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  1. #26
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    I understand what you guys are getting at and DLd thanks for the very in depth info the haha.
    Cpfitness I do come from a very extensive background of bmx, even freestyle park competitions. So for that reason I have that particular feel that I want from my bike that other might not. I'm 6ft and on the road I'm pretty comfortable with my saddle and my bars being even, just did 13 miles like that and it wasn't an issue. But I do slam it on the trails. Hit the trails yesterday and was jumping everything I came across. But to be honest I can ride on the road without a seat at all. I've spent ten years pedaling standing up on my trick bikes, so a multi geared bike is cake.

  2. #27
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    I hear ya. IF you were on a road bike, there would be the issue of aerodynamics as well. at the end of the day, set the bike up however makes you comfortable. I'm a newbie to mtb and am not used to the feeling of going over the bars while descending so I definately have my bars up a bit higher than most.

  3. #28
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    If it was a road bike the seat would def be up high .

  4. #29
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    How's your handlebar drop?

    Quote Originally Posted by dirtdan View Post
    Just curious what level everyone's handlebars are compared to their seat. On my Tallboy LTc, they are pretty much dead even. I'm about to start toying with putting them a little lower to make climbing a little more awesome. I'm curious to hear others' stories on finding their happy spot in regards to handlebar/seat relationship.
    "Everyone's" setup is different.

    Mine varies, with the top of my dropbars level with to ~3" below my max saddle height. And I spend most of my time in the drops.
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  5. #30
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    The bike handles more precisely and corners better, due to a balance of weight and lower CG, when the stem is slammed and the bars are as low as possible. All you have to do is look at World Cup XC racers' setup: irregardless of rider height, they always have the bars as low as possible, and the seat raised to the level of most efficient leg extension.

    So, the saddle-bar drop is going to be greater for taller riders. This is offset by longer arms on a taller body however. The descending tips listed above are good, but a slammed bar height does require greater descending skill.

    I think the low bar scenario makes up for some greater Over-the-bars tendencies by relieving some of the stress of picking your way through rock gardens. Since the bars are lower, it's not as scary. You can always drop your ass behind the saddle on steep descents.

    Last edited by chomxxo; 03-01-2013 at 09:08 PM.

  6. #31
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    Interesting replies. Thanks all!

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