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  1. #1
    The Road Warrior
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    Cycling and Cardiovascular Health: Blood Pressure, Pulse Rate as Indicators?

    So, I have come to the conclusion that I am different than most people when it comes to blood pressure and pulse. Then again, I've been doing cardio exercise for over 10 years. My resting pulse is 38 right now typing this, but my blood pressure is 140/60. The problem is that no medical people that I know have an answer for me when I ask if my blood pressure is going to cause a problem. 29 years old. I've given up asking docs and nurses and searching the internet. What do you guys think?

    There isn't a health forum on here, or I'd ask there.

  2. #2
    The White Jeff W
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    Quote Originally Posted by LandSpeed
    So, I have come to the conclusion that I am different than most people when it comes to blood pressure and pulse. Then again, I've been doing cardio exercise for over 10 years. My resting pulse is 38 right now typing this, but my blood pressure is 140/60. The problem is that no medical people that I know have an answer for me when I ask if my blood pressure is going to cause a problem. 29 years old. I've given up asking docs and nurses and searching the internet. What do you guys think?

    There isn't a health forum on here, or I'd ask there.
    You might x-post that in the XC racing & training forum
    No moss...

  3. #3
    The Road Warrior
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffw-13
    You might x-post that in the XC racing & training forum
    Done. Thanks for the advice

  4. #4
    mtbr member
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    Look for a member JDO I think it is...He is a cardiac surgeon, and Ive seen some good info posted by him in "rider down forum". Probably a good person to ask, although probably would require a zillion tests to get an accurate answer.

  5. #5
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    140 is high blood pressure, when I google high blood pressure I get over 24 million hits, lot of information out there...

  6. #6
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    isn't normal systolic somewhere around 120? and normal dystolic like 80? (120/80) they say up to 139 systolic is "high normal" where 140 is stage 1 hypertention. and in the dystolic department 60 is very low. (hypotention?)

    so i googled "high systolic and low dystolic" and here's what i came up with

    http://chatter.thebeautybottle.com/showthread.php?t=109 post #4 seems helpful

    this was just the first result but try searching more for "high systolic and low diastolic/dystolic (sp?))

  7. #7
    Professional Crastinator
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    Quote Originally Posted by LandSpeed
    So, I have come to the conclusion that I am different than most people when it comes to blood pressure and pulse. Then again, I've been doing cardio exercise for over 10 years. My resting pulse is 38 right now typing this, but my blood pressure is 140/60. The problem is that no medical people that I know have an answer for me when I ask if my blood pressure is going to cause a problem. 29 years old. I've given up asking docs and nurses and searching the internet. What do you guys think?

    There isn't a health forum on here, or I'd ask there.
    Indicator of what?

    I hate to muddy the waters with too much conjecture but I will offer this: maybe you should go for a stress test. They will monitor all your particulars and you will have medical personnel on hand. I think what you are after is whether or not your BP is an indicator of something wrong(?) If your BP does not drift into the danger zone under extreme effort, then you can go with confidence. Has it always been pretty much the same?

    My opinion on pulse is that it is a relative indication, not an actual indication of your output. Sure, it tells you whether your body can maybe do more, but there are too many other factors that can affect your [power] output. I use gear x cadence or gear inches x cadence as my power meter (yes, I know that doesn't exactly work out in Watts, but it compares to the indoor trainer which does have known resistance, in Watts, at various speeds). Pulse is often a measure of perceived output.

    btw - I am not a doctor, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

    I hope you find your answer,
    -F

    PS - you say "cardio exercise", but for different people that means very different things - intensity, duration, which muscle(s)/groups,...

  8. #8
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    LOL at stress tests - I'm 65yrs, BP is 170 over 95, I'm on medication for high blood pressure. Resting HR is 47 (+ or - 2) - last time i saw a 'specialist' he considered putting in a pacemaker as my HR is too low!

    Sent for a stress test and as per normal for me, as i exercise my HR rises and BP drops. The stress test used 220 minus age to estimate max HR (155)- which as we know is, err shall we say, innacurate. Once they got to 75% of the estimated max they stop testing - except my max is about 170+ and typically 150 to 155 is my target zone for training and lactate thresold is approx 157/8.

    Then the new fitness instructor wanted to record my fitness level so they put me on to a stationery bike and start testing, despite telling them it was a waste of time and wouldn't work as they had me on a cadence of 80 at the lowest resistance level to start! - as predicted they couldnt get my heart rate up over 135 in the time the test takes.

    But go to a pecialist and read wot Fleas sez. Get yourself a cuff BP tester (not a wrist one, too innacurate) and test yourself and record the results (including HR) on a spreadsheet and graph them, and record the conditions also - gives a better indicator than a one off visit to the Dr.

    FWIW.

  9. #9
    The Road Warrior
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    You guys are onto something, I think. What do you think they'd do in the stress test? Show me pictures of oprah's thighs and see what happens to my vital signs? I'm kidding. Yeah, still searching, still no answers. Thanks for the replies so far.

  10. #10
    808+909 = Party Good Time
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    I think you are talking to the wrong medical people. A good doctor will be able to help with that question... not forums or the internet.

    140 is on the high side, 60 is on the low. The 60 is probably of biggest concern. 120/80 is the recommended guideline for a healthy 25 yo male. At the age of 29 and being fit you probably should get yourself professionally checked out.

    A good doctor will be able to help, I feel you haven't been to a decent doctor yet.

    I am a researcher for cardiovascular drug trials. I am not qualified to diagnose but I am qualified to suggest you need a good doctor and some advice.

  11. #11
    MTB B'dos
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    I'm no doc, but I've done a little research for both myself and training and from last year when my Mum had some issues due to high BP, here's what I found out.....

    Most people know the "good" numbers you should have 120/80, but most don't know what those numbers mean, so here it is... 120, the higher number is the pressure it takes to compress the vessel enough to stop flow. 80 the lower number is an indicator of how fast the vessel opens back up - elasticity - so this is in fact the more important number you need to keep an eye on.

    My Mum is 80 and she has always had high BP, she had an argument with someone and got very stressed and happened to have a doc app the same day, he flipped because her BP was over 200 and gave her medication to bring it back down to 120, problem is hers is normally about 140 so when it went that low she fainted. We have been keeping an eye on her and as she says, it's always like 140-150/80-90, she says she's never had it lower and she does a lot for an 80 year old. Best advice is to buy a cuff monitor and keep a log and see how it goes, take it when you first wake up, then during the day, se how the numbers vary, take it right after exercise to see what effect that has on it, then find a try to find a doc who doesn't think he's god and knows it all and show them the data.

    FYI, the old 120/80 works fine for "normal" people, but it has been found that for people who are active/athletes that 110/70 is considered more normal as their vessels are generally more pliable and elastic, hence take less pressure to restrict and bounce back faster.

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