Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 58
  1. #26
    Professional Crastinator
    Reputation: Fleas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,709
    Do it. It's fun!
    Most experienced bike builders have a method or sequence that makes it faster and more orderly so they don't forget any steps, but it is not hard.
    Be thorough. Check that every part was installed correctly (i.e. nothing loose, nothing too tight). I find myself actually loosening some stuff and re-tightening it just to make sure it is torqued properly when I'm done.
    Use the right tools.
    Getting your wheels true and tensioned before you ride will pay off big time later on. I got a really tweaked set from an internet bike purchase once that took a long time to make right.
    New hydro brakes should be all ready to just bolt on and go.

    In the worst case, you slap it together and drop it off at your LBS for a tune-up. Just make sure all the parts are there.

    My pet peeve is that I HATE starting a build and then getting interrupted and having to come back to it later. Don't be in a hurry.

    Have fun!

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  2. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TiGeo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4,000
    Quote Originally Posted by CB2 View Post
    If you brought a bike, un-assembled in a the box to the shop I work at we'd charge you more than the price of a tune-up; probably double. Now bring that same bike unpacked with the wheels on and you're looking at the price of tune up.

    It's rare that we have to cut brake lines down and bleed brakes on a new bike.

    The quickest anyone assembles a boxed bike where I work is a little over an hour, and that's if it comes out of the box with the bearings well adjusted, and the wheels true.
    Amen brother...15 minutes...I ain't buying a bike at the shop
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  3. #28
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,996
    Quote Originally Posted by 6bobby9 View Post
    An experienced bike builder will take it from box to sales floor in 15 minutes.

    .



    At Walmart?

  4. #29
    FKA Malibu412
    Reputation: Glide the Clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    4,415
    @6bobby9:

    15 minutes from box to floor? To unpack, basic assembly and torque check all fasteners, check wheel true and tension, adjust calipers/pads/cables, adjust drive train, air up tires, put a for sale sign on it?

    Real time video or I call total BS.
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  5. #30
    banned
    Reputation: roadie scum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    836
    1 hour + or - depending on the wheels and if they need to be trued up. Now wallyworld is probably far less than that, being all about quality and all that.

  6. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    633
    A fifteen minute bike build is one where the mechanic simply opens the box, throws the seatpost in, clamps it in the stand, straightens the bars, throws in the front wheel, attaches the front brake and throws it through the gears to see if it generally shifts. Might adjust at the barrel adjuster.

    The bike is not ready to be sold. Period. It's a half-assed way of doing it, to simply get it out on the floor, so it's there and can be seen. Issue with this approach is that the bike still needs to be gone over a bit more thoroughly at the time of a test ride (and then hopefully sale) so you haven't saved anymore time in the long run. You've actually added it to the ass-end of the process when the customer (and you) want a smooth efficient process/sale. Having the bike go out on a test ride without spending this time (which doesn't have to be a full hour... it depends on the bike level really...but definitely not 15 minutes) is that it can leave a bad taste in the customers mouth because being "speedy" AKA half-assed, was the priority.

    There are a lot of small details to assembling a bike that are all important, and generally aren't going to be thought of or looked for by the first time builder. Derailleurs are often crooked, and or set too high, cables are often clamped in positions that aren't optimal...ie, the barrels are halfway out already and the derailleur is still not shifting properly. At that point, you've got to expose even more barrel to adjust cable, which is just fundamentally wrong. Set screws are off. Brake pads are contacting rim terribly, or calipers are uncentered etc. Both of which will cause accelerated wear, as well as poor performance. Wheels can be out of true, out of dish, you name it. rear hangers can be bent, out of alignment. Etc. etc. etc.

    When manufacturers box bikes, they box them with the mindset that close enough is good enough to get it in the box and to you. Some are better than others, but you always make sure. You don't just build on "robot mode".

    I've worked as a mechanic since '97 and this is true of all brands and quality levels. Building a bike in fifteen minutes and calling it done, is doing nothing to separate the 'bike shop' from the 'department store'. And that's what the customer is coming there for in the first place...reliabilty and quality.

    To the OP, yes you probably can assemble the bike yourself. It ain't rocket science. But, are you going to miss stuff that an experienced mechanic wouldn't? It is most likely. That's not an insult, it's just to be expected...you haven't done this before. My recommendation is to find a shop that you can talk with, and aren't utter snoots...ask them if they would be willing to build the bike for you and run you through the process at the same time. I never had a problem with giving advice to people...I actually appreciated their interest, and they appreciated my being happy to help them. You make good customers that way.

    And don't necessarily balk at the labor charge. It is the way the shop makes money. Don't get hosed, but don't be a stingey scrooge either. $75 to have your bike dialed isn't a bad price. Even 10% more than that ain't bad.

    For what it's worth...

    Good luck

  7. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TiGeo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4,000
    Quote Originally Posted by jochribs View Post
    A fifteen minute bike build is one where the mechanic simply opens the box, throws the seatpost in, clamps it in the stand, straightens the bars, throws in the front wheel, attaches the front brake and throws it through the gears to see if it generally shifts. Might adjust at the barrel adjuster.

    The bike is not ready to be sold. Period. It's a half-assed way of doing it, to simply get it out on the floor, so it's there and can be seen. Issue with this approach is that the bike still needs to be gone over a bit more thoroughly at the time of a test ride (and then hopefully sale) so you haven't saved anymore time in the long run. You've actually added it to the ass-end of the process when the customer (and you) want a smooth efficient process/sale. Having the bike go out on a test ride without spending this time (which doesn't have to be a full hour... it depends on the bike level really...but definitely not 15 minutes) is that it can leave a bad taste in the customers mouth because being "speedy" AKA half-assed, was the priority.

    There are a lot of small details to assembling a bike that are all important, and generally aren't going to be thought of or looked for by the first time builder. Derailleurs are often crooked, and or set too high, cables are often clamped in positions that aren't optimal...ie, the barrels are halfway out already and the derailleur is still not shifting properly. At that point, you've got to expose even more barrel to adjust cable, which is just fundamentally wrong. Set screws are off. Brake pads are contacting rim terribly, or calipers are uncentered etc. Both of which will cause accelerated wear, as well as poor performance. Wheels can be out of true, out of dish, you name it. rear hangers can be bent, out of alignment. Etc. etc. etc.

    When manufacturers box bikes, they box them with the mindset that close enough is good enough to get it in the box and to you. Some are better than others, but you always make sure. You don't just build on "robot mode".

    I've worked as a mechanic since '97 and this is true of all brands and quality levels. Building a bike in fifteen minutes and calling it done, is doing nothing to separate the 'bike shop' from the 'department store'. And that's what the customer is coming there for in the first place...reliabilty and quality.

    To the OP, yes you probably can assemble the bike yourself. It ain't rocket science. But, are you going to miss stuff that an experienced mechanic wouldn't? It is most likely. That's not an insult, it's just to be expected...you haven't done this before. My recommendation is to find a shop that you can talk with, and aren't utter snoots...ask them if they would be willing to build the bike for you and run you through the process at the same time. I never had a problem with giving advice to people...I actually appreciated their interest, and they appreciated my being happy to help them. You make good customers that way.

    And don't necessarily balk at the labor charge. It is the way the shop makes money. Don't get hosed, but don't be a stingey scrooge either. $75 to have your bike dialed isn't a bad price. Even 10% more than that ain't bad.

    For what it's worth...

    Good luck
    You hit the nail on the head...nice post.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  8. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    633
    Thanks man. I just feel that in the long run, he'll benefit from this the most.

  9. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TiGeo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4,000
    ^^^ Yep. Even with a $75 build, he is going to be ahead in terms of price. I built a lot of bikes in the 4 years I was a wrench and I just don't think folks that buy these online bikes realize what actually goes into putting one together properly. With that being said, there are plenty of shops that do the 15 minute build as well and you don't want to pay $75 for that. One of the selling points of the last shop I worked at vs. our competitors was that we did a top-notch assembly of the bikes.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  10. #35
    Genius
    Reputation: De La Pena's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    903
    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    Really? Wow, I think you are way off. 15 minutes isn't enough time to properly put a bike together.
    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    ^^^ Yep. Even with a $75 build, he is going to be ahead in terms of price. I built a lot of bikes in the 4 years I was a wrench and I just don't think folks that buy these online bikes realize what actually goes into putting one together properly. With that being said, there are plenty of shops that do the 15 minute build as well and you don't want to pay $75 for that. One of the selling points of the last shop I worked at vs. our competitors was that we did a top-notch assembly of the bikes.
    I worked at my LBS for a few years while in school and have assembled a few hundred bikes. The bikes are 80% assembled out of the box. It would take me 10-15 minutes per bike followed by a short test ride on our little test track out back. It's so simple it gets boring. If you don't believe it IDFC, this shop is a regular winner for bike shop of the year in my city so we/they must be doing something right.
    Last edited by De La Pena; 12-13-2012 at 04:52 PM.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  11. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: coot271's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    222
    My friend, its easy. My Outcast was a simple build. There weren't any gears/ders to speak of, so assembly was a snap. I have since upgraded it to gears and have replaced almost everything else on it myself. Im the process, I have learned a great deal about bike building/adjustments----it just goes with the territory. If there is something that is beyond your technical skill, then try your LBS. If you want to try and do it all, then use some good references....many adjustment/repair tutorials can be found on youtube. Have fun
    "I have come to kick ass and chew bubblegum....and I'm all outta bubblegum".

  12. #37
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,868
    Bikes direct is a good online retailer but there is a lot to be said about supporting a business in your community.

    Sure, you can learn to do it all yourself through youtube (it is what I try and do and have been successful so far) but it is nice to start off with a professionally set up bike so you know what right feels like.

    A LBS will help you find the right size, set it up, tune it and have you ready to ride.
    Often they offer free tune ups (some even offer free life time tune ups).

  13. #38
    Axe
    Axe is online now
    Custom User Title
    Reputation: Axe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,764
    Took me about half an hour to get my Fly Ti assembled (attach bars and wheels pretty much), double check all bolts, adjust air pressure, adjust calipers, put on pedals, ride around the block and adjust shifting. But then I usually do know what I am doing with a bike.

    It was very well tuned out of the box. Wheels had been true and stayed true. But that was their high end titanium model, so maybe whoever packs it in Taiwan pays a bit more attention.

    I would not recommend an online purchase to anybody who does not know how to perform basic adjustments. But it ain't rocket science, and do not let LBS employees browbeat you out of a sensible purchase.

  14. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ghettocop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,353
    Quote Originally Posted by 6bobby9 View Post
    I worked at my LBS for a few years while in school and have assembled a few hundred bikes. The bikes are 80% assembled out of the box. It would take me 10-15 minutes per bike followed by a short test ride on our little test track out back. It's so simple it gets boring. If you don't believe it IDFC, this shop is a regular winner for bike shop of the year in my city so we/they must be doing something right.
    To the OP..... Do it! It is fun and rewarding to work on and build your own stuff.
    I work at an LBS and would never "browbeat" anyone out of working on their own stuff. That's how I started, and I'm sure every other tech out there started by working on their own things.

    To 6bobby9.......... I call ******** on this 15 minute thing. It takes me 15 minutes just to cut all the packing tape and protective wrap on the frames and install the reflectors.

  15. #40
    Genius
    Reputation: De La Pena's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    903
    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocop View Post
    To the OP..... Do it! It is fun and rewarding to work on and build your own stuff.
    I work at an LBS and would never "browbeat" anyone out of working on their own stuff. That's how I started, and I'm sure every other tech out there started by working on their own things.

    To 6bobby9.......... I call ******** on this 15 minute thing. It takes me 15 minutes just to cut all the packing tape and protective wrap on the frames and install the reflectors.

    Then you're slow. Really slow. You just might be the guy I was hired to replace. We would have laughed and made fun of you. Whats not to understand? When you build these things day in and day out it's second nature.

    1. Open box. (5 seconds)
    2. attach seatpost and pull bike out of box and clamp on to stand. (30 seconds)
    3. tear off packing (20 seconds)
    4. attached bars and tighten levers and shifters. (60 seconds)
    5. mount front wheel and adjust front brake (60 seconds)
    6. adjust back wheel and brakes (60 seconds)
    7. Pump front and rear shock. (60 seconds)
    8. Air up tires with shop compressor (30 seconds)
    9. Attach pedals (30 seconds)
    10. Adjust front and rear derailleurs (90 seconds)
    11. Take a drink of favorite beverage (60 seconds)
    12. Check wheel tru (30 seconds)
    13. Secure and torque all bolts. (180 seconds)
    14. mount reflectors (60 seconds).
    15. Record serial number and affix price tag to owners manual (60 seconds)
    16. Remove bike from stand and make any final saddle adjustments. 60 Seconds
    17. Test Ride.

    If I am not mistaken, that's around 14 minutes there.


    WIN.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  16. #41
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,996
    Walmart build.

  17. #42
    Genius
    Reputation: De La Pena's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    903
    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    Walmart build.
    Is that where you got your bike? uhhh. ok. lol.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  18. #43
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,996
    Quote Originally Posted by 6bobby9 View Post
    Is that where you got your bike? uhhh. ok. lol.



    What a brilliant retort.

  19. #44
    Genius
    Reputation: De La Pena's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    903
    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS View Post
    What a brilliant retort.
    Yup. Took me less than 15 minutes to come up with that one too. I am genuis.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  20. #45
    banned
    Reputation: roadie scum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    836
    Quote Originally Posted by 6bobby9 View Post
    Then you're slow. Really slow. You just might be the guy I was hired to replace. We would have laughed and made fun of you. Whats not to understand? When you build these things day in and day out it's second nature.

    1. Open box. (5 seconds)
    2. attach seatpost and pull bike out of box and clamp on to stand. (30 seconds)
    3. tear off packing (20 seconds)
    4. attached bars and tighten levers and shifters. (60 seconds)
    5. mount front wheel and adjust front brake (60 seconds)
    6. adjust back wheel and brakes (60 seconds)
    7. Pump front and rear shock. (60 seconds)
    8. Air up tires with shop compressor (30 seconds)
    9. Attach pedals (30 seconds)
    10. Adjust front and rear derailleurs (90 seconds)
    11. Take a drink of favorite beverage (60 seconds)
    12. Check wheel tru (30 seconds)
    13. Secure and torque all bolts. (180 seconds)
    14. mount reflectors (60 seconds).
    15. Record serial number and affix price tag to owners manual (60 seconds)
    16. Remove bike from stand and make any final saddle adjustments. 60 Seconds
    17. Test Ride.

    If I am not mistaken, that's around 14 minutes there.


    WIN.



    Do you know what the difference is between a trained monkey and a bike tech? Yep, about 45 mins.

  21. #46
    Genius
    Reputation: De La Pena's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    903
    Quote Originally Posted by roadie scum View Post
    Do you know what the difference is between a trained monkey and a bike tech? Yep, about 45 mins.
    If you put down the pipe you might have a future.
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  22. #47
    banned
    Reputation: roadie scum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    836
    Dude, there is no shame in your employment at walmart. Keep trying, they might even bump you up to assembling grills. Fly the flag proudly.

  23. #48
    FKA Malibu412
    Reputation: Glide the Clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    4,415
    I say we neg rep bob69by back to something rivaling DC. Make him our boy.
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  24. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: TiGeo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4,000
    Do you use air tools when you build your bikes?
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  25. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    118
    I'm getting my Fantom29 X7 tomorrow, but probably won't "build" it until I'm off work Monday. Tomorrow morning I plan to piece together a DIY PVC stand and clean out some space around the workbench. I picked up a pedal wrench, tire pump and a few other tools today from my LBS and should be good to go. Just need to keep reading (hydraulic brake adjustments, wheel truing, etc) and I'll be good to go. It's cold out and I'm a pretty patient person when I'm doing something I don't want to screw up, so I will probably drag out the assembly process to 18-21 minutes... tops.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •