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  1. #401
    Sim
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    I know I'm on the cusp and can't decide. I'm currently riding an XL Process 134 with the old geometry. 40mm stem, 619 stack, 485 reach and 660 TT.
    The large TP with a 50 to 60 mm stem gets me in the same ballpark seated with a higher front end, which would be good.
    I miss my bar ends when climbing but I must admit it gives you an old school look!
    Thanks for the info, at this point I'm leaning Large.

  2. #402
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    Go large. I'm a hair under 6'3" and previously a XL Kona Process 153. The GG fits perfect.

  3. #403
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluidworks View Post
    Go large. I'm a hair under 6'3" and previously a XL Kona Process 153. The GG fits perfect.
    Thanks! It helps to hear from someone who is in the same situation.

  4. #404
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    FWIW- I am 6-3 with 34 inseam. Probably should have went Large per typical sizing recommendation. But I have long arms and upper body so went XL for the Reach and Stack offered in that size.
    I could not be happier. Absolutely perfect fitment. Running a 65 stem and 800mm bars. Most comfortable bike out of the 15 I've owned. Only bike that was close to this was my Manitou FS (rear forks) BITD, which was long, before long was the thing.
    PS-I should mention I have a 6-7 wingspan. Monkeys got nuthng on me!
    Last edited by chasejj; 1 Week Ago at 06:13 PM.

  5. #405
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sim View Post
    I know I'm on the cusp and can't decide. I'm currently riding an XL Process 134 with the old geometry. 40mm stem, 619 stack, 485 reach and 660 TT.
    The large TP with a 50 to 60 mm stem gets me in the same ballpark seated with a higher front end, which would be good.
    I miss my bar ends when climbing but I must admit it gives you an old school look!
    Thanks for the info, at this point I'm leaning Large.
    Feel free to email or call us as well, if you haven't already. We can help guide you based on further sizing details (ie wingspan), riding preferences, and terrain.

  6. #406
    Hey, a Bright Shiny Thing
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    6'5" with 36" inseam. I initially ordered XL and changed to a Large, and am glad i did. Bottom line is everyone is a bit different, I'd call the GG shop and get their input, they will be able to help you decide. My only regret is I didn't get a purple frame.

  7. #407
    Sim
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtg7aa View Post
    Feel free to email or call us as well, if you haven't already. We can help guide you based on further sizing details (ie wingspan), riding preferences, and terrain.
    I have a 6"4" wingspan, 36" inseam. Was leaning towards the large because of the wheelbase now I'm thinking XL. I pedal most of the time 1 or 2 shuttles a year. Any help is appreciated.

  8. #408
    Sim
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    "6'5" with 36" inseam. I initially ordered XL and changed to a Large, and am glad i did. Bottom line is everyone is a bit different, I'd call the GG shop and get their input, they will be able to help you decide. My only regret is I didn't get a purple frame."

    Back to the large! Now I'm neurotic!!!!! Thanks for the input.

  9. #409
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    I forgot to say I have a 6'5" wingspan. Go L with 800 bars and you're good.

  10. #410
    Sim
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluidworks View Post
    I forgot to say I have a 6'5" wingspan. Go L with 800 bars and you're good.
    I have 6"4" wingspan, so I'm still leaning large. I've emailed GG my dimensions and they are giving me a recommendation. I appreciate the help from everyone!

  11. #411
    Sim
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    Ordered a Black Large. Thanks for all the help!

  12. #412
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    Just received the Super Deluxe air. I'm going to ride tomorrow and then do a write up about the Pistol with coil vs. air.

  13. #413
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluidworks View Post
    Just received the Super Deluxe air. I'm going to ride tomorrow and then do a write up about the Pistol with coil vs. air.


    Not sure where you were at with sag on the coil spring, but most folks have been stoked on 30% sag with the air shocks. Based on feedback, that's now our baseline sag. So, try that first on the air shock.

    Note: our sag recommendations are measured in seated climbing position

  14. #414
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    Okay, just have to post this. Last weekend I hit the black diamond line ("Off The Grid" trail) on Tiger Mtn, WA on Saturday plus Duthie Hill park on Sunday. Then today I shuttled Alsea Falls, OR for 4 runs down Whistlepunk > Highballer > Springboard. Before that, Round Mtn and Lookout Mtn in the Ochocco NF, OR in late August. Between these four trail systems, there are steep climbs, drops, high speed sections, booters, doubles, rock gardens, tight bowl berms and plenty of flow, including plenty of ops for air time. I've been hitting it pretty hard throughout the past month after owning my Trail Pistol for a total of six months now. I really feel like I know this bike.

    This bike comes alive at speed. There's a sticker on the top tube that says, "I like goin' fast." When I got the bike I just thought that was a slogan; didn't mean much to me. I assumed GG put that on there to paraphrase the attitude of the company's bike purchasers. But after working this bike hard for months, including a spring road trip to Moab plus many miles in Oregon & Washington's real mountains with multi-thousand foot descents, I understand. Those words on the top tube ain't about me, they're about the bike. This bike comes alive at speed. The BIKE likes to go fast. The faster I go, the better it handles, the better the suspension responds and the more it rewards me. No question, the bike encourages me. I bought this bike just wanting a machine that fit me better than my previous whip but the Trail Pistol has absolutely upped my game. I'm taking on much more challenging terrain and features -- things I simply would never would have even considered before, stuff I never believed I could do -- not only with more confidence but with more safety in the execution. WAY confidence inspiring. A year ago I did not know I was capable of riding the way I'm riding today, and I've been riding mountain bikes since 1985.

    When I first got my TP, it didn't feel lively. Didn't seem to pop off stuff. I tried but it just didn't seem to want to. Honestly, I don't know what that was about because now I pop off stuff like crazy and the bike just seems to want to fly. What happened? I honestly can't say but in the short time I've owned it, this machine and I, we've become one and yes, it is indeed lively. I guess I made a leap. I understand how it moves. I really do fly and the bike is so easy to fly because it's lively and so predictable. It encourages me to hit stuff I used to take a pass on. Now I do so and it rewards me. So I'm more willing to stretch by looking at going to the next level. And I go there. I am already there. I love it.

    Within the first quarter mile on Tiger Mtn's black line, my riding buddies pulled over and told me to take the front. I'd been pushing them without even meaning to. I'm talking about a black diamond trail, a level of riding I was formerly not familiar with. But I simply rode away from them and I'm not bragging, just saying what happened. Like I said, it ain't about me. The Trail Pistol is a tool designed to do a specific job and OMG, does it ever get the job done. I can't believe how well designed this bike is for the task at hand. Wanna fly? This bike encourages me to fly.

    Are there other great bikes out there? Oh hell yes. I see guys on Yetis and Evils and Riots and Treks and Santa Cruzes (lots of Santa Cruzes) so I assume those guys know what they're doing as well, I don't know but assume so. Meanwhile I've got what I've got and damn, I know it's really good. As the saying goes, "Them that know, know they know. Them that don't know, don't know they don't know." Well, I know. My GG Trail Pistol is the real deal. It's made me a much better rider and honestly I wasn't bad before, just sayin'. I'm grateful to GG for knowing how to design and build a really sharp knife. I didn't know it could get this good.
    =sParty
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    We don't quit riding because we get old.
    We get old because we quit riding.

  15. #415
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    After receiving a Super deluxe air off of a pinkbike user I got the weekend to try the air vs. coil, and even did some back-to-back riding to directly compare. I have mentioned previously in this thread I lived in SoCal where 100% of my riding was long singletrack climbs to loooooong downhill runs on loose, rocky, sketchy terrain. Because of those conditions the coil was king; it never fatigued, overheated, or lost small bump compliance, especially compared to the regular (non-piggyback) deluxe shock. But when I moved to eastern Tennessee for the first time I found myself having to ride more slowly, with tight forests and slippery rocks and roots everywhere. The ability to blast down rock gardens at warp speed wasnít happening as much, and I started to miss the lighter weight and the poppy progression the air shock had. So, I decided to try both and decide which will work better for me here. Keep in mind, I never disliked the coil, I just felt like it might be over gunned for the majority of my riding. Iím also not a weight weenie, so the increased weight isnít a big deal to me.

    Saturday morning I started my ride in the urban wilderness here in Knoxville. I didnít plan on it, but the weather was so nice I ended up doing the entire south loop (https://www.mtbproject.com/trail/592...tem-south-loop). Itís 12.5 miles of riding, with a mix of rocky, chunky black diamond, to professionally built directional flow and jump trail, and miles of tight, twisty forest single track. Iíve ridden different sections previously with the coil, but for the day I did the entire loop and used the air. I carried the coil in my pack so I could switch when I wanted to directly compare.

    Setup: itís been a while since Iíve pumped up a shock, but the SD air was a breeze for me to get dialed. I followed Mattís advice for settings: 30% sag was at a much lower PSI than my old monarch, and I dialed rebound similar to the coil to keep it feeling as close as possible. It is nice having a coil simply for the ability to dial in preload on the trail without having to carry a pump. I kept one with me for the day, even though I never ended up using it after initial setup.

    Single track: I started off the ride with an up and down segment with some baby head boulders, square hits and g outs into mud pits. I forgot how progressive the air is compared to the coil, and I could preload and launch off everything I wanted to. The lighter weight wasnít a huge difference to me as mentioned previously, but I preferred riding higher in the travel that the air provided. While the traction was less than the coil could provide, the livelier feel was worth the small hit. If I had to choose, the air would win this category.

    Climbing: This surprised me, as honestly, I didnít find much difference between the two shocks. Maybe itís psychological, or maybe Iíve simply been used to the coil for a while, but I didnít see feel like I lost much to the air . I tried the middle compression setting on the air for a while during the smoother climbs, but spinning up in full open was easy as pie, and I settled on that for the traction increase. Square hits felt about the same between the two, but the small bump traction was definitely a bit better on the coil. Cleaning tech features was again, pretty similar. So overall, a wash between the two shocks.

    Black diamond downhill: I rode two of the more serious trails (https://www.mtbproject.com/trail/74743) and (https://www.mtbproject.com/trail/75971) in the south loop twice each (with each shock) and here is where I absolutely saw some greater difference between the two. My overall experience was the air was more composed at slower speeds; I never felt the rear skipping out even under off camber loose braking, and slower brake bumps were no big deal. Once speeds got higher, the air definitely lost out to the coil. It really is amazing how much traction a steel spring has when youíre flying down a trail. The drops, the chunder, the boulders, it shook them all off. As Hunter S. Thompson said ďFaster, Faster, until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death.Ē I never found myself out of control on the coil, it only wanted more speed. I did find myself blowing through all the travel, but the rubber bumper did a great job of stopping the travel without making me never feel like I would be bounced off. Conversely, compared to the air it felt much more dead at slower speeds. Even though the small bump compliance is better, it felt more like plodding along at slower speed, composed and maybe a bit sluggish. Overall the gnralier the terrain, the better the coil works, but for slower speeds, it took some of the fun out of the downhill.

    Flow and jump lines: Towards the end of my ride I got to Baker Creek, which has the areaís directional downhill trails. This is where the air really shined for me, as I ride here most often and am most used to the trails. The progressive and playful nature of the air was awesome; sections I had to pump before were now micro launch pads, and I felt like a feather popping off everything. Casing a couple of the bigger doubles let me run through most of the travel, but I never blew the O ring off, thanks to the air volume reducers installed. The coilís more linear feel made it easier to preload smoothly for clearing bigger gaps, but the air just made me feel like a hooligan (and I liked it.) Iím giving the air the win for this category.

    Summary: I donít think thereís a clear and distinct winner here, as peopleís riding style, geography and preferences will always outweigh a few grams or a few seconds on strava. However, because I personally prefer a progressive feel and like to fly off everything on the trail, the air suits me better for 80% of my riding. For everything else the coil would be definitely preferred. As air shocks have improved with the times and the divide between the two technologies has closed, I donít think most people could go wrong with either option, and if finances permit, having both on hand would be the best of both worlds.

  16. #416
    AOK
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    How much room does the TP seat tube have for a dropper? Was thinking about replacing my 150mm dropper with a longer travel version and want to make sure it will fit.

  17. #417
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    AOK, it depends on how much dropper post you have showing above the clamp. If it is fairly slammed already, you won't get a longer one in. I tried a 170 reverb and couldn't get it all the way in. By guestimate, you'd need about 60mm+ showing. However, the Bike Yoke 160mm is shorter body/install wise than a 150mm Reverb and fits in a treat. FYI

  18. #418
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    XL sizing

    An XL has about an inch longer top tube (I believe). This means I would be running about a 40mm stem on an XL, which I think is about right. And the XL has a longer head tube which means fewer spacers under the stem.

    Yes, the wheelbase would be EVEN longer on an XL but the length of this bike doesn't bother me at all. I negotiate tight switchbacks all the time -- up or down -- without even thinking about it. I'd be fine on an even longer bike.

    If I had it to do over again, yeah, I'd buy the XL. But keep in mind what I said previously -- I'm delighted with the bike as it is. Really. Guess I'm not helping much, am I. Sorry. But all kidding aside, I don't think you'll go wrong either way.

    Good luck.
    =sParty



    Just thought I would chime in FWIW,

    I have an XL TP, 130/140 set up. I was drawn to GG TP cause its made in the good ole USA but also cause the head tube is sized appropriately (meaning L and XL dont have the same size). I am 6'5", 36-34 inseam and monkey arms (near 8' wing span). The bike fits me the best of any bike I have ever had. I credit the heat tube length and the straight seat tube. That said the reach could be longer for me. I have a 40 mm stem with seat pushed all the way back and I find myself wishing for a longer top tube to get behind the front of the bike more when ripping downhills. Sure I could go longer stem but thats a compromise in bike geometry/handling in my opinion. Would a longer top tube make an already long bike too long? Not sure. I have never found the current length to be an issue. My current Pike has 51 mm offset, should have gone with the 46 (or shorter) which would help shorten the long wheel base and make the steering a little less twitchy I think.

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