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  1. #1
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    cornering on a 29er

    Hi all. I'm a newbie mountain bike rider and I just bought my first bike. It's a 29er. My question is how do I effectively corner on a 29er? My first two rides I've almost wiped out, whereas it seems like the guys on the 26er bikes when around the corners faster. Should I be slowing down more than the other guys to turn the corners? Is there a technique that I'm missing?

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    I noticed on my 29er vs 26er it requires leaning more.

  3. #3
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    You didn't say, but are the others more experienced riders? Cornering is a skill like any other, and has to be learned. Take a look at this page, and watch the video. It'll get you headed in the right direction.

    http://www.nsmb.com/5214-hey-coach-ep-1/
    "Back off, man. I'm a scientist." - Dr. Peter Venkman

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    Quote Originally Posted by william_s View Post
    Hi all. I'm a newbie mountain bike rider and I just bought my first bike. It's a 29er. My question is how do I effectively corner on a 29er? My first two rides I've almost wiped out, whereas it seems like the guys on the 26er bikes when around the corners faster. Should I be slowing down more than the other guys to turn the corners? Is there a technique that I'm missing?
    Slow down, not because it is a 29er but because you are a newbie.

    Ride your ride and and don't worry about what others are doing or you will get hurt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by evasive View Post
    You didn't say, but are the others more experienced riders? Cornering is a skill like any other, and has to be learned. Take a look at this page, and watch the video. It'll get you headed in the right direction.

    Hey Coach! Ep. 1 - Mountain Bike Reviews, News, Photo and Video
    LOL @ "point your pecker".

    Great video, btw.

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    Here's another video
    .Cornering with Fabien Barel - YouTube
    Fabien shows a practicing maneuver on flat pavement. It's the first step. Second is on a paved hill. Third is on a grass hill. Work it until you're comfortable. Throw in hip twists and drive finishing after.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Here's another video
    .Cornering with Fabien Barel - YouTube
    Fabien shows a practicing maneuver on flat pavement. It's the first step. Second is on a paved hill. Third is on a grass hill. Work it until you're comfortable. Throw in hip twists and drive finishing after.
    Really good video

  8. #8
    AZ
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    Grip it and rip it.

  9. #9
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    Lean your bike into the turn ehhLLRickee Bouh-bee.

    Don't consider myself a newb, but both vids were helpful to me. Thanks.

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    The special technique is to ride more. That's pretty much it. Put in 60-90 hours and let us know how it's going.

  11. #11
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    hey, thanks for the two videos. Just what i was looking for. I can't help but to notice that the bikes in the two videos were 26er bikes. It makes me think that 26ers corner better than 29ers. I think of it in terms of a bmx bike verses a 10 speed street bike. It's obvious that the bmx bike will corner better than the 10 speed bike regardless of the nobby tires. I've only started riding for a week now, but I'm the athletic type and I push to learn fast. Its just how I am, but it's true that I don't want to kill myself. That is why I want to learn the technique fast

    I have a 29er bike, so if I can get really good at the technique, then the type of wheels shouldn't make much of a difference in cornering when compared to the average rider. By far, I've noticed in my two rides, that 29ers are fast on the downhill and straight away. It's just that I need to get down the cornering.

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    Actually, the yellow bike from the first video is a tallboy LTc 29er (correct me if i`m wrong).
    I own a 29er and a 26er, and from my experience there`s not much difference in cornering those two. Its a geometry of a bike and your skills that matters, not wheel size.

    Quote Originally Posted by william_s View Post
    My question is how do I effectively corner on a 29er?
    The techniques are the same as on 26er..

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    Quote Originally Posted by william_s View Post
    It makes me think that 26ers corner better than 29ers.
    You're overthinking it and I cannot blame you, given the amount of 26-29 handling difference topics on the internet.

    At your experience level, it's about learning basic skills and they are completely the same for 26" or 29". There is NO different handling skill required for 29". It just requires a bit of adaptation if a rider comes from 26", but you do not have that problem.

    Stop thinking about it, check the video's, read some about handling skills (Brian Lopes has a really good book on it) and go ride to try out stuff, learn and build experience.

  14. #14
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    In depth cornering techniques in the post below. It starts around the 15:30 and go on about cornering till about 38:20. More videos with in the thread to help you as well.

    Mountain Biking Skills Videos


    Instructions provided by Simon Lawton and Lars Sternberg.


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    Don't believe the hype. I had a guy tell me could pass me on the inside of all the switchbacks on our local loop on his 26er because I was on a 29er. Not only could he not do it, he couldn't get close enough to do it if there had been room there. The fact is, you are still learning, you need to look further ahead, further through the turns, learn the bike handling skills - you'll get there, if you don't kill yourself trying to keep up with more experienced riders at first. There's nothing wrong with the way 29ers handle.

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    You say "almost wiped out" well... You need to actually wipe out several times to really get fast cornering down. Lessons learned by blood seem to stick better :-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by william_s View Post
    I've only started riding for a week now, but I'm the athletic type and I push to learn fast. Its just how I am, but it's true that I don't want to kill myself. That is why I want to learn the technique fast
    Although people do learn at different rates and the best way to learn can sometimes be to push the envelope and lean by doing and making mistakes. However, trying to push too hard too fast can result in skipping important techniques and skills.

    Just go out and have fun and don't worry about what the others are doing.

    I have ridden motorcycles for years and seen people try to push their learning curve too much. Sure, they rode fast, but they also rode stupid and always ended up hurting themselves.

    Slow and steady wins the race.

  18. #18
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    Another aspect to think about is fork rake, most 29'er are set up for XC. AM bikes have a "choppered" fork and DH bikes have the most relaxed rake. That being said, if you have a nice mid grade 29'er its head angle is about 71.5 deg, or 90 - 71.5 = 18.5 deg rake. DH bikes are closer to 61 deg or 29 deg rake. This means that your 29'er will be more "twich'ie" in the corners. Since older 26'er were all Mtn bikes rake will be in the mid to high 20's. If you are used to riding this style of bike your turning would be much quicker and cause you to over turn and wash out your front tire. I am not taking away anything said above because it is very true that you need to learn to ride over time. I too came off a mid 90's 26'er and when I got on my XC 29'er I noticed right away that it turned much quicker and I had to adapt. Now when I get back on my 26'er it feels like I have to push my turns much more to keep my speed up while on my 29'er I can kill single track and go much quicker through switch backs.

    My 2 cents.

    Mark
    2012 XXL Carve Expert

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by william_s View Post
    By far, I've noticed in my two rides, that 29ers are fast on the downhill and straight away. It's just that I need to get down the cornering.
    Any schmuck can go fast down a hill and in a straight line. It takes training and strength to go fast uphill, practice and skill to go fast around corners. Go ride your bike more and you will figure it out.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by william_s View Post
    Hi all. I'm a newbie mountain bike rider and I just bought my first bike. It's a 29er. My question is how do I effectively corner on a 29er? My first two rides I've almost wiped out, whereas it seems like the guys on the 26er bikes when around the corners faster. Should I be slowing down more than the other guys to turn the corners? Is there a technique that I'm missing?
    Countersteer and lean the bike while keeping your body weight centered over the contact patch (counter-lean). Good thread on cornering technique is available here.

    Picture from that thread that is a good example of countersteer and counter-lean combined...

    732959d1351104652-cornering-technique-need-advice-jeff_crop

    You'll find with practice that once you groove the proper technique, the big wheels really allow you to hook up on corners - even with minimal tread 29"er tires.

    Nobody has mentioned it yet, but I will bring up the issue of air pressure in your tires as well as ask what front tire you have on your new bike. To get the best traction, you will not want your air pressure to be too high (like say anything over 30 psi). While you are learning on the new big wheeled bike, you might want to experiment with your tire's air pressure. I prefer pressures like 19 - 24 psi up front for my tires.

    Another suggestion, while you are learning, is to run a front tire that's got some nice meaty knobs on it to help up front and give you the confidence to rail the corners. A tire like a Nobby Nic 2.35, a Rampage 2.35, Maxxis Ardent 2.4, a Nevegal 2.2, a Racing Ralph 2.4, a Mountain King 2.4, a Fire XC Pro, etc... are all good front end choices and may just be the additional boost you need.

    BB

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Indik View Post
    Actually, the yellow bike from the first video is a tallboy LTc 29er (correct me if i`m wrong).
    I own a 29er and a 26er, and from my experience there`s not much difference in cornering those two. Its a geometry of a bike and your skills that matters, not wheel size.

    The techniques are the same as on 26er..
    No, you're right. Seb Kemp is riding a TBLTc in that video.
    "Back off, man. I'm a scientist." - Dr. Peter Venkman

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  22. #22
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    Lots of great advice and video so far. Be sure to check out these other discussions on cornering too.


    Whats the best way to take flat downhill sweepers with loose surface?

    Welcome to norcal's cornering clinic

  23. #23
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    when you go from switchback to switchback and have to shift your weight from side to side, do you pedal backwards or forwards? In the video he seemed to pedal backwards for shifts to the left and forwards for shifts to the right. I keep getting caught having to do a full half revolution pedal rather than 1/4 when shifting weight on cascading switchbacks

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by pelts79 View Post
    I noticed on my 29er vs 26er it requires leaning more.
    Thats not a wheelsize issue, thats a geometry issue. I've had steep-geo bikes that steered very upright and slacker bikes that required more carving/leaning to handle. Two different styles of getting around the turn. Each is better in certain terrain though.

    My current 29er has steeper geometry than my old 26 and feels less carvy. Still fun. You get used to the difference.

  25. #25
    Jkj
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    All the basic skills mentioned above are needed. All are the same as for 26 to 29er bike. Only different is on 29er bike you needs to choose the outer line first then as you turn you move toward the inner line. Just practice and rise more, the bike and your body will tell you cheer

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