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  1. #1
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    How hard is bikesdirect's bike assembly?

    So after stopping biking for roughly 10 years, I am ready to jump back into the sport for leisure. Been lurking the forums a lot for the pass few weeks and have decided to purchase a Motobecane Fantom 29er Elite and have couple of questions if I may please get some assistance.

    1) How difficult is the assembly for someone who hasn't build many things? I have absolutely no problem assembling furnitures and computers etc but never anything with moving parts.

    2) Would you recommend me paying a bike service center $150+ to assemble a bike?

    3) Does a brand new bike require tuning etc? If I do decide to assemble myself, would I still have to drop it off at a LBS for tuning?


    ** I would post the link to the bike but I'm not allow to post links.

  2. #2
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    Pay a pizza to a friend unless do you to bleed the brakes you can assembly in home

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  3. #3
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    Wish the had a friend that's into mountain biking =(

    Is it required to bleed the brakes on a brand new bike?

  4. #4
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    Its not hard. BUT, assembling a bike correctly is more than just slapping on the front wheel and straightening the stem - to do it right there are lots of small things that should be done. Honestly, based on your description, pay ~$75 and have a shop do it. $150 sounds way high. We typically charged the price of a tune-up at the shop I worked at to assemble a bike.
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  5. #5
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    This site might help.
    Shop Talk

    If you have to start paying for assembly help and/or tuning it might end up being cheaper to buy a bike from a local shop. They come assembled and tuned and often with a period of free servicing.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  6. #6
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    Omg... In Brazik this service cost less 20bucks.... I go to USA to assembly bikes

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    Its not hard. BUT, assembling a bike correctly is more than just slapping on the front wheel and straightening the stem - to do it right there are lots of small things that should be done. Honestly, based on your description, pay ~$75 and have a shop do it. $150 sounds way high. We typically charged the price of a tune-up at the shop I worked at to assemble a bike.
    Oh wow, I've call around a few shops and all have quoted me $100+. R.e.i wanted close to $200

    On a side note- Does anyone around the Atlanta area know of a reputable bike shop that will do it for a reasonable price?

    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    This site might help.


    If you have to start paying for assembly help and/or tuning it might end up being cheaper to buy a bike from a local shop. They come assembled and tuned and often with a period of free servicing.
    Excellent! Thanks so much for the link. Too bad I can't reverse the purchase now, it has already been shipped.

  8. #8
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    This stuff is more time than technical challenge.
    The time it takes to finish the assembly and do the initial tune is going to be well spent. LBS techs don't offer trail side assistance. What you learn is what you'll need on the trail.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    This stuff is more time than technical challenge.
    The time it takes to finish the assembly and do the initial tune is going to be well spent. LBS techs don't offer trail side assistance. What you learn is what you'll need on the trail.
    This

    Buy a "cheap" tool kit or a few select tools.
    Plenty of info around on how to work on bikes. Parktool site is good. Lots of you tube videos, ask here. Learn to do it yourself. take your time you will be OK. Enjoy your new bike.
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  10. #10
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    I think some shops dislike people who buy online so they jack up their assembly costs..terrible. Yes, doing it yourself is great and will teach you a lot. Just keep in mind the bike has not been adjusted beyond the quick work done at the factory. The derailleurs and brakes will likely need tweaking. The disc brakes should not need bleeding. The wheels should be straight but often they can require minor truing. All bolts should be checked. All bearings that are adjustable (not so many of these anymore) should be checked for proper tension. You should grease the threads of any bolts you work on. Finally...it's an important one..check the rear derailleur limit screws so your derailleur doesn't end up in your spokes!
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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    This stuff is more time than technical challenge.

  12. #12
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    Would you consider yourself mechanically inclined? If so, bikes are simple. I bought a Mercier road bike a long time ago and it was pretty easy to put it together. I learned how to do all of my own adjustments because I was tired of paying for a shop to keep my bikes for a week at time. Its basically just nuts, bolts, and cables.

    I bought a book called Mountain Bike Maintenance and it pretty much taught everything about bikes except suspension. I even built wheels by following the directions in that book and they always stayed true. I still shop at the LBS, but only when I need parts or tools. Never for service.

    BTW, suspension is easily learned by watching videos on youtube.
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  13. #13
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    An experienced bike builder will take it from box to sales floor in 15 minutes.

    An inexperienced, but reasonably mechanically inclined person will assemble it in 30-45 minutes and then take an additional 10-30 minutes to tune it.

    One word of caution. Make sure every nut/bolt is tight, especially those the factory has already put in place, and use a torque wrench for those bolts that have prescribed settings according to the manual as to not over tighten key areas.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  14. #14
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    Do it yourself. Its really not hard. If you have no experience with the different components do your research ahead of time. I assembled my wife's BD bike in about an hour. That included adjusting the derailleur, aligning the brakes, and double checking everything.

    Lots of good advice so far.

    As already stated, even if you are a total noob you will come out of it knowing more about your bike and how it functions. That can and will pay off down the road.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by John.K View Post
    So after stopping biking for roughly 10 years, I am ready to jump back into the sport for leisure. Been lurking the forums a lot for the pass few weeks and have decided to purchase a Motobecane Fantom 29er Elite and have couple of questions if I may please get some assistance.

    1) How difficult is the assembly for someone who hasn't build many things? I have absolutely no problem assembling furnitures and computers etc but never anything with moving parts.

    2) Would you recommend me paying a bike service center $150+ to assemble a bike?

    3) Does a brand new bike require tuning etc? If I do decide to assemble myself, would I still have to drop it off at a LBS for tuning?


    ** I would post the link to the bike but I'm not allow to post links.

    As has been said, a good shop will charge you the price of a tune-up to assemble the bike, because that's really what's required to ensure that the bike is properly set up. A second-rate shop will tell you they can assemble it in a half an hour and charge you whatever the hourly rate comes out to.

    As also has been said, if you are for some reason afraid to pay a shop what it's worth to properly assemble your bike, then you should think very hard about purchasing a bike from your local bike shop. This is a great time of year to do just that as most shops are closing out the previous year's models.

    The bike shop you choose to purchase your bike from should be the one that wants to charge you the cost of a full tune-up to assemble your bike, not the shop that wants to charge you a half hour or 45 minutes worth of the standard labor rate.

    I hope your experience turns out well!

    Best regards,

    --Jim
    "You'll thank me when it's all said and done"

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blister Butt View Post
    As has been said, a good shop will charge you the price of a tune-up to assemble the bike, because that's really what's required to ensure that the bike is properly set up. A second-rate shop will tell you they can assemble it in a half an hour and charge you whatever the hourly rate comes out to.

    As also has been said, if you are for some reason afraid to pay a shop what it's worth to properly assemble your bike, then you should think very hard about purchasing a bike from your local bike shop. This is a great time of year to do just that as most shops are closing out the previous year's models.

    The bike shop you choose to purchase your bike from should be the one that wants to charge you the cost of a full tune-up to assemble your bike, not the shop that wants to charge you a half hour or 45 minutes worth of the standard labor rate.

    I hope your experience turns out well!

    Best regards,

    --Jim
    A nearby shop charges $80 per hour. To me that seems like a "'fair" hourly rate.
    I like an hourly rate YMMV
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  17. #17
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    You might find this place helpful: » Open Shop Hours Sopo Bicycle Cooperative
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  18. #18
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    I have a 3 car garage that was converted to one car.
    I had recently moved, so the one car garage was packed with boxes and crap.
    I assembled mine there in around 1/2 hour I think. Plenty of cussing and knocking things over.

    And it never occurred to me that I could use my backyard the size of a basketball court!

    Now I look back at it, and I think to myself...
    WTH was I thinking? It really isn't very hard at all.

    Then you get to the adjusting. It really sucks because you have to check everything. You don't know if you went over everything. I have some form of OCD, as some (many) mtbrs have noticed and everything HAD to be adjusted perfectly. The brakes and front derailer were PITAs. My chain rings weren't true.
    For some reason, my derailer cables are contracting gradually. I kid you not. Now my front barrel adjuster is screwed in all the way, and the thing will barely shift down. It kills me.

    Or maybe I'm delusional.
    /rant

    Don't let the assembly get between you and an internet bike. If you're a real man, then putting it together will come to you naturally when you touch your tools. Like when Buddha achieved Nirvana by sitting under a tree. lol jk haha /joke. Yeesh! Not trying to be sexist or bring up religion or w/e.


    Sorry guys. Too much chocolate. And both us jolly fellows at mtbr and YouTube got your bike. I mean back.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  19. #19
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    Sau: shift to your small chainring and big cassette cog, detatch the f. Der. Cable from f der. Adjust barrel adjuster to middle of adjustment range. Adjust low screw limiter of f der until the inside of der is just barely not touching chain. Re-attach cable to f. Der.

    Shift to big chain ring and little cassette cog. If you cannot shift to big ring, adjust high limiter screw out until you can. Adjust High limiter screw until the outside of f der is just barely not touching chain.

    Shift to middle ring, little cog. F der should not touch chain. If it does, adjust with barrel until it just barely does not touch.

    Shift to big cog. F der should not touch chain. If it does, adjust with barrel until it just barely does not touch.

    Now, shift to little cog - it should not touch. Shift to big cog, it should not touch. Shift to little ring. It should not touch. Shift to third smallest cog. It should not touch

    Shift to big ring. It should not touch. Shift to third biggest cog. It should not touch.

    All done.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  20. #20
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    Small small and no chain rub?
    Sorry about the derailer rant. I know how to adjust my front derailer. But the cable seems to be contracting over time. I'll get to it later, but I'm just tired of screwing with it.

    Not to mention the barrel adjusters on my EF 51s are crap. I think the barrel adjusters are slipping somehow. The ferrule/housing is moving within the shifter. Just crap.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  21. #21
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    Not sure I wrote small/small. You shouldn't be in small/small or big/big. Cables can shrink with low temps. This procedure is routine and takes about ten minutes.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6bobby9 View Post
    An experienced bike builder will take it from box to sales floor in 15 minutes.

    An inexperienced, but reasonably mechanically inclined person will assemble it in 30-45 minutes and then take an additional 10-30 minutes to tune it.

    One word of caution. Make sure every nut/bolt is tight, especially those the factory has already put in place, and use a torque wrench for those bolts that have prescribed settings according to the manual as to not over tighten key areas.
    Really? Wow, I think you are way off. 15 minutes isn't enough time to properly put a bike together.
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  23. #23
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    If you brought a bike, un-assembled in a the box to the shop I work at we'd charge you more than the price of a tune-up; probably double. Now bring that same bike unpacked with the wheels on and you're looking at the price of tune up.

    It's rare that we have to cut brake lines down and bleed brakes on a new bike.

    The quickest anyone assembles a boxed bike where I work is a little over an hour, and that's if it comes out of the box with the bearings well adjusted, and the wheels true.

  24. #24
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    Wacth some videos... Parktool has a lot of diy on youtube and... Sram also hava a channel videos on yt

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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    Really? Wow, I think you are way off. 15 minutes isn't enough time to properly put a bike together.
    Bikesdirect bikes come more than 90% assembled. If you know what you are doing it won't very long.
    OP, learn to do it yourself. You can learn pretty much everything from youtube.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  26. #26
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    Do it. It's fun!
    Most experienced bike builders have a method or sequence that makes it faster and more orderly so they don't forget any steps, but it is not hard.
    Be thorough. Check that every part was installed correctly (i.e. nothing loose, nothing too tight). I find myself actually loosening some stuff and re-tightening it just to make sure it is torqued properly when I'm done.
    Use the right tools.
    Getting your wheels true and tensioned before you ride will pay off big time later on. I got a really tweaked set from an internet bike purchase once that took a long time to make right.
    New hydro brakes should be all ready to just bolt on and go.

    In the worst case, you slap it together and drop it off at your LBS for a tune-up. Just make sure all the parts are there.

    My pet peeve is that I HATE starting a build and then getting interrupted and having to come back to it later. Don't be in a hurry.

    Have fun!

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by CB2 View Post
    If you brought a bike, un-assembled in a the box to the shop I work at we'd charge you more than the price of a tune-up; probably double. Now bring that same bike unpacked with the wheels on and you're looking at the price of tune up.

    It's rare that we have to cut brake lines down and bleed brakes on a new bike.

    The quickest anyone assembles a boxed bike where I work is a little over an hour, and that's if it comes out of the box with the bearings well adjusted, and the wheels true.
    Amen brother...15 minutes...I ain't buying a bike at the shop
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6bobby9 View Post
    An experienced bike builder will take it from box to sales floor in 15 minutes.

    .



    At Walmart?

  29. #29
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    @6bobby9:

    15 minutes from box to floor? To unpack, basic assembly and torque check all fasteners, check wheel true and tension, adjust calipers/pads/cables, adjust drive train, air up tires, put a for sale sign on it?

    Real time video or I call total BS.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  30. #30
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    1 hour + or - depending on the wheels and if they need to be trued up. Now wallyworld is probably far less than that, being all about quality and all that.

  31. #31
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    A fifteen minute bike build is one where the mechanic simply opens the box, throws the seatpost in, clamps it in the stand, straightens the bars, throws in the front wheel, attaches the front brake and throws it through the gears to see if it generally shifts. Might adjust at the barrel adjuster.

    The bike is not ready to be sold. Period. It's a half-assed way of doing it, to simply get it out on the floor, so it's there and can be seen. Issue with this approach is that the bike still needs to be gone over a bit more thoroughly at the time of a test ride (and then hopefully sale) so you haven't saved anymore time in the long run. You've actually added it to the ass-end of the process when the customer (and you) want a smooth efficient process/sale. Having the bike go out on a test ride without spending this time (which doesn't have to be a full hour... it depends on the bike level really...but definitely not 15 minutes) is that it can leave a bad taste in the customers mouth because being "speedy" AKA half-assed, was the priority.

    There are a lot of small details to assembling a bike that are all important, and generally aren't going to be thought of or looked for by the first time builder. Derailleurs are often crooked, and or set too high, cables are often clamped in positions that aren't optimal...ie, the barrels are halfway out already and the derailleur is still not shifting properly. At that point, you've got to expose even more barrel to adjust cable, which is just fundamentally wrong. Set screws are off. Brake pads are contacting rim terribly, or calipers are uncentered etc. Both of which will cause accelerated wear, as well as poor performance. Wheels can be out of true, out of dish, you name it. rear hangers can be bent, out of alignment. Etc. etc. etc.

    When manufacturers box bikes, they box them with the mindset that close enough is good enough to get it in the box and to you. Some are better than others, but you always make sure. You don't just build on "robot mode".

    I've worked as a mechanic since '97 and this is true of all brands and quality levels. Building a bike in fifteen minutes and calling it done, is doing nothing to separate the 'bike shop' from the 'department store'. And that's what the customer is coming there for in the first place...reliabilty and quality.

    To the OP, yes you probably can assemble the bike yourself. It ain't rocket science. But, are you going to miss stuff that an experienced mechanic wouldn't? It is most likely. That's not an insult, it's just to be expected...you haven't done this before. My recommendation is to find a shop that you can talk with, and aren't utter snoots...ask them if they would be willing to build the bike for you and run you through the process at the same time. I never had a problem with giving advice to people...I actually appreciated their interest, and they appreciated my being happy to help them. You make good customers that way.

    And don't necessarily balk at the labor charge. It is the way the shop makes money. Don't get hosed, but don't be a stingey scrooge either. $75 to have your bike dialed isn't a bad price. Even 10% more than that ain't bad.

    For what it's worth...

    Good luck

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by jochribs View Post
    A fifteen minute bike build is one where the mechanic simply opens the box, throws the seatpost in, clamps it in the stand, straightens the bars, throws in the front wheel, attaches the front brake and throws it through the gears to see if it generally shifts. Might adjust at the barrel adjuster.

    The bike is not ready to be sold. Period. It's a half-assed way of doing it, to simply get it out on the floor, so it's there and can be seen. Issue with this approach is that the bike still needs to be gone over a bit more thoroughly at the time of a test ride (and then hopefully sale) so you haven't saved anymore time in the long run. You've actually added it to the ass-end of the process when the customer (and you) want a smooth efficient process/sale. Having the bike go out on a test ride without spending this time (which doesn't have to be a full hour... it depends on the bike level really...but definitely not 15 minutes) is that it can leave a bad taste in the customers mouth because being "speedy" AKA half-assed, was the priority.

    There are a lot of small details to assembling a bike that are all important, and generally aren't going to be thought of or looked for by the first time builder. Derailleurs are often crooked, and or set too high, cables are often clamped in positions that aren't optimal...ie, the barrels are halfway out already and the derailleur is still not shifting properly. At that point, you've got to expose even more barrel to adjust cable, which is just fundamentally wrong. Set screws are off. Brake pads are contacting rim terribly, or calipers are uncentered etc. Both of which will cause accelerated wear, as well as poor performance. Wheels can be out of true, out of dish, you name it. rear hangers can be bent, out of alignment. Etc. etc. etc.

    When manufacturers box bikes, they box them with the mindset that close enough is good enough to get it in the box and to you. Some are better than others, but you always make sure. You don't just build on "robot mode".

    I've worked as a mechanic since '97 and this is true of all brands and quality levels. Building a bike in fifteen minutes and calling it done, is doing nothing to separate the 'bike shop' from the 'department store'. And that's what the customer is coming there for in the first place...reliabilty and quality.

    To the OP, yes you probably can assemble the bike yourself. It ain't rocket science. But, are you going to miss stuff that an experienced mechanic wouldn't? It is most likely. That's not an insult, it's just to be expected...you haven't done this before. My recommendation is to find a shop that you can talk with, and aren't utter snoots...ask them if they would be willing to build the bike for you and run you through the process at the same time. I never had a problem with giving advice to people...I actually appreciated their interest, and they appreciated my being happy to help them. You make good customers that way.

    And don't necessarily balk at the labor charge. It is the way the shop makes money. Don't get hosed, but don't be a stingey scrooge either. $75 to have your bike dialed isn't a bad price. Even 10% more than that ain't bad.

    For what it's worth...

    Good luck
    You hit the nail on the head...nice post.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  33. #33
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    Thanks man. I just feel that in the long run, he'll benefit from this the most.

  34. #34
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    ^^^ Yep. Even with a $75 build, he is going to be ahead in terms of price. I built a lot of bikes in the 4 years I was a wrench and I just don't think folks that buy these online bikes realize what actually goes into putting one together properly. With that being said, there are plenty of shops that do the 15 minute build as well and you don't want to pay $75 for that. One of the selling points of the last shop I worked at vs. our competitors was that we did a top-notch assembly of the bikes.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    Really? Wow, I think you are way off. 15 minutes isn't enough time to properly put a bike together.
    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    ^^^ Yep. Even with a $75 build, he is going to be ahead in terms of price. I built a lot of bikes in the 4 years I was a wrench and I just don't think folks that buy these online bikes realize what actually goes into putting one together properly. With that being said, there are plenty of shops that do the 15 minute build as well and you don't want to pay $75 for that. One of the selling points of the last shop I worked at vs. our competitors was that we did a top-notch assembly of the bikes.
    I worked at my LBS for a few years while in school and have assembled a few hundred bikes. The bikes are 80% assembled out of the box. It would take me 10-15 minutes per bike followed by a short test ride on our little test track out back. It's so simple it gets boring. If you don't believe it IDFC, this shop is a regular winner for bike shop of the year in my city so we/they must be doing something right.
    Last edited by De La Pena; 12-13-2012 at 04:52 PM.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  36. #36
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    My friend, its easy. My Outcast was a simple build. There weren't any gears/ders to speak of, so assembly was a snap. I have since upgraded it to gears and have replaced almost everything else on it myself. Im the process, I have learned a great deal about bike building/adjustments----it just goes with the territory. If there is something that is beyond your technical skill, then try your LBS. If you want to try and do it all, then use some good references....many adjustment/repair tutorials can be found on youtube. Have fun
    I love 'Murica!

  37. #37
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    Bikes direct is a good online retailer but there is a lot to be said about supporting a business in your community.

    Sure, you can learn to do it all yourself through youtube (it is what I try and do and have been successful so far) but it is nice to start off with a professionally set up bike so you know what right feels like.

    A LBS will help you find the right size, set it up, tune it and have you ready to ride.
    Often they offer free tune ups (some even offer free life time tune ups).

  38. #38
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    Took me about half an hour to get my Fly Ti assembled (attach bars and wheels pretty much), double check all bolts, adjust air pressure, adjust calipers, put on pedals, ride around the block and adjust shifting. But then I usually do know what I am doing with a bike.

    It was very well tuned out of the box. Wheels had been true and stayed true. But that was their high end titanium model, so maybe whoever packs it in Taiwan pays a bit more attention.

    I would not recommend an online purchase to anybody who does not know how to perform basic adjustments. But it ain't rocket science, and do not let LBS employees browbeat you out of a sensible purchase.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6bobby9 View Post
    I worked at my LBS for a few years while in school and have assembled a few hundred bikes. The bikes are 80% assembled out of the box. It would take me 10-15 minutes per bike followed by a short test ride on our little test track out back. It's so simple it gets boring. If you don't believe it IDFC, this shop is a regular winner for bike shop of the year in my city so we/they must be doing something right.
    To the OP..... Do it! It is fun and rewarding to work on and build your own stuff.
    I work at an LBS and would never "browbeat" anyone out of working on their own stuff. That's how I started, and I'm sure every other tech out there started by working on their own things.

    To 6bobby9.......... I call ******** on this 15 minute thing. It takes me 15 minutes just to cut all the packing tape and protective wrap on the frames and install the reflectors.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocop View Post
    To the OP..... Do it! It is fun and rewarding to work on and build your own stuff.
    I work at an LBS and would never "browbeat" anyone out of working on their own stuff. That's how I started, and I'm sure every other tech out there started by working on their own things.

    To 6bobby9.......... I call ******** on this 15 minute thing. It takes me 15 minutes just to cut all the packing tape and protective wrap on the frames and install the reflectors.

    Then you're slow. Really slow. You just might be the guy I was hired to replace. We would have laughed and made fun of you. Whats not to understand? When you build these things day in and day out it's second nature.

    1. Open box. (5 seconds)
    2. attach seatpost and pull bike out of box and clamp on to stand. (30 seconds)
    3. tear off packing (20 seconds)
    4. attached bars and tighten levers and shifters. (60 seconds)
    5. mount front wheel and adjust front brake (60 seconds)
    6. adjust back wheel and brakes (60 seconds)
    7. Pump front and rear shock. (60 seconds)
    8. Air up tires with shop compressor (30 seconds)
    9. Attach pedals (30 seconds)
    10. Adjust front and rear derailleurs (90 seconds)
    11. Take a drink of favorite beverage (60 seconds)
    12. Check wheel tru (30 seconds)
    13. Secure and torque all bolts. (180 seconds)
    14. mount reflectors (60 seconds).
    15. Record serial number and affix price tag to owners manual (60 seconds)
    16. Remove bike from stand and make any final saddle adjustments. 60 Seconds
    17. Test Ride.

    If I am not mistaken, that's around 14 minutes there.


    WIN.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  41. #41
    AZ
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    Walmart build.

  42. #42
    Genius
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    Walmart build.
    Is that where you got your bike? uhhh. ok. lol.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  43. #43
    AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6bobby9 View Post
    Is that where you got your bike? uhhh. ok. lol.



    What a brilliant retort.

  44. #44
    Genius
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    What a brilliant retort.
    Yup. Took me less than 15 minutes to come up with that one too. I am genuis.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6bobby9 View Post
    Then you're slow. Really slow. You just might be the guy I was hired to replace. We would have laughed and made fun of you. Whats not to understand? When you build these things day in and day out it's second nature.

    1. Open box. (5 seconds)
    2. attach seatpost and pull bike out of box and clamp on to stand. (30 seconds)
    3. tear off packing (20 seconds)
    4. attached bars and tighten levers and shifters. (60 seconds)
    5. mount front wheel and adjust front brake (60 seconds)
    6. adjust back wheel and brakes (60 seconds)
    7. Pump front and rear shock. (60 seconds)
    8. Air up tires with shop compressor (30 seconds)
    9. Attach pedals (30 seconds)
    10. Adjust front and rear derailleurs (90 seconds)
    11. Take a drink of favorite beverage (60 seconds)
    12. Check wheel tru (30 seconds)
    13. Secure and torque all bolts. (180 seconds)
    14. mount reflectors (60 seconds).
    15. Record serial number and affix price tag to owners manual (60 seconds)
    16. Remove bike from stand and make any final saddle adjustments. 60 Seconds
    17. Test Ride.

    If I am not mistaken, that's around 14 minutes there.


    WIN.



    Do you know what the difference is between a trained monkey and a bike tech? Yep, about 45 mins.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by roadie scum View Post
    Do you know what the difference is between a trained monkey and a bike tech? Yep, about 45 mins.
    If you put down the pipe you might have a future.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  47. #47
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    Dude, there is no shame in your employment at walmart. Keep trying, they might even bump you up to assembling grills. Fly the flag proudly.

  48. #48
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    I say we neg rep bob69by back to something rivaling DC. Make him our boy.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  49. #49
    I like turtles
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    Do you use air tools when you build your bikes?
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  50. #50
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    I'm getting my Fantom29 X7 tomorrow, but probably won't "build" it until I'm off work Monday. Tomorrow morning I plan to piece together a DIY PVC stand and clean out some space around the workbench. I picked up a pedal wrench, tire pump and a few other tools today from my LBS and should be good to go. Just need to keep reading (hydraulic brake adjustments, wheel truing, etc) and I'll be good to go. It's cold out and I'm a pretty patient person when I'm doing something I don't want to screw up, so I will probably drag out the assembly process to 18-21 minutes... tops.

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