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  1. #1
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    Lynskey Ridgeline FS 29. 140

    Hi
    I'm looking into getting a Lynskey Ridgeline FS 29 (previously called the Summit) but there are almost no reviews available.
    Looking at the 140mm travel model because the geometry works better for me. Currently riding a hard tail with 80mm travel.
    Any experiences or thoughts on this bike?
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Why titanium for an FS bike? My opinion on that is that the suspension design should do the flexing, not the frame. Titanium is a poor choice to build FS frames. It's blingy and that's about it.

    I liked Horst link bikes back in the day but they've been eclipsed by much greater designs.

    The geometry is almost right but not quite. The HA is pretty steep for a bike with 140mm of travel.
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    Why titanium for an FS bike? My opinion on that is that the suspension design should do the flexing, not the frame. Titanium is a poor choice to build FS frames. It's blingy and that's about it.
    Titanium will not flex any more than any other material when designed correctly. The advantage of a titanium frame is it's toughness. Given equal design quality, titanium will outlast all other frame materials. Steel corrodes, aluminum is soft and carbon fiber is notch sensitive, UV sensitive and absorbs water.
    Mountain bikers, hikers and horseback riders are not the enemy. Bulldozers are the enemy.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by outside! View Post
    carbon fiber...absorbs water.
    What? You just lost all credibility. Better hurry and let all of the aircraft manufacturers know.
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  5. #5
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    Ti only because I have seven year old Lynskey road bike and pleased with the quality

  6. #6
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    Ti and FS = 👎🏽

    Alum and carbon are WAY better choices.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by outside! View Post
    Titanium will not flex any more than any other material when designed correctly. The advantage of a titanium frame is it's toughness. Given equal design quality, titanium will outlast all other frame materials. Steel corrodes, aluminum is soft and carbon fiber is notch sensitive, UV sensitive and absorbs water.
    BS, plenty of pictures of cracked Ti frames. Frames fail because of overload failure or underload, where some feature, gusset, weld, mount, brace or something else isn't up to the required strength. This usually causes a crack and the cycles take over and make it progress with each cycle. Ti is not immune to any of this. It only has an infinite fatigue life IF all stresses are below the actual limit of the material and design. You won't put enough cycles on a an aluminum frame in 20 years for fatigue life to matter, so the first two problems I mentioned are controlling for aluminum alloy, carbon, steel, or Ti alloy.

    Ti is generally not used for FS because while tubes are relatively easy to get and manipulate, small intricate structures are not with Ti, and the material is more dense than aluminum. Being harder to machine, often the rear end of "Ti" FS bikes are aluminum alloy.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    What? You just lost all credibility. Better hurry and let all of the aircraft manufacturers know.
    All composite structures will absorb moisture. There is a lot of supporting information out there, like this:
    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...ce_of_Moisture
    I was surprised the first time I heard this as well. The US Coast Guard's Dauphin helicopters are all composite and over the years the air frames have absorbed enough water that it has an impact on their range and lifting ability.

    If we take three equally well designed frames, one Al, one Ti and one composite and sit them on a mountain top exposed to the elements for 20 years, and then build them up. I would confidently ride the the Al or Ti frame down the mountain. The composite frame, maybe not so much due to the effects of UV, thermal cycling and water absorption. The two metal frames could probably last centuries on the mountain top and still be serviceable.

    The only advantages that Al has over Ti is cost (both in material and processing) and industry familiarity. Any frame feature/component can be designed to have equal performance out of either material. Ti will be more immune to damage from issues like chain suck, rock dings and corrosion. Just be sure to keep the Ti frame out of pure nitrogen environments, since Ti is the only element that will burn in nitrogen (hence the use of Argon as a shielding gas when welding Ti).

    I currently ride a 2016 carbon FS frame with an Al rear triangle. I just don't expect it to outlast my 1991 Litespeed. The Lynskey frames look to be well made. I have no idea how the suspension performs, but it looks similar to a Transition I rode and like. If I were the OP, I would try to get a test ride.
    Last edited by outside!; 12-05-2016 at 09:38 PM.
    Mountain bikers, hikers and horseback riders are not the enemy. Bulldozers are the enemy.

  9. #9
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    You would have to immerse and soak carbon for it to have any effect. Modern resins greatly negate this affect. It's essentially a non-issue. The basic premise stands however, titanium is not an optimum material for any FS frame.
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by outside! View Post
    All composite structures will absorb moisture. There is a lot of supporting information out there, like this:
    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...ce_of_Moisture
    I was surprised the first time I heard this as well. The US Coast Guard's Dauphin helicopters are all composite and over the years the air frames have absorbed enough water that it has an impact on their range and lifting ability.

    If we take three equally well designed frames, one Al, one Ti and one composite and sit them on a mountain top exposed to the elements for 20 years, and then build them up. I would confidently ride the the Al or Ti frame down the mountain. The composite frame, maybe not so much due to the effects of UV, thermal cycling and water absorption. The two metal frames could probably last centuries on the mountain top and still be serviceable.

    The only advantages that Al has over Ti is cost (both in material and processing) and industry familiarity. Any frame feature/component can be designed to have equal performance out of either material. Ti will be more immune to damage from issues like chain suck, rock dings and corrosion. Just be sure to keep the Ti frame out of pure nitrogen environments, since Ti is the only element that will burn in nitrogen (hence the use of Argon as a shielding gas when welding Ti).

    I currently ride a 2016 carbon FS frame with an Al rear triangle. I just don't expect it to outlast my 1991. The Lynskey frames look to be well made. I have know idea how the suspension performs, but it looks similar to a Transition I rode and like. If I were the OP, I would try to get a test ride.
    You can rest easy that your titanium frame will not spontaneously combust in a pure nitrogen environment.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by outside! View Post
    All composite structures will absorb moisture. There is a lot of supporting information out there, like this:
    https://www.researchgate.net/publica...ce_of_Moisture
    I was surprised the first time I heard this as well. The US Coast Guard's Dauphin helicopters are all composite and over the years the air frames have absorbed enough water that it has an impact on their range and lifting ability.
    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic is not the same as the CF MTB frames use that require vacuum bags, etc. Let me say it again, it's not the same thing. Second, there are enough CFRP, CF and composite structures being used in aerospace to know this is not a widespread issue. In fact, I'm attending a helicopter accident investigation course as we speak. If this was impacting helicopters on a large scale, it would be causing crashes everywhere due to being over gross weight. These things are plotted very carefully by the ntsb, who figures out the required power for accident sequences, and when things don't add up, they dig until they find the issue.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  12. #12
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    And all this said, an FS frame can be made from Ti and work just fine, it's just that it's a lot more expensive, heavier, and not any more durable. You hope they "do it right" and use tubing sizes that result in a stiff frame and many of the attempts, from reputable companies, have been poor in this regard. As was said above, the current Lynskey design doesn't really stand out as having excellent suspension kinematics and things like the pivots, bearings, mounts, interfaces, etc., are more important than whether it's Ti or aluminum...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    And all this said, an FS frame can be made from Ti and work just fine, it's just that it's a lot more expensive, heavier, and not any more durable. You hope they "do it right" and use tubing sizes that result in a stiff frame and many of the attempts, from reputable companies, have been poor in this regard. As was said above, the current Lynskey design doesn't really stand out as having excellent suspension kinematics and things like the pivots, bearings, mounts, interfaces, etc., are more important than whether it's Ti or aluminum...
    Can we please end the thread with this post 👍

  14. #14
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    I actually own a lynskey FS

    I ride a lot of different bikes, but I traded my old lynskey hard tail for the FS29 120. Amazing. Most the posts in this thread were sadly misinformed. The geometry is amazing, the suspension is plush, yet efficient, and the frame has a lifetime warranty, so let's see the carbon and aluminum bigots respond to that one.
    I just crushed Moab trails on this bike. Yes, it weighs about a quarter pound more than my carbon bike.

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