. So something that is plush is fine, but I figure too much travel and ill have that front wheel coming up. I love how the yelli handles but in the rough stuff it just jars me too much.

    So I read on another thread about the Pivot 429 carbon, looks sweet with DW link. I have also thought about the Kona Process.

    I can do more travel, but i dont want to be driving a boat either and i figure more travel on a 29er = longer wheel base.

    I ride in So Cal with steep climbs, good loose rocky single track, i also usually keep the wheels on the ground.

    oh... and I am going on a road trip in a week

  2. #2
    DJO
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    I like 100mm of suspension for 29ers. They climb better, feel nimble and are generally faster. I also think carbon is the way to go if it is in the budget. Carbon is incredibly stiff, light and absorbs vibration better than aluminum. The Pivot 429 carbon looks awesome, I love the specs. I would bet that this bike will climb better and be much quicker in single tack trails. I like the short chainstay and general geometry of this bike.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by surftime View Post
    I have a ST FSR 29er- 2011 model. Looking for something a little (1) more nimble and (2) better climber. I also have a Yelli. Problem with the yelli and Stump jumper is on steep climbs the front wheel comes up. So something that is plush is fine, but I figure too much travel and ill have that front wheel coming up. I love how the yelli handles but in the rough stuff it just jars me too much.

    So I read on another thread about the Pivot 429 carbon, looks sweet with DW link. I have also thought about the Kona Process.

    I can do more travel, but i dont want to be driving a boat either and i figure more travel on a 29er = longer wheel base.

    I ride in So Cal with steep climbs, good loose rocky single track, i also usually keep the wheels on the ground.

    oh... and I am going on a road trip in a week
    I live in SoCal too... SC Tallboy and Tallboy LTc are great rigs for these parts. Ibis Ripley and the 429 are also excellent options. Try all before you buy!

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    thanks - planning to check out the Tallboy also!

  5. #5
    Carbon & Ti rule
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    Sounds like a good 100mm bike with 100mm to 120mm fork would suit.

    Jet9 or Jet9 RDO would be great & a 120mm Pike fork would be cool as well.

    The CVA suspension works great, Try some DW link bikes as well.

    What size are you ??

  6. #6
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    i am between a L ad XL - but have L bikes and like them even with short stems. I am 6'2 185 with a 35 inch inseam

  7. #7
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    Interesting. Random thoughts on the subject. . . .

    I have a 2011 Stumpjumper FSR 29er and live in SoCal, but don't really have an issue with the front end coming up on steep climbs. Couple things that may be in my favor compared to other riders:

    1) I like the saddle pushed forward quite a bit.

    2) I am a large humanoid-like creature (250lbs)

    I like that my two bike quiver is a hardtail 29er (w/120mm fork) and the Stumpy 29er. The hardtail is more XC-ish, but not too much so (I really like that extra 20mm travel compared to most 29er hardtails), and then the Stumpy is for days when I want the plusher ride. There is some crossover between the two, but not too much.

    The bike that has my eye these days is the Camber Expert Carbon EVO 29. I have only tooled around the lot on one, but that 120mm Pike is butter.

    The Mach 429 Carbon is very nice, but I'm kind of over the 100mm rear travel FS bikes, and prefer the 120mm to 130mm FS bikes for everyday trail riding. Of course, YMMV. I just don't think that '100mm rear travel' and 'plush' really go together. I can make a somewhat of a case for '120mm' and 'plush', or at least 'plush enough'.

    I have ridden some 120mm or 125mm rear travel 29ers that I would characterize as 'plush'.

    The newest Ellsworth Evolve Carbon with the 120mm rear travel option was one of the plushest bikes I have ridden at any travel. Not sure I'd love that whole bike, but they made 120mm seem bottomless.

    The newest Rip 9 at 130mm felt similarly plush, and with the Fox 34 TALAS on the front, will get you from corner to corner VERY quickly. If only it would corner like a Jet 9. . . . .

    The Yeti SB95 was a nice mix of trail bike. It was very good in most any situation.

    With all that said, if I had to suggest a couple bikes to put up against the Mach 429 Carbon as a trail bike, I would name these two bikes:

    1) Ibis Ripley with 120mm G2 fork

    2) Santa Cruz Tallboy LTc

    If you try those two and can honestly say you prefer the Mach 429 Carbon, then you will have certainly not gone wrong in choosing the Pivot.

  8. #8
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    dang, you have my bike and have done all the test rides for me!! So how does the Stumpy stand up to all those rides, is it as good as most? Close?

    You know how it goes, we have bikes a few years old and think all the new bikes are so much better, but are they?

    Quote Originally Posted by jeffj View Post
    Interesting. Random thoughts on the subject. . . .

    I have a 2011 Stumpjumper FSR 29er and live in SoCal, but don't really have an issue with the front end coming up on steep climbs. Couple things that may be in my favor compared to other riders:

    1) I like the saddle pushed forward quite a bit.

    2) I am a large humanoid-like creature (250lbs)

    I like that my two bike quiver is a hardtail 29er (w/120mm fork) and the Stumpy 29er. The hardtail is more XC-ish, but not too much so (I really like that extra 20mm travel compared to most 29er hardtails), and then the Stumpy is for days when I want the plusher ride. There is some crossover between the two, but not too much.

    The bike that has my eye these days is the Camber Expert Carbon EVO 29. I have only tooled around the lot on one, but that 120mm Pike is butter.

    The Mach 429 Carbon is very nice, but I'm kind of over the 100mm rear travel FS bikes, and prefer the 120mm to 130mm FS bikes for everyday trail riding. Of course, YMMV. I just don't think that '100mm rear travel' and 'plush' really go together. I can make a somewhat of a case for '120mm' and 'plush', or at least 'plush enough'.

    I have ridden some 120mm or 125mm rear travel 29ers that I would characterize as 'plush'.

    The newest Ellsworth Evolve Carbon with the 120mm rear travel option was one of the plushest bikes I have ridden at any travel. Not sure I'd love that whole bike, but they made 120mm seem bottomless.

    The newest Rip 9 at 130mm felt similarly plush, and with the Fox 34 TALAS on the front, will get you from corner to corner VERY quickly. If only it would corner like a Jet 9. . . . .

    The Yeti SB95 was a nice mix of trail bike. It was very good in most any situation.

    With all that said, if I had to suggest a couple bikes to put up against the Mach 429 Carbon as a trail bike, I would name these two bikes:

    1) Ibis Ripley with 120mm G2 fork

    2) Santa Cruz Tallboy LTc

    If you try those two and can honestly say you prefer the Mach 429 Carbon, then you will have certainly not gone wrong in choosing the Pivot.

  9. #9
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    Can't go wrong with any of these
    429 C
    Tallboy LTc
    Rip9
    Rip9RDO
    Jet9RDO
    Ripley

    I promise you would be very happy with any of those

  10. #10
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    Most fun 29er bike with best handling and mix of plush and climbing

    Quote Originally Posted by tws_andrew View Post
    Can't go wrong with any of these
    429 C
    Tallboy LTc
    Rip9
    Rip9RDO
    Jet9RDO
    Ripley

    I promise you would be very happy with any of those
    This post has the appearance of a cop-out, but actually has the highest the highest truthpinion ratio. There are SO many good bikes out there.

    I live in SoCal too and loved my 2014 alloy RIP.
    '14 Lenz Lunchbox
    '08 Gary Fisher Ferrous 29

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by surftime View Post
    dang, you have my bike and have done all the test rides for me!! So how does the Stumpy stand up to all those rides, is it as good as most? Close?

    You know how it goes, we have bikes a few years old and think all the new bikes are so much better, but are they?
    First of all, I was trying to consider your question for your situation. I do get to try out a lot of different bikes, but shelling out hard earned dough for them can be a different kettle of fish depending on personal circumstances. If I was picking a bike for me, I might have a somewhat different list, with other bikes higher on said list FOR ME.

    Personally, I would likely go for a bike that is even more AM-ish than the Stumpjumper, and like I mentioned, I am kind of over the 100mm FS 29er for the riding I do when I have the 120mm hardtail. I have a Giant Anthem X 29er that my son is now riding. It was kind of a redundant system with the 29er hardtail I have (a Trek Stache), and that 120mm travel fork on the Stache did more for me than the rear suspension on the Anthem, hence the move to the Stumpjumper for me.

    The Niner Rip 9 (alloy) with the 4-Star build (w/140 Fox TALAS) was a lot of fun in the rough stuff, but was not horrible to climb with (similar to the Stumpy when climbing, didn't corner quite as well as the Stumpy, BUT WOW! did that thing scoot descending the rough, rutted trails - very confidence inspiring both on and off the ground).

    I think the Turner Sultan is another bike that suits ME quite well. Very confident, and climbs well too.

    I would even consider the Specialized Enduro 29er as a trail bike FOR ME to contrast what I have in a hardtail. If I only could have one main bike, that would probably change to something like the Camber EVO, Tallboy LT, or Ibis Ripley. Probably others I haven't tried that would be great too.

    To confuse the issue even more, there are a few places within 30 to 100 miles of where I live, that if I lived there, I would probably not want a hardtail at all. Horses for courses in some places.

    But your question is about there being enough difference for me to change bikes. There are bikes that do this or that better, and some are better all the way around, but not so much that I feel like I'm at a disadvantage, and I have no plans nor am I itching to switch to something different. Even though it's not perfect, I'm having a blast on the Stumpjumper. The one I have, has the Brain rear shock. It's not super plush, but it's good enough, and I get pretty much full travel with no truly bad traits. The rear suspension works well, and I can tune it to be balanced well with the fork (a REBA) I have. Mine is a frame-up build with nice Stans Flow rims (mated to DT Swiss 240 rear hub and Hope Pro II front hub), XT cranks with a Niner 780mm Flat Top Carbon bar, X.0 10 speed grip shift, X.0 RD, and a 125mm Command Post among other parts.

    Once you get up into a nice enough frame, things like the fork and shock, wheels, etc. can make more difference than the actual frame they are mounted on.

    I also get to ride with some folks that get to test many bikes as well. Most of the time, we just are who we are as riders. Once in a while a bike will have a little more or a little less potential than others, or it just doesn't suit that rider particularly well. If I need to find the biggest inhibitor to my performance potential, I need to go no further than the mirror.

    It's fun to spend other people's money. If you want a new bike, that's your prerogative to do as you please. If people are looking for suggestions for a new bike, I will offer my $0.02.

    But honestly, if you have some budget and mostly like your Stumpjumper, I think you could make some improvements to it and be very happy with the improved performance. A new fork, or having yours tuned by PUSH or someone similar, maybe some new carbon wheels might be things that make your Stumpjumper really sing your song. If you're determined to get some new wheels, I would just strongly suggest you take your time a demo some of the bikes suggested. They are all pretty darned good, but only you know which one really floats your boat.

    If you're going on a road trip soon, maybe you could rent a Mach 429, and then get back to the business of getting a new bike or improving what you have when you get back.

  12. #12
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    The Pivot is nice, but you should also look at the Trek Fuel EX. I've heard that even with the full floater suspension it still climbs very well.
    Big Wheels Keep On Rolling

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  13. #13
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    Loving my 429c, but I wouldn't call it plush, at least compared to some longer travel bikes I've tried. Fast, fun, and very capable in technical terrain.

    Check out the RM Instinct if you're looking for a plush 29er, or if you really want plush, a 6" travel 27.5 like the RM Altitude or Pivot Mach 6.

  14. #14
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    Most fun 29er bike with best handling and mix of plush and climbing

    Speaking of 6" bikes, I just took my Lunchbox on a 4600ft climb to the top of what's a shuttle DH for most bikes, and had a ton of fun doing it. With the ability to tune the LSC and LSR, the Cane Creek DB Air CS is kind of a game changer with regard to what a bigger bike can do when pointed up.
    '14 Lenz Lunchbox
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  15. #15
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    I would look at a Devinci Atlas, to me it has better geometry than the 429, shorter chain stay and shorter wheel base. I have one built out with as a trail bike with a Pike 140 and its a blast with the short CS and WB, almost handles like a 26" bike. It does not climb the best with a 140 fork, but with a 120 should climb great and be a very fun ride.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by surftime View Post
    I have a ST FSR 29er- 2011 model. Looking for something a little (1) more nimble and (2) better climber. I also have a Yelli. Problem with the yelli and Stump jumper is on steep climbs the front wheel comes up. So something that is plush is fine, but I figure too much travel and ill have that front wheel coming up. I love how the yelli handles but in the rough stuff it just jars me too much.
    It might be worth it to make some slight cockpit adjustments to see if you can keep the front end from coming up on climbs. I'm in So Ca too and even on the steepest uphills, my Yelli with a 120mm fork stays put. Unless of course, you just want a new bike!!!
    Vassago Jabberwocky SS
    Santa Cruz Highball
    Canfield Yelli Screamy
    Yeti SB95

  17. #17
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    problem also is my size, being tall and then on a L yelli with the seat way up it sucks for climbing. If you can visualize that seat going up then extending back... But I have a 35 inch inseam and so really i dont need a XL and the long top tube and slower handling. I also have a short stem on the yelli which i am sure does not help

    Quote Originally Posted by kickhorse View Post
    It might be worth it to make some slight cockpit adjustments to see if you can keep the front end from coming up on climbs. I'm in So Ca too and even on the steepest uphills, my Yelli with a 120mm fork stays put. Unless of course, you just want a new bike!!!

  18. #18
    Trail Ninja
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    Intense Spider 29 Comp...

    Actually, you should probably just wait for the SJ FSR 29 redesign, which I feel is due soon. Just speculating since it's been awhile and the Epic, Camber, and Enduro got theirs. Assuming everything they learned so far will go into it, I expect great things. In the meantime, perhaps a new shock (ex. CC DB Inline, if it manages to fit), wheels, tires, fork, etc. and other upgrades can stem your new bike itch.
    Last edited by Varaxis; 07-09-2014 at 02:44 AM.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by surftime View Post
    problem also is my size, being tall and then on a L yelli with the seat way up it sucks for climbing. If you can visualize that seat going up then extending back... But I have a 35 inch inseam and so really i dont need a XL and the long top tube and slower handling. I also have a short stem on the yelli which i am sure does not help
    bingo! you brought up a great point that often gets ignored when talking about chainstay lengths and the rider's mass in relation to the rear axle: as one raises the saddle (i.e. with a longer seatpost or seat tube), the rider's hips/center of mass moves rearward and closer to the rear axle. so taller riders will have their center of mass closer to rear axle than a shorter rider, presuming chainstay lengths don't vary for a specific frame (and as far as i know, only norco's frames with their "gravity tune" increase the chainstay lengths as the frame size increases).

    as a shorter rider (5'8") riding a canfield 29er hardtail with 16.25" chainstays and 67 degree HA w/ 140mm travel fork in the sierras (and occasionally socal), my front end doesn't wander on climbs. but i can see how a taller rider might need longer chainstays to prevent the front end from wandering. i hated the way my 1st generation RIP 9 w/ 17.9" chainstays and 71 degree handled compared to my canfield, which i love.

    obviously, how a bike feels on the trail depends on many more factors than chainstay length, but since you're significantly taller, you might feel better on a 29er with chainstays longer than the yelli.
    Last edited by slo_rider; 07-20-2014 at 05:12 PM.

  20. #20
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    Don't look past the Specialized Enduro 29er. It is the most fun I've had on a bike ever. I was a little worried it was going to be too much bike, but it always feels perfect for every ride. The handling and balance are so dialed.
    Throw some lighter weight rubber and boom its a "trail" bike, throw some heavy weight rubber on it and boom its a big mountain ripper.
    Can't go wrong.
    The most important thing is it will make you a better rider. So confidence inspiring.
    The only drawback is that I like to constantly monkey around with my bikes, and this one just doesn't need any tweaking. Its kinda boring in that regard.
    I live in SOcal too. BTW

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by slo_rider View Post
    bingo! you brought up a great point that often gets ignored when talking about chainstay lengths and the rider's mass in relation to the rear axle: as one raises the saddle (i.e. with a longer seatpost or seat tube), the rider's hips/center of mass moves rearward and closer to the rear axle. so taller riders will have their center of mass closer to rear axle than a shorter rider, presuming chainstay lengths don't vary for a specific frame (and as far as i know, only norco's frames with their "gravity tune" increase the chainstay lengths as the frame size increases).

    as a shorter rider (5'8") riding a canfield 29er hardtail with 16.25" chainstays and 67 degree HA w/ 140mm travel fork in the sierras (and occasionally socal), my front end doesn't wander on climbs. but i can see how a taller rider might need longer chainstays to prevent the front end from wandering. i hated the way my 1st generation RIP 9 w/ 17.9" chainstays and 71 degree handled compared to my canfield, which i love.

    obviously, how a bike feels on the trail depends on many more factors than chainstay length, but since you're significantly taller, you might feel better on a 29er with chainstays longer than the yelli.
    yep you get it, thats my problem. I get XL bikes but then longer top tubes slow it down and really a L works, just with longer legs my post is up high. also running a short stem on the yelli

    Quote Originally Posted by morandi View Post
    Don't look past the Specialized Enduro 29er. It is the most fun I've had on a bike ever. I was a little worried it was going to be too much bike, but it always feels perfect for every ride. The handling and balance are so dialed.
    Throw some lighter weight rubber and boom its a "trail" bike, throw some heavy weight rubber on it and boom its a big mountain ripper.
    Can't go wrong.
    The most important thing is it will make you a better rider. So confidence inspiring.
    The only drawback is that I like to constantly monkey around with my bikes, and this one just doesn't need any tweaking. Its kinda boring in that regard.
    I live in SOcal too. BTW
    ya I always wonder if its too much bike also, that was the reason i was not looking that direction, ill take a second look--thanks

  22. #22
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    Most fun 29er bike with best handling and mix of plush and climbing

    Quote Originally Posted by morandi View Post
    Don't look past the Specialized Enduro 29er. It is the most fun I've had on a bike ever. I was a little worried it was going to be too much bike, but it always feels perfect for every ride. The handling and balance are so dialed.
    Throw some lighter weight rubber and boom its a "trail" bike, throw some heavy weight rubber on it and boom its a big mountain ripper.
    Can't go wrong.
    The most important thing is it will make you a better rider. So confidence inspiring.
    The only drawback is that I like to constantly monkey around with my bikes, and this one just doesn't need any tweaking. Its kinda boring in that regard.
    I live in SOcal too. BTW
    What part of SoCal? Any interest in riding a Lunchbox? I'd love to swap ride an E29.

    /threadjack
    '14 Lenz Lunchbox
    '08 Gary Fisher Ferrous 29

  23. #23
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    Just a quick addition. I bought a Salsa Horsethief 3 a little over a year ago and I love it. The RokShox Monarch R rear shock will eventually be replaced with something a little better, but overall I have never been let down. I live and ride in Washington and ride in the Cascades--rugged, rocky, steep single tracks and long technical climbs--and in the desert--rocky, dry hardpack with occasional slick clay soil during the wet seasons. My Horsethief has handled everything. It is a long-travel bike--130mm RokShox Sektor fork with 120mm of rear travel--and it performs well on everything. When climbing short steeps, I have to stay over the front end a little more than on my old Giant ATX XC bike, but once I got comfortable with it, it has never let me down. On the descents, it is flat out plush! I have ridden my Horsethief and a high-end Ellsworth Evolution (also a 29er--Fox Float CTD front and rear, 120mm travel) on the same trail in identical conditions and the Horsethief was comparable for a lot less money.

    I am 240 lbs, so I am not a small person. I was originally worried that the Monarch rear shock would not perform well for me but I have been pleasantly proven wrong. The bike feels light despite being over 30 lbs and it is a blast on the descents.

  24. #24
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    orange county area - ride the coastal areas of laguna beach a lot as well as the santa ana's, sure let me know and we can switch up bikes

    Quote Originally Posted by slo_rider View Post
    bingo! you brought up a great point that often gets ignored when talking about chainstay lengths and the rider's mass in relation to the rear axle: as one raises the saddle (i.e. with a longer seatpost or seat tube), the rider's hips/center of mass moves rearward and closer to the rear axle. so taller riders will have their center of mass closer to rear axle than a shorter rider, presuming chainstay lengths don't vary for a specific frame (and as far as i know, only norco's frames with their "gravity tune" increase the chainstay lengths as the frame size increases).

    as a shorter rider (5'8") riding a canfield 29er hardtail with 16.25" chainstays and 67 degree HA w/ 140mm travel fork in the sierras (and occasionally socal), my front end doesn't wander on climbs. but i can see how a taller rider might need longer chainstays to prevent the front end from wandering. i hated the way my 1st generation RIP 9 w/ 17.9" chainstays and 71 degree handled compared to my canfield, which i love.

    obviously, how a bike feels on the trail depends on many more factors than chainstay length, but since you're significantly taller, you might feel better on a 29er with chainstays longer than the yelli.
    Quote Originally Posted by morandi View Post
    Don't look past the Specialized Enduro 29er. It is the most fun I've had on a bike ever. I was a little worried it was going to be too much bike, but it always feels perfect for every ride. The handling and balance are so dialed.
    Throw some lighter weight rubber and boom its a "trail" bike, throw some heavy weight rubber on it and boom its a big mountain ripper.
    Can't go wrong.
    The most important thing is it will make you a better rider. So confidence inspiring.
    The only drawback is that I like to constantly monkey around with my bikes, and this one just doesn't need any tweaking. Its kinda boring in that regard.
    I live in SOcal too. BTW
    Quote Originally Posted by kragu View Post
    What part of SoCal? Any interest in riding a Lunchbox? I'd love to swap ride an E29.

    /threadjack

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