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  1. #1
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    Goatheads and flats

    I have had a nice run of getting goatheads this month!! And each tire gets like 10 of them each.
    I think it has to do with riding on little used side trails that have brush on the path. In SoCal, we get some rain, everything grows, then dies.

    Should I just avoid these little side trails, get tire liner, get slime tubes or just get used to changing tubes???

  2. #2
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    Tubeless...then pull them out when the ride is done. Tubeless isn't really that hard after you figure out how it is done.

  3. #3
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    Second on the tubeless

    It can be a bit of a PITA to set up, but use decent tires and it is relatively flat free on the trail,I frown every time I put a tube in, tubeless rules....Jefe

  4. #4
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    I thought about tubeless, but this is supposed to be my low maintenance, low investment SS bike!!

  5. #5
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    look up the how-to videos on youtube for "ghetto tubeless". It works very well and is dirt cheap

  6. #6
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    Even if you buy the Stans Strips you are out a lot less money in the long run. You can also look up how to make the tire sealant yourself, which will save you more money.

    How many tubes have you gone through? They are what...$5 a piece? You could probably do tubeless for $20 if you know some with a compressor.

  7. #7
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    Goathead's

    Tubless with Stan's is the way to go. I ride in Arizona some of the year and can easily pick up 6to8 thorn's every ride. Your shop can do the conversion if you don't want to. Slime tube's will work but are heavier.

  8. #8
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    Tubeless with sealant. I pick up dozens every ride. Not a problem. Slime tubes are pretty good, too. Not sure about liners. I seem to remember the heavy Mr. Tuffy's being good against blackberries back in the 90's.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by allroy71
    I thought about tubeless, but this is supposed to be my low maintenance, low investment SS bike!!
    That's what we are saying, by going to tubeless - it will me back to low maintenance. Investment wise, you can use two old tubes and buy a jug (pint or a quart) of Stan's sealant at your LBS or online. A quick and dirty DIY ghetto split-tube conversion - and you won't be changing flats for a while.

  10. #10
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    Pull-em out spin the tire around and they seal right back up. Stan's is the stuff!
    I got a tire full of goatheads on Amasaback in Moab,

  11. #11
    bt
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    that crap always dries up when I use it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bt
    that crap always dries up when I use it.
    which stuff, Stan's or Slime?

    I've been using homebrew sealant of a similar style to Stan's and whether even over our 110deg summer time I've gotten 4+ months out of my sealant

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by allroy71
    I thought about tubeless, but this is supposed to be my low maintenance, low investment SS bike!!
    Start with the Slime (or Slimed, you can do it yourself) tubes.

    And do not bother to remove the thorn (except it may help spread them).
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  14. #14
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    Check it!


  15. #15
    Sweat is just fat crying.
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    Quote Originally Posted by motobutane
    Check it!

    That guy isn't wearing eye protection.

    Or a helmet, for that matter.
    Mountain Biking Is Not A Crime stickers, free! (You pay postage. PM me for details.)

  16. #16
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    mr tuffy liners are super heavy. you don't really want to add even more weight to your wheel do you? slime tubes are also heavy and work soso. way better then the tubes specialized put out. both pretty much suck aganist goat heads. go tubeless and mix stans with slime that you buy from an automotive store (has bigger chuncks of rubber in it). it's pretty simple to do yourself and you will for sure save time and money in the long run. can also run lower tire pressures!
    "if you can't be good, be good at it."

  17. #17
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    Tubeless looks very interesting and seems to offer a lot of benefits. I guess I am afraid of change!!
    For now, I am going to avoid riding through little used side trails. I hadn't had a flat in years, by sticking to well established trails.

  18. #18
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    Going ghetto tubeless is not very expensive and really worth it. It takes a while to set up with shaking and resting the wheels on buckets, but it is worth it.
    r
    After I made the switch I took a ride on a trail that seemed fun and was close to home. As I drove back home I heard some rattling. I had 10-12 goatheads in each tire. tough pulling them out but did so, spun the wheels and kept riding. No problems. Nice not to have to change tubes with flats. When you go out and ride with tubeless you don't have to worry about getting stuck changing flats. Make sure you do all the steps and refresh some Stans or homebrew every 4 or 6 months.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by allroy71
    Tubeless looks very interesting and seems to offer a lot of benefits. I guess I am afraid of change!!
    I think we all felt that way back in the day before making the change.

    Read this thread to see the process that started many of us back in 2006+.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by yourideit
    mr tuffy liners are super heavy. you don't really want to add even more weight to your wheel do you? slime tubes are also heavy and work soso. way better then the tubes specialized put out. both pretty much suck aganist goat heads. go tubeless and mix stans with slime that you buy from an automotive store (has bigger chuncks of rubber in it). it's pretty simple to do yourself and you will for sure save time and money in the long run. can also run lower tire pressures!
    I run tubeless on my bikes but use Mr. Tuffy "Ultra lite" liners on my kidís bikes.

    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...2&category=199

    If you run light tubes and the liners the weight difference in minimal

  21. #21
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    Mr. Tuffy seemed to be utterly worthless to me and the extra rotational weight was noticeable. Thorn resist tubes worked well but were WAY too heavy. Slime tubes or injecting sealant into your tubes works ok half the time but many tube punctures won't seal that way. This is not even to account for pinch flats either. Tubeless is really the way to go, much easier than I expected and not terribly expensive. Certainly worth the up front cost to never buy another tube or use another patch.

    Plus the ability to run nice low pressures is really sweet once you get used to trusting your tires to do so. I'd be kind of careful with that at first depending on the rim/tire combo though.

    I think for kids bikes injecting slime or slime tubes is a decent option.

  22. #22
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    Those plastic tire liners did not work at all for me. The thorns went straight through them. Slime is really messy and heavy. Tubeless with sealant is really the best way to go.

  23. #23
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    If you don't go tubeless, you might try Foss tubes. Lightweight and supposedly very puncture resistant. I heard a report on them from the Taiwan bike show by someone who got to press a nail through one. The tube apparently forms a seal around the nail. I haven't tried them yet, but I am going to try them on my road bikes. I use Stans for my mtb's.

  24. #24
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    I am one of those that does not buy off on converting to tubeless as the be all to end all and worth everyone's time, but your situation is where I would recommend it.

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