Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 57
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Spongebob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    650

    Dual Purpose 29er: Mtn and Road. Any Suggestions?

    I have a 27.5 dual suspension converted RFX. I also have a Ti/Carbon road bike. I'm starting to have issues with my shoulders and neck, mostly felt after riding the road bike. I can't put bigger than 25c tires on the road bike. So I thought, since I like mtn much more than road (so dang dangerous around here) that I might get a 29er hardtail and put 32c or 35c on it and ride that on road. Then I thought, why not try riding on the local XC, non technical trails with the 29er with some good mtn tires. (I tried 29ers when they first came out and wasn't impressed). So now I'm thinking a front fork, hopefully with a lockout for road use.
    I've been seeing some 2015 leftovers deeply discounted from $500-$1000, with mostly entry level components. That's ok, since I'm retired and don't have the $ like I used to. Will sell the road bike if this comes to fruition. I'm 6' and 220lbs.
    So, have any of you out there have done this?
    If YES, do you have any guidance or recommendations for me?
    Are any of the internet ordering bike sites recommended? They seem to have much better components much less expensive.
    Thanks
    Bob
    Last edited by Spongebob; 01-07-2016 at 02:49 PM.
    We told you 650b rocks! Riding converted RFX for years!

  2. #2
    Anytime. Anywhere.
    Reputation: Travis Bickle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,543
    I think it's a great idea. I suggest 2 wheel sets if you can swing it. How is the 650b RFX? Mine with 26 had a pretty high BB.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    86
    I have a flat-bar, rigid Mtn bike that I use for road/gravel/ light trail and I love having that in addition to my full sus 29er. Found a great deal on a Niner Air9 RDO 3 years ago with their rigid RDO fork. It's silly light and strong and great for all day adventures. I'm running it with Mavic Cross29ers wheels and Challenge gravel grinders tires setup tubeless. I occasionally put on high volume MTB tires for more rugged trail rides, but normally just use my dually for that. Good luck and have fun.

  4. #4
    CS2
    CS2 is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CS2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    2,625
    Quote Originally Posted by Spongebob View Post
    I have a 27.5 dual suspension converted RFX. I also have a Ti/Carbon road bike. I'm starting to have issues with my shoulders and neck, mostly felt after riding the road bike. I can't put bigger than 25c tires on the road bike. So I thought, since I like mtn much more than road (so dang dangerous around here) that I might get a 29er hardtail and put 32s or 35s on it and ride that on road. Then I thought, why not try riding on the local XC, non technical trails with the 29er with some good mtn tires. (I tried 29ers when they first came out and wasn't impressed). So now I'm thinking a front fork, hopefully with a lockout for road use.
    I've been seeing some 2015 leftovers deeply discounted from $500-$1000, with mostly entry level components. That's ok, since I'm retired and don't have the $ like I used to. Will sell the road bike if this comes to fruition. I'm 6' and 220lbs.
    So, have any of you out there have done this?
    If YES, do you have any guidance or recommendations for me?
    Are any of the internet ordering bike sites recommended? They seem to have much better components much less expensive.
    Thanks
    Bob
    An entry level 29er with a rigid fork should be pretty light and plenty durable for the road. Personally I woud use some big fat smooth tires instead of 35C tires.
    A garage full of steel frames means happiness.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Spongebob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    650
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    I think it's a great idea. I suggest 2 wheel sets if you can swing it. How is the 650b RFX? Mine with 26 had a pretty high BB.
    Two wheelsets so you don't have to change tires back and forth?

    The '09 RFX 27.5 conversion is quite good. I went to a 7.5 X 2" stroke (190mm X 51mm) shock that I put a small spacer in it to reduce travel by a 1/4" so as not to touch the seat tube. I can't remember the exact height of the bb, but its around 13.5" unweighted. Its perfect for where I ride, because I still hit my pedals a lot b/c of the endless rocks we pedal over, using 30% sag. I just sent the RC3 from it to Craig Seekins at Avalanche to have specially tuned. It needs to be more generally plush and not ramp up so much, but still have a platform when climbing. I use a old '05 Pike that works well and b/c its adjustable, works perfect for those long climbs, otherwise I use at 140mm max. I was looking at another frame, but a re-tune is WAY cheaper than a new bike frame and components, since so many component standards have changed.

    Thanks
    Bob
    Last edited by Spongebob; 01-08-2016 at 02:29 PM.
    We told you 650b rocks! Riding converted RFX for years!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Spongebob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    650
    Quote Originally Posted by radred View Post
    I have a flat-bar, rigid Mtn bike that I use for road/gravel/ light trail and I love having that in addition to my full sus 29er. Found a great deal on a Niner Air9 RDO 3 years ago with their rigid RDO fork. It's silly light and strong and great for all day adventures. I'm running it with Mavic Cross29ers wheels and Challenge gravel grinders tires setup tubeless. I occasionally put on high volume MTB tires for more rugged trail rides, but normally just use my dually for that. Good luck and have fun.
    Good ideas. I was first thinking that way, but since my shoulders are getting arthritic and hurt afterwards, I thought that a front suspension, no matter how low end/basic would be better.
    I do see some of these bikesdirect.com 29ers come with tubeless. But buying w/o trying the fit is a little concerning.
    But I'm glad to see you're doing what I'm thinking too and enjoying the heck out of it. A hardtail is always interesting in how it makes your body rethink/reposition for performance.
    Thanks
    Bob
    We told you 650b rocks! Riding converted RFX for years!

  7. #7
    Cactus Cuddler
    Reputation: tehllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,419
    Single wheelset, on a tight budget:
    Find a carbon hardtail that can be made to fit you properly. Spend money getting that fit right. Find some good tubeless ready XC wheels. The carbon is helpful because of the compliance when running higher pressures on the tires.

    Maxxis Aspen's on decent tubeless ready rims (21mm internal width is about right - tons of great options in this range). A bit meh at sustained road speed, passable on hardpack, excellent on gravel road, occasionally sketchy on loose over hard, and rubbish once wet - but that tire pairing is without a doubt the best I've encountered for that specific wide range of use. Desert southwest goatheads haven't managed to kill this setup, and as I've worn out the tread the road capability has gotten better. Really impressed at the longevity, efficiency, and actual usable grip (once I got accustomed to it) from this setup.
    Vittoria Barzo/Peyote and Conti X-King are a close second.

    The fork lockout isn't as big a concern as you thing - find something that's relatively plush, and adjustable (solo air), and can perform well if ran at 15% sag for heavy off-road use. At this pressure, they're surprisingly efficient locked out, and to be honest you want a modern enough fork to have a 15x100TA up front.

    I run this exact setup - but in 29er guise. It's a 22" seat tube unit (and a bike that stands over 6' tall when vertical), to fit me - so a proportional 650B setup wouldn't be bad either. That said, the more modern geometry (tight chainstays, a head tube in the 69° range, 51mm offset fork) really helps with snappier handling, and a relatively lightweight build makes it perform brilliantly (GX/XT type stuff judiciously if it's in the budget, Reba fork - you could be looking at a 24# build fairly easily). Either way, sound approach would be what I just outlined. I even run a dropper post on mine.

    If you can find a frame that uses the same hub standards as your RFX, then you can run a pretty lightweight/pinner wheelset for going quick on road/gravel/XC, and if you elect to get gnarly then just transfer the wheelset over; a dropper post still wouldn't be amiss.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: spyghost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    709
    Go with whatever you have in your stash. For versatility, I'd put a light tire with a bit of bite (Maxxis Aspen) and some short travel fork should do the trick (100mm).

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    4,402
    I used a hybrid bike with a rigid steel fork, and it was great for just riding around. It was more of a trail bike geometry, so it still had the mountain bike feel. Came with 40mm kenda happy medium tires that were good and an cheap 80mm suntour fork. Swapped out to the rigid steel, I put on a 2.1 WTB nano tire and at 45 psi, it was perfect. Not road worthy lightweight, but not bad. The nano's smooth centerline really let it roll smooth, and the volume took off the big hits. I had no problem keeping up with roadies unless I was wearing a baggy jacket or shorts. Wind resistance would get me there.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    446
    The upright position and higher volume tires you can run on a 29er HT might make a sus fork weight more of a liability than a luxury. Fully rigid is far more efficient in my experience and if you are planning to ride on the road, well worth the loss in suspension on most trails around here. We have some nasty stuff here in PA, rooty, rocky stuff and if I need one fork to rule them all, it's rigid carbon.

    Best case get something stoopid light and a couple wheelsets, one with some soft fat tires and one with something around 38c run at 60ish psi for gravel/road use.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: schnee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,397
    Sounds like a plan! My commuter / go anywhere bike is a 29er with 2.4" tires. Good for anything up to 40-ish miles. Nice and cushy.

    You might find yourself not even bothering with the fork lockout, because potholes, bumps and curbs disappear with a good fork. It also lets you more easily avoid traffic by cutting through places that are scary on a road bike. It's my favorite part of urban riding - I get to play around like a 12-year old that's 'not allowed' to do stuff like that.

    Try going tubeless, if your wheels support it. It's nice knowing you don't have to stress out about glass in the street while still having relatively grippy tires.

    If you are going with one wheelset, look into MTB tires that have a dedicated center 'ridge' that lets you ride fast on hardback and concrete.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    5,081
    how do you feel about drop bars? a lot of people end up not liking them because the bikes are designed with aerodynamics, not comfort, in mind and they end up with sore backs. get a bike with a tall head tube or stack of scares and the hoods should be at a comfortable height for long distances.

    there are a lot of "all road" type bikes hitting the market lately. look into the Cannondale Slate- drop bars, short suspension fork, medium sized 650b tires. it's not going to handle single track like a mountain bike and it's not going to be a fast as a road bike but it will bridge the gap well and be comfortable.

    I mentioned the Slate because it's the only thing I can think of that has a suspension fork, in case that is what you are after. otherwise, there are tons of cyclocross-ish bikes out there with rigid forks that can handle some singletrack but still handle well on the road.

  13. #13
    Sam Adams Fan
    Reputation: DG40's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    82
    I was going to buy/build wheels for my mountain bike but decided a new bike would be more feasible.
    This'll be my next ride.
    Giant Seek
    Dual Purpose 29er: Mtn and Road.  Any Suggestions?-seek-3-gray.jpg

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    5,081
    I don't like having a dual-purpose bike. it's always too much of a compromise. however, a bike that is versatile, but has limitations, is always nice to have. it's about impossible to have "one bike to do it all" if you want to ride long miles on pavement and also ride technical singletrack on the same bike.

  15. #15
    Cactus Cuddler
    Reputation: tehllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,419
    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I don't like having a dual-purpose bike. it's always too much of a compromise. however, a bike that is versatile, but has limitations, is always nice to have. it's about impossible to have "one bike to do it all" if you want to ride long miles on pavement and also ride technical singletrack on the same bike.
    So incredibly true. That's why I outlined all the drawbacks on mine - but given that I want to do so much out of only enough storage space for two bicycles, I'm more than happy enough to make those compromises on either extreme. I'm happy with those compromises on longer pavement rides (more comfortable position, and I'm not making fantastic time anywhere anyway), but I feel that a suspension fork is going to outperform rigid on technical singletrack, especially without a high end build in the equation... then again my definition of technical singletrack probably varies from that of many.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    2,202
    29er, get a good fit first. Try for your bars 1-2" higher than your seat, YRMV. That's what works for me. And some big fat slicks, I'm using Geax tattoos in 29x2.3. Maybe something like a Kenda small block 8?

  17. #17
    Chilling out
    Reputation: bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    5,579
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    29er, get a good fit first. Try for your bars 1-2" higher than your seat, YRMV. That's what works for me. And some big fat slicks, I'm using Geax tattoos in 29x2.3. Maybe something like a Kenda small block 8?
    FWIW, I've found the Maxxis Ikon to roll exceedingly well on pave' hardpack and gravel, and with a 2.35" option can take quite a bit of sting out of trail chatter. I think the Conti X-King also rolls super well but even their 2.4" is smaller than the Ikon 2.35. My 29er HT is my "compromise" bike setup like that, for the very purpose. Coupled with a Reba XX fork (locked on on the road) it's decently capable as a trail bike.

    Nothing beats slicks for the road though.

    And I still ride my Yeti SB95 99% of the time, no matter how much pave or dirt road is in the plan. Sure, it loses in flat surface efficiency, but she's just so much more fun to ride everywhere else. :^)

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    62
    My HT is running Maxxis Tread Lite's, 29x2.10, EXO/TR on 21mm rims for street/light trails.

    They're tubeless, light, and very fast.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Spongebob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    650
    I've been looking online and at one local store. Looking at bikes from $500 to $1000. I've zeroed in on a 29er mtn bike, obviously with lower end components. 19". Mostly XCM Suntour forks on the cheaper end to RS forks and tubeless rims on the $1000 end. The biggest problem, which is surprising to me, is the high stand over on these hardtails. I had a high stand over Ellsworth way back when, and 'the boys' got crushed a few times, and boy o boy, I remember that!
    But I'm reading and taking in what you all are saying and I appreciate it.
    Bob
    We told you 650b rocks! Riding converted RFX for years!

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: watts888's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    4,402
    29ers inherently have a higher standover because of the position of the headset caused by big a$$ wheel syndrome. Can't be helped. Luckily, most people can go down a size in 29er bikes and still be fine. I needed at least a 23" frame for 26" bikes, but a 21" frame 29er is perfect.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Spongebob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    650
    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    29ers inherently have a higher standover because of the position of the headset caused by big a$$ wheel syndrome. Can't be helped. Luckily, most people can go down a size in 29er bikes and still be fine. I needed at least a 23" frame for 26" bikes, but a 21" frame 29er is perfect.
    Interesting. I'll have to check out one size down, the 17". There was one there, and I just didn't think it would be viable, so I didn't even try it. I'll also get into the specs/size and see how it compares to my 27.5 full sus with a 45" wheelbase. Also wondering about these 70 degree head tube angles. When I first started out on a 26", it had this HA, and I used to go over the bars all the time. I guess its different with a 29er?
    Thanks
    Bob
    We told you 650b rocks! Riding converted RFX for years!

  22. #22
    my body breaks the falls
    Reputation: twindaddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,323
    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    29ers inherently have a higher standover because of the position of the headset caused by big a$$ wheel syndrome. Can't be helped. Luckily, most people can go down a size in 29er bikes and still be fine. I needed at least a 23" frame for 26" bikes, but a 21" frame 29er is perfect.
    Eh? Not to bicker, but MANY frames are designed with a lower top tube. Many. I would never suggest someone look for a compromise in frame size. Find one that fits.
    As an example, both my Canfield Yelli Screamy and Titus Fireline Evo both have nicely shaped top tubes.

    Dual Purpose 29er: Mtn and Road.  Any Suggestions?-img_0613.jpg

    Dual Purpose 29er: Mtn and Road.  Any Suggestions?-009.jpg

    Back on topic, if you can swing it you won't regret a Ti frame. I've turned my Ti Salsa El Mariachi into something similar to what you're trying to do and it's great. I ride 10 to 20 miles on the road to the dirt and then enjoy the MTB capabilities.
    $500 million for more irresponsible EBRPD land management? No thanks.
    www.noonmeasureww.org

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: armii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    176
    Giant Roam Roam | Giant Bicycles | United States has 700x40 multi use tires.

  24. #24
    Cactus Cuddler
    Reputation: tehllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,419
    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    29ers inherently have a higher standover because of the position of the headset caused by big a$$ wheel syndrome. Can't be helped. Luckily, most people can go down a size in 29er bikes and still be fine. I needed at least a 23" frame for 26" bikes, but a 21" frame 29er is perfect.
    Probably equal parts longer front center geometry being in vogue, but for hardtails the slightly tighter chainstays, longer top tubes, and slacker head tubes make for really versatile bikes, even if they're not the most nimble feeling on boring trails. The borderline silly BB drop offerings actually do a lot for that, when combined with the swoopy top tubes really opens up more secure dismount options - it's not worth as much to me being long-legged, but watching my wife on either of my wagon wheelers tells me that it's an incredibly valuable feature, especially if biking specific clothing isn't always in the cards.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    182
    Have a look at Marin Bikes. They have some( imo ), really nice, retro yet updated stuff for 2016
    Refreshing to see............

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Dual purpose bike
    By CheapsuitG in forum Clydesdales/Tall Riders
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-27-2014, 01:56 PM
  2. Dual Purpose 29er Upgrades
    By tschonis in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-09-2012, 11:37 AM
  3. Dual Purpose
    By nuttymtbr in forum Lights DIY - Do It Yourself
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-03-2012, 10:28 AM
  4. Dual Purpose 29er
    By CS2 in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-13-2011, 12:56 AM
  5. Dual Purpose Goggles
    By alexhusby12 in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 02-17-2011, 08:27 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •