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  1. #1
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    How hard is bikesdirect's bike assembly?

    So after stopping biking for roughly 10 years, I am ready to jump back into the sport for leisure. Been lurking the forums a lot for the pass few weeks and have decided to purchase a Motobecane Fantom 29er Elite and have couple of questions if I may please get some assistance.

    1) How difficult is the assembly for someone who hasn't build many things? I have absolutely no problem assembling furnitures and computers etc but never anything with moving parts.

    2) Would you recommend me paying a bike service center $150+ to assemble a bike?

    3) Does a brand new bike require tuning etc? If I do decide to assemble myself, would I still have to drop it off at a LBS for tuning?


    ** I would post the link to the bike but I'm not allow to post links.

  2. #2
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    Pay a pizza to a friend unless do you to bleed the brakes you can assembly in home

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  3. #3
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    Wish the had a friend that's into mountain biking =(

    Is it required to bleed the brakes on a brand new bike?

  4. #4
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    Its not hard. BUT, assembling a bike correctly is more than just slapping on the front wheel and straightening the stem - to do it right there are lots of small things that should be done. Honestly, based on your description, pay ~$75 and have a shop do it. $150 sounds way high. We typically charged the price of a tune-up at the shop I worked at to assemble a bike.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  5. #5
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    This site might help.
    Shop Talk

    If you have to start paying for assembly help and/or tuning it might end up being cheaper to buy a bike from a local shop. They come assembled and tuned and often with a period of free servicing.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  6. #6
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    Omg... In Brazik this service cost less 20bucks.... I go to USA to assembly bikes

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    Its not hard. BUT, assembling a bike correctly is more than just slapping on the front wheel and straightening the stem - to do it right there are lots of small things that should be done. Honestly, based on your description, pay ~$75 and have a shop do it. $150 sounds way high. We typically charged the price of a tune-up at the shop I worked at to assemble a bike.
    Oh wow, I've call around a few shops and all have quoted me $100+. R.e.i wanted close to $200

    On a side note- Does anyone around the Atlanta area know of a reputable bike shop that will do it for a reasonable price?

    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    This site might help.


    If you have to start paying for assembly help and/or tuning it might end up being cheaper to buy a bike from a local shop. They come assembled and tuned and often with a period of free servicing.
    Excellent! Thanks so much for the link. Too bad I can't reverse the purchase now, it has already been shipped.

  8. #8
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    This stuff is more time than technical challenge.
    The time it takes to finish the assembly and do the initial tune is going to be well spent. LBS techs don't offer trail side assistance. What you learn is what you'll need on the trail.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    This stuff is more time than technical challenge.
    The time it takes to finish the assembly and do the initial tune is going to be well spent. LBS techs don't offer trail side assistance. What you learn is what you'll need on the trail.
    This

    Buy a "cheap" tool kit or a few select tools.
    Plenty of info around on how to work on bikes. Parktool site is good. Lots of you tube videos, ask here. Learn to do it yourself. take your time you will be OK. Enjoy your new bike.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  10. #10
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    I think some shops dislike people who buy online so they jack up their assembly costs..terrible. Yes, doing it yourself is great and will teach you a lot. Just keep in mind the bike has not been adjusted beyond the quick work done at the factory. The derailleurs and brakes will likely need tweaking. The disc brakes should not need bleeding. The wheels should be straight but often they can require minor truing. All bolts should be checked. All bearings that are adjustable (not so many of these anymore) should be checked for proper tension. You should grease the threads of any bolts you work on. Finally...it's an important one..check the rear derailleur limit screws so your derailleur doesn't end up in your spokes!
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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    This stuff is more time than technical challenge.

  12. #12
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    Would you consider yourself mechanically inclined? If so, bikes are simple. I bought a Mercier road bike a long time ago and it was pretty easy to put it together. I learned how to do all of my own adjustments because I was tired of paying for a shop to keep my bikes for a week at time. Its basically just nuts, bolts, and cables.

    I bought a book called Mountain Bike Maintenance and it pretty much taught everything about bikes except suspension. I even built wheels by following the directions in that book and they always stayed true. I still shop at the LBS, but only when I need parts or tools. Never for service.

    BTW, suspension is easily learned by watching videos on youtube.
    What do we want? TIME TRAVEL! When do want it? THAT'S IRRELEVANT!

  13. #13
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    An experienced bike builder will take it from box to sales floor in 15 minutes.

    An inexperienced, but reasonably mechanically inclined person will assemble it in 30-45 minutes and then take an additional 10-30 minutes to tune it.

    One word of caution. Make sure every nut/bolt is tight, especially those the factory has already put in place, and use a torque wrench for those bolts that have prescribed settings according to the manual as to not over tighten key areas.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  14. #14
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    Do it yourself. Its really not hard. If you have no experience with the different components do your research ahead of time. I assembled my wife's BD bike in about an hour. That included adjusting the derailleur, aligning the brakes, and double checking everything.

    Lots of good advice so far.

    As already stated, even if you are a total noob you will come out of it knowing more about your bike and how it functions. That can and will pay off down the road.
    Sent via my heady vibes from the heart of Pisgahstan

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by John.K View Post
    So after stopping biking for roughly 10 years, I am ready to jump back into the sport for leisure. Been lurking the forums a lot for the pass few weeks and have decided to purchase a Motobecane Fantom 29er Elite and have couple of questions if I may please get some assistance.

    1) How difficult is the assembly for someone who hasn't build many things? I have absolutely no problem assembling furnitures and computers etc but never anything with moving parts.

    2) Would you recommend me paying a bike service center $150+ to assemble a bike?

    3) Does a brand new bike require tuning etc? If I do decide to assemble myself, would I still have to drop it off at a LBS for tuning?


    ** I would post the link to the bike but I'm not allow to post links.

    As has been said, a good shop will charge you the price of a tune-up to assemble the bike, because that's really what's required to ensure that the bike is properly set up. A second-rate shop will tell you they can assemble it in a half an hour and charge you whatever the hourly rate comes out to.

    As also has been said, if you are for some reason afraid to pay a shop what it's worth to properly assemble your bike, then you should think very hard about purchasing a bike from your local bike shop. This is a great time of year to do just that as most shops are closing out the previous year's models.

    The bike shop you choose to purchase your bike from should be the one that wants to charge you the cost of a full tune-up to assemble your bike, not the shop that wants to charge you a half hour or 45 minutes worth of the standard labor rate.

    I hope your experience turns out well!

    Best regards,

    --Jim
    "You'll thank me when it's all said and done"

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blister Butt View Post
    As has been said, a good shop will charge you the price of a tune-up to assemble the bike, because that's really what's required to ensure that the bike is properly set up. A second-rate shop will tell you they can assemble it in a half an hour and charge you whatever the hourly rate comes out to.

    As also has been said, if you are for some reason afraid to pay a shop what it's worth to properly assemble your bike, then you should think very hard about purchasing a bike from your local bike shop. This is a great time of year to do just that as most shops are closing out the previous year's models.

    The bike shop you choose to purchase your bike from should be the one that wants to charge you the cost of a full tune-up to assemble your bike, not the shop that wants to charge you a half hour or 45 minutes worth of the standard labor rate.

    I hope your experience turns out well!

    Best regards,

    --Jim
    A nearby shop charges $80 per hour. To me that seems like a "'fair" hourly rate.
    I like an hourly rate YMMV
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  17. #17
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    You might find this place helpful: Open Shop Hours Sopo Bicycle Cooperative
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  18. #18
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    I have a 3 car garage that was converted to one car.
    I had recently moved, so the one car garage was packed with boxes and crap.
    I assembled mine there in around 1/2 hour I think. Plenty of cussing and knocking things over.

    And it never occurred to me that I could use my backyard the size of a basketball court!

    Now I look back at it, and I think to myself...
    WTH was I thinking? It really isn't very hard at all.

    Then you get to the adjusting. It really sucks because you have to check everything. You don't know if you went over everything. I have some form of OCD, as some (many) mtbrs have noticed and everything HAD to be adjusted perfectly. The brakes and front derailer were PITAs. My chain rings weren't true.
    For some reason, my derailer cables are contracting gradually. I kid you not. Now my front barrel adjuster is screwed in all the way, and the thing will barely shift down. It kills me.

    Or maybe I'm delusional.
    /rant

    Don't let the assembly get between you and an internet bike. If you're a real man, then putting it together will come to you naturally when you touch your tools. Like when Buddha achieved Nirvana by sitting under a tree. lol jk haha /joke. Yeesh! Not trying to be sexist or bring up religion or w/e.


    Sorry guys. Too much chocolate. And both us jolly fellows at mtbr and YouTube got your bike. I mean back.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  19. #19
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    Sau: shift to your small chainring and big cassette cog, detatch the f. Der. Cable from f der. Adjust barrel adjuster to middle of adjustment range. Adjust low screw limiter of f der until the inside of der is just barely not touching chain. Re-attach cable to f. Der.

    Shift to big chain ring and little cassette cog. If you cannot shift to big ring, adjust high limiter screw out until you can. Adjust High limiter screw until the outside of f der is just barely not touching chain.

    Shift to middle ring, little cog. F der should not touch chain. If it does, adjust with barrel until it just barely does not touch.

    Shift to big cog. F der should not touch chain. If it does, adjust with barrel until it just barely does not touch.

    Now, shift to little cog - it should not touch. Shift to big cog, it should not touch. Shift to little ring. It should not touch. Shift to third smallest cog. It should not touch

    Shift to big ring. It should not touch. Shift to third biggest cog. It should not touch.

    All done.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  20. #20
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    Small small and no chain rub?
    Sorry about the derailer rant. I know how to adjust my front derailer. But the cable seems to be contracting over time. I'll get to it later, but I'm just tired of screwing with it.

    Not to mention the barrel adjusters on my EF 51s are crap. I think the barrel adjusters are slipping somehow. The ferrule/housing is moving within the shifter. Just crap.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  21. #21
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    Not sure I wrote small/small. You shouldn't be in small/small or big/big. Cables can shrink with low temps. This procedure is routine and takes about ten minutes.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6bobby9 View Post
    An experienced bike builder will take it from box to sales floor in 15 minutes.

    An inexperienced, but reasonably mechanically inclined person will assemble it in 30-45 minutes and then take an additional 10-30 minutes to tune it.

    One word of caution. Make sure every nut/bolt is tight, especially those the factory has already put in place, and use a torque wrench for those bolts that have prescribed settings according to the manual as to not over tighten key areas.
    Really? Wow, I think you are way off. 15 minutes isn't enough time to properly put a bike together.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  23. #23
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    If you brought a bike, un-assembled in a the box to the shop I work at we'd charge you more than the price of a tune-up; probably double. Now bring that same bike unpacked with the wheels on and you're looking at the price of tune up.

    It's rare that we have to cut brake lines down and bleed brakes on a new bike.

    The quickest anyone assembles a boxed bike where I work is a little over an hour, and that's if it comes out of the box with the bearings well adjusted, and the wheels true.

  24. #24
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    Wacth some videos... Parktool has a lot of diy on youtube and... Sram also hava a channel videos on yt

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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    Really? Wow, I think you are way off. 15 minutes isn't enough time to properly put a bike together.
    Bikesdirect bikes come more than 90% assembled. If you know what you are doing it won't very long.
    OP, learn to do it yourself. You can learn pretty much everything from youtube.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

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