Page 7 of 21 FirstFirst ... 3456789101117 ... LastLast
Results 601 to 700 of 2009
  1. #601
    AOK
    AOK is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: AOK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,903
    Quote Originally Posted by gollub01 View Post
    2012 Nimble 9 frames will be here next month ! Get your orders in because these new colors won't last !

    in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, United States - photo by gollub01 - Pinkbike.com
    Any changes for 2012 other than the colors?

  2. #602
    Computer Geek
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    82
    Wow, those certainly look sweet! I must confess, I did not read through the whole thread, I just kind looked at the pics, how much did they run you?

  3. #603
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cSquared's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    302
    We have white, orange, lime and the purple this round. And the XL.
    Should be in the States- mid Feb.

  4. #604
    errr...
    Reputation: chase1963's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    310
    Quote Originally Posted by cSquared View Post
    We have white, orange, lime and the purple this round. And the XL.
    Should be in the States- mid Feb.
    Any pic's of the white and orange ? Metallic paint ? The purple looks great. Thanks.

  5. #605
    WNC Native
    Reputation: nitrousjunky's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,292
    Quote Originally Posted by cSquared View Post
    We have white, orange, lime and the purple this round. And the XL.
    Should be in the States- mid Feb.
    Do you have a geometry chart for the XL yet?? If not, can you tell us Reach, ETT, Wheelbase and standover?

    Thanks
    "I ride to clear my head, my head is clearer when I'm riding SS. Therefore, I choose to ride SS."~ Fullrange Drew

  6. #606
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    51
    I'm also interested in the XL geo. and orange, yay!

  7. #607
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eurospek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,464
    Quote Originally Posted by cSquared View Post
    We have white, orange, lime and the purple this round. And the XL.
    Should be in the States- mid Feb.
    Quote Originally Posted by nitrousjunky View Post
    Do you have a geometry chart for the XL yet?? If not, can you tell us Reach, ETT, Wheelbase and standover?

    Thanks
    konahonzo

  8. #608
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtbnachos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    566
    Ahhhh I want the white! Oh wait I already got blue It's all good!

  9. #609
    errr...
    Reputation: chase1963's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    310
    I'd like to be able to use a Niner 15m RDO fork while were at it.

  10. #610
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    I'm going to be totally envious of those that pick up an orange frame. Especially if it glows in the dark.

  11. #611
    Basura Blanca
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,767
    Same here. My black size L N9 arrived Monday, and as much as I love the Johnny Cash look, I'll miss my Snuffleupagus Orange Jabber once I swap the parts over.

    Quote Originally Posted by p nut View Post
    I'm going to be totally envious of those that pick up an orange frame. Especially if it glows in the dark.

  12. #612
    Professional Crastinator
    Reputation: Fleas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    4,613
    Here are some numbers from my freshly assembled N9 with VooDoo Zombie 500 fork (don't ask, there aren't any left), ardent 2.4 up front, Ignitor 2.1 in back:

    BB height = 11.75-11.875 (the Ignitor is somewhat spent, but it works great for indoors)
    Head Angle = 69.5

    I have the sliders about 1/2 way back. I doubt I would want them farther forward based on how effortlessly it wheelies in my basement. Plus, the front drlr is sorta close to the tire. It navigates my tight and twisty basement even with 30" bars on it - although my doorframe did take a little abuse.

    It's ride-able but still needs it's own seat post and saddle, stem (when I determine what length I think I need), and hoses trimmed.

    Pix forthcoming once it's sorted out (although I think it's already gawjus).

    Need to build some fresh wheels, too, which may be awhile. The front, which is consistently my problem area, is already an American Classic hub with a Velocity Blunt (not SL) rim. The rear is a slightly dinged, but still intact AC factory wheel (4 seasons!).
    I don't think I could do much better for the $$$.[/commercial]

    -F

  13. #613
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    53
    Hello,

    any experiences with the Nimble 9 equipped with a rigid fork (if Yes - with which fork, please) , please ?

    thanks a lot

    Ralph

  14. #614
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,830
    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post
    Here are some numbers from my freshly assembled N9 with VooDoo Zombie 500 fork (don't ask, there aren't any left), ardent 2.4 up front, Ignitor 2.1 in back:

    BB height = 11.75-11.875 (the Ignitor is somewhat spent, but it works great for indoors)
    Head Angle = 69.5

    I have the sliders about 1/2 way back. I doubt I would want them farther forward based on how effortlessly it wheelies in my basement. Plus, the front drlr is sorta close to the tire. It navigates my tight and twisty basement even with 30" bars on it - although my doorframe did take a little abuse.

    It's ride-able but still needs it's own seat post and saddle, stem (when I determine what length I think I need), and hoses trimmed.

    Pix forthcoming once it's sorted out (although I think it's already gawjus).

    Need to build some fresh wheels, too, which may be awhile. The front, which is consistently my problem area, is already an American Classic hub with a Velocity Blunt (not SL) rim. The rear is a slightly dinged, but still intact AC factory wheel (4 seasons!).
    I don't think I could do much better for the $$$.[/commercial]

    -F
    Quote Originally Posted by Beezle Bug View Post
    Hello,

    any experiences with the Nimble 9 equipped with a rigid fork (if Yes - with which fork, please) , please ?

    thanks a lot

    Ralph
    The post right above yours and many more. Don't be afraid to read the thread, or search it. You'll be surprised what you find, more than asking those who have posted to post the same information again.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  15. #615
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Just J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,524
    These bikes look really nice, similar geometry to my old Dillinger too. Hmmm....

  16. #616
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by Just J View Post
    These bikes look really nice, similar geometry to my old Dillinger too. Hmmm....
    I haven't ridden a Dilinger, but the Nimble is more of an AM-ish frame, whereas the Dillinger is an XC frame. I think you will notice a big difference between the two, specifically in the handling department.

  17. #617
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Just J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,524
    Quote Originally Posted by p nut View Post
    I haven't ridden a Dilinger, but the Nimble is more of an AM-ish frame, whereas the Dillinger is an XC frame. I think you will notice a big difference between the two, specifically in the handling department.
    How does the Nimble climb?

  18. #618
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Just J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,524
    Sounds like the ideal 29r for round these parts, i may have to consider building one up, thanks p_nut

  19. #619
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Climbs great. Puts down the power better, IMO, due to the short chain stays. The front is higher, so you do need to watch that a little closer, but not a big deal. On tech climbs, it's far better than my old bikes with 17"+ CS, as I can maneuver around stuff better. Lifting the front tire up and over is easier as well.

  20. #620
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    983
    Here's mine just built - UK via previous owner in Denmark (thanks Rasmus!).

  21. #621
    WNC Native
    Reputation: nitrousjunky's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,292
    Quote Originally Posted by Clink View Post
    Here's mine just built - UK via previous owner in Denmark (thanks Rasmus!).
    Looks sweet, that's the color Nimble I was after until I snagged my Yelli. Let us know your thoughts on that front tire too!
    "I ride to clear my head, my head is clearer when I'm riding SS. Therefore, I choose to ride SS."~ Fullrange Drew

  22. #622
    Professional Crastinator
    Reputation: Fleas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    4,613
    Quote Originally Posted by Beezle Bug View Post
    Hello,

    any experiences with the Nimble 9 equipped with a rigid fork (if Yes - with which fork, please) , please ?

    thanks a lot

    Ralph
    Um... yes.

    Yeah, the Zombie 500 is probably the longest rigid fork in use on these things (if you can find one). Anything shorter will give you lower BB, steeper HA, and generally quicker steering (less fork trail) - all things that I feel I've had enough of over the years.

    I thought the front would be a little flip-floppy, but even in my basement where I'm going about 5 mph I can almost ride no-hands. Compared to my old MCR it already feels like it wants to play instead of race. Although I would not hesitate to race it. Maiden voyage on Wed. with a full report in the morning. I can't even wait!

    -F

  23. #623
    hispanic mechanic
    Reputation: sslos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,494
    Just finished the El Paso Puzzler on my Nimble 9. Brutal, brutal course. 50 miles, but more suffering than I've ever experienced on a bike.
    7,000' of climbing, all of it rocky. I was even more impressed with the N9 than I was before. This is a brilliant bike!
    Sorry, pretty tired and beat up right now, apologies for the disjointed post.

    Los
    Whiskey is my yoga.

    dongerparty.com

  24. #624
    What day are we riding?
    Reputation: Rockin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,088
    Quote Originally Posted by AOK View Post
    Any changes for 2012 other than the colors?
    I heard rumors that there will be mounts for three bottle cages like the Yelli.

    Signing up for an orange - size large.

  25. #625
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eurospek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,464
    Quote Originally Posted by Rockin View Post
    I heard rumors that there will be mounts for three bottle cages like the Yelli.

    Signing up for an orange - size large.
    That's 2 too many. Never really found the point of 3 mounts like on the Yelli. Pointless IMO.
    konahonzo

  26. #626
    All That is Man
    Reputation: Zero Signal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    334
    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek View Post
    That's 2 too many. Never really found the point of 3 mounts like on the Yelli. Pointless IMO.
    Because some of us live in the desert and have this crazy thing called wilderness where there is no water.

    I want me an orange one. Today. So I can stare at it for months in my office while it's in hiding from my wife.
    John

  27. #627
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eurospek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,464
    Quote Originally Posted by Zero Signal View Post
    Because some of us live in the desert and have this crazy thing called wilderness where there is no water.

    I want me an orange one. Today. So I can stare at it for months in my office while it's in hiding from my wife.
    Ever heard of a hydration pack? One can easily carry more water than in 3 water bottles. Plus with the smaller size frames, water bottle bosses interfere with dropping the seat for the descents.
    konahonzo

  28. #628
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    16
    Not a great photo, but thanks to "edgerat" I've been riding this for a few weeks. Amazing ride!


  29. #629
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Are those xtr cranks working for you? I thought I read they would be too narrow to clear the cs.

  30. #630
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    16
    Lesson learned on the first ride, hit the stays under power a few times, but not all the time. I then put in an additional spacer on the drive side and I've done some good miles and climbing with no issues so far. Chainline is still intact as well.

  31. #631
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,830
    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek View Post
    Ever heard of a hydration pack? One can easily carry more water than in 3 water bottles. Plus with the smaller size frames, water bottle bosses interfere with dropping the seat for the descents.
    Do you know how hot hydration packs are at 100 degree plus temperatures? And how they mess with your low back if you have back issues?

    In places like this, three bottle mounts can be good.

    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  32. #632
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by rml_7 View Post
    Lesson learned on the first ride, hit the stays under power a few times, but not all the time. I then put in an additional spacer on the drive side and I've done some good miles and climbing with no issues so far. Chainline is still intact as well.
    I see. I think I'll stick to my XT's, but good to hear you can at least make xtr's work.

  33. #633
    What day are we riding?
    Reputation: Rockin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,088
    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek View Post
    That's 2 too many. Never really found the point of 3 mounts like on the Yelli. Pointless IMO.
    I do endurance mountain bike races, many unsupported. The more, the merrier for me. There have been times where I have used all three bottle mounts on a bike plus carrying two bladders in my pack. So pointless from your perspective is awesome from mine as I was looking to get one, add mounts, sandblast, and re-powdercoat.

  34. #634
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,830
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    i've ridden quite a few of these now and have tried to like them, but the overly slack head angles and the heavy frame weight makes the bike a pig and way too slow.

    it's like riding a big marshmallow. what is the point of making a nimble rearend and a dead slow front angle?
    are people that lame that they have to slow down the steering to the point of fighting the front end?

    i feel like i am riding a chopper?
    So, it is not a bike for you. Bye bye.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  35. #635
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BikeShopMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    218
    i've ridden quite a few of these now and have tried to like them, but the overly slack head angles and the heavy frame weight makes the bike a pig and way too slow.

    it's like riding a big marshmallow. what is the point of making a nimble rearend and a dead slow front angle?
    are people that lame that they have to slow down the steering to the point of fighting the front end?

    i feel like i am riding a chopper?
    so my afro now sticks out of my helmet.

  36. #636
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BikeShopMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus View Post
    So, it is not a bike for you. Bye bye.
    people gotta know that this frame is flawed.....
    so my afro now sticks out of my helmet.

  37. #637
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    983
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    people gotta know that this frame is flawed.....
    Are you riding the same bike? Granted it's not a light frame but the short rear end/slacker ha works. I would have thought a steep ha and short stays would be exciting to say the least.

  38. #638
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    people gotta know that this frame is flawed.....
    It's subjective. It doesn't wok for you. Ok. But that doesn't make the frame "flawed".

  39. #639
    West Chester, PA
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,178
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    people gotta know that this frame is flawed.....
    Well, it's page 26 and you're the voice of a very small, possibly single person, minority.

  40. #640
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eurospek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,464
    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus View Post
    Do you know how hot hydration packs are at 100 degree plus temperatures? And how they mess with your low back if you have back issues?

    In places like this, three bottle mounts can be good.

    If I rode in scenery like that, I could live with 6 water mounts on my frame. So jealous.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rockin View Post
    I do endurance mountain bike races, many unsupported. The more, the merrier for me. There have been times where I have used all three bottle mounts on a bike plus carrying two bladders in my pack. So pointless from your perspective is awesome from mine as I was looking to get one, add mounts, sandblast, and re-powdercoat.
    konahonzo

  41. #641
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    415
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    people gotta know that this frame is flawed.....
    pedal faster

  42. #642
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,411
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    i've ridden quite a few of these now and have tried to like them, but the overly slack head angles and the heavy frame weight makes the bike a pig and way too slow.

    it's like riding a big marshmallow. what is the point of making a nimble rearend and a dead slow front angle?
    are people that lame that they have to slow down the steering to the point of fighting the front end?

    i feel like i am riding a chopper?
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    people gotta know that this frame is flawed.....
    What was your setup? Curious since many others don't feel this way. Mine is set up with a rigid fork, and while the front is higher than my last bike, it is def. not a chopper. I don't find the front end any slower, but rather I find it more controller/refined.

    The short stays make the back of the bike stiffer too. What do you feel is 'marshmallowy' about the bike?

  43. #643
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    106
    Quote Originally Posted by rml_7 View Post
    I then put in an additional spacer on the drive side and I've done some good miles and climbing with no issues so far.
    how many spacers are there?

  44. #644
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BikeShopMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    What was your setup? Curious since many others don't feel this way. Mine is set up with a rigid fork, and while the front is higher than my last bike, it is def. not a chopper. I don't find the front end any slower, but rather I find it more controller/refined.

    The short stays make the back of the bike stiffer too. What do you feel is 'marshmallowy' about the bike?
    have now ridden ones with suspension correct 80mm, 100mm, 120mm rigid forks. also with front suspension 100mm, 120mm.

    the front wheel feels way too far pushed out and makes for slow steering, like a damper is in place. might as well be riding my dh bike with 8" out front.

    i remember others complaining about the same problem, so its not just me.

    slack HA angles are good for long travel suspension bikes that need to address very steep or very rocky terrain. this bike being rigid or hardtail is not in that category.
    so my afro now sticks out of my helmet.

  45. #645
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,411
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    have now ridden ones with suspension correct 80mm, 100mm, 120mm rigid forks. also with front suspension 100mm, 120mm.

    the front wheel feels way too far pushed out and makes for slow steering, like a damper is in place. might as well be riding my dh bike with 8" out front.

    i remember others complaining about the same problem, so its not just me.

    slack HA angles are good for long travel suspension bikes that need to address very steep or very rocky terrain. this bike being rigid or hardtail is not in that category.
    Interesting. I ride in the technical North East, and have found this frame to be great at navigating the rooty, rocky trails here. It's not 100% perfect. but it's pretty damn good when compared to steeper ha'd bikes. I once felt that a steep ha was needed around here (back in my 26'r days,) but have since changed my mind as I ride more challenging trails.

  46. #646
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldHouseMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,690
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    have now ridden ones with suspension correct 80mm, 100mm, 120mm rigid forks. also with front suspension 100mm, 120mm.

    the front wheel feels way too far pushed out and makes for slow steering, like a damper is in place. might as well be riding my dh bike with 8" out front.

    i remember others complaining about the same problem, so its not just me.

    slack HA angles are good for long travel suspension bikes that need to address very steep or very rocky terrain. this bike being rigid or hardtail is not in that category.
    I haven't ridden a Nimble9 yet, but do ride a Yelli Screamy. By my experience with the YS, I am thoroughly looking forward to replacing my broken Sir9 with an overweight raked out rigid Nimble9.

    Although I do know the Sir9's original purpose was not meant to be ridden at places like Black Rock, some of us do enjoy ridding rigid bikes over steep technical trails.

    To each there own.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  47. #647
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,411
    Quote Originally Posted by OldHouseMan View Post
    some of us do enjoy ridding rigid bikes over steep technical trails.

    To each there own.
    I know I do, and the Nimble is great for that.

  48. #648
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MMcG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    9,606
    Does anyone know the trail figure for a Nimble 9 with a 120mm fork up front on it?

  49. #649
    West Chester, PA
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,178
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    have now ridden ones with suspension correct 80mm, 100mm, 120mm rigid forks. also with front suspension 100mm, 120mm.

    the front wheel feels way too far pushed out and makes for slow steering, like a damper is in place. might as well be riding my dh bike with 8" out front.

    i remember others complaining about the same problem, so its not just me.

    slack HA angles are good for long travel suspension bikes that need to address very steep or very rocky terrain. this bike being rigid or hardtail is not in that category.
    I honestly don't follow you. 70 degrees with an 80mm fork is not "slack". My yelli has 100mm on it (69 degrees) and the thing rips through tight rhythmic sections at my local trails. There's a few sections I'm thinking of that usually required braking on my previous bikes so I didn't overshoot turns. I'm going through those much faster on the yelli (at least it feels faster) without braking.

    I understand you don't think the bikes work for you, but your blanket statements about the design being wrong is a bit much. Theres so many people from east coast to west coast, with many different forks, that are happy.

  50. #650
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BikeShopMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    218

    Bonking ... not feelin' well

    Quote Originally Posted by 92gli View Post
    I honestly don't follow you. 70 degrees with an 80mm fork is not "slack". My yelli has 100mm on it (69 degrees) and the thing rips through tight rhythmic sections at my local trails. There's a few sections I'm thinking of that usually required braking on my previous bikes so I didn't overshoot turns. I'm going through those much faster on the yelli (at least it feels faster) without braking.

    I understand you don't think the bikes work for you, but your blanket statements about the design being wrong is a bit much. Theres so many people from east coast to west coast, with many different forks, that are happy.



    70 degrees is very slack. just cause you need to slow down your steering so your comfortable does not make it right.

    most of the people on this 29er forum ride bikes with steeper head angles and prefer it. the small minority that need to dumb down their ride so they can ride are mostly here. no wonder there is soo much negativity about this.

    doesn't make sense to create a frame with the possibility of nimble quick handling and then slow it down with a slack head angle. lets put a huge V8 in a car and then make the car weigh a million pounds so it negates all that horsepower........
    so my afro now sticks out of my helmet.

  51. #651
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,830
    You remind of my my grandpa. "I'm done, dinner if over, clear the table."
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  52. #652
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jncarpenter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    6,827
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    70 degrees is very slack.
    ROFLMAO...really?

    NOT!


  53. #653
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BikeShopMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by jncarpenter View Post
    ROFLMAO...really?

    NOT!
    sure it is, proof,

    most bikes with 70 degrees or slacker are:

    downhill bikes
    chopper bikes
    beach cruisers
    and a select few of new short chainstay 29ers.

    now, your gonna tell me those bikes are known for quick steering?

    argue all you want, but when "you" are wrong, your just wrong.
    so my afro now sticks out of my helmet.

  54. #654
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,411
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    sure it is, proof,

    most bikes with 70 degrees or slacker are:

    downhill bikes
    chopper bikes
    beach cruisers
    and a select few of new short chainstay 29ers.

    now, your gonna tell me those bikes are known for quick steering?

    argue all you want, but when "you" are wrong, your just wrong.
    At first I was giving you the benefit of the doubt by being curious about your view point. Now I know that you're just an idiot.

    Put a 120mm of travel on a 72* ha bike, and hit a bump. Bye bye 72*. Your quick steering is now overly twitchy. Hit a steep descent with the same bike; are you able to control it without going over the bars? Probably not. Perhaps your trails are all smooth, flat, and possibly paved, but for those of us that ride in areas with extreme variety, the head angle works wonders.

  55. #655
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    177
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    sure it is, proof,

    most bikes with 70 degrees or slacker are:

    downhill bikes
    chopper bikes
    beach cruisers
    and a select few of new short chainstay 29ers.
    Oh and Trek's best selling mountain bike, the Fuel EX has a 68* HA, umm lets see, Specialized Safire 68.5*, Santa Cruz Blur TRc 68*. All these bikes are in the 120-130mm travel range - not downhill, not chopper or beach cruiser bikes. It's called all mountain.

    As far as 29er hardtails go, the Kona Honzo is 68* and the Transition Transam 29 is 68.5*.

    I believe all of these bikes I mention would have a pretty similar A2C leading to about the same amount of trail.

    As for the recipe of short chainstay and slacker fork... having your weight back over the rear wheel makes it easier to lift the front end right? Thus making it easier to steer quickly by lifting the front end and moving it to where you want. Not the most efficient (read: XC) style of turning but you bought an AM bike right? Your idea that a nervous front end is better so you can get around switchbacks easier is right in line with the notion that skinny tires are faster. This is an AM bike that is optimized for trails that are not smooth...

  56. #656
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BikeShopMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    218
    look how funny you look all trying to rationalize your wrongness.


    sure leaning back with your butt behind the tire is going to make an effect on the bike. who rides like that? a poorly designed bike? yes! change your riding style to make up for bad design?

    sure i said there are a few 29ers out there that have this kind of "slack" design. doesn't make them any good. right!

    sure there are 26" downhill(and "all mountain") bikes with slack designs. so people can feel stable at speed, the steering was slowed down. i got no problem riding my steeper 29ers at speed over any terrain.

    normal head tube angles are not twitchy unless they approach track bike angles. even then there is no way to get a chainstay that short due to larger tires we ride.


    don't need a lecture on whats out there as i am riding a kona unit until my waltworks gets ordered and built up. the kona suffers from the same design flaw as the canfield, just not as heavy, way cheaper, better built, available years ago and nicer looking.


    go ahead keep arguing your useless point, you either work for them or are embarrassed that you spent soo much money on this frame ya gotta defend it now.
    so my afro now sticks out of my helmet.

  57. #657
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldHouseMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,690
    Quote Originally Posted by Mutantclover View Post
    ...having your weight back over the rear wheel makes it easier to lift the front end right? Thus making it easier to steer quickly by lifting the front end and moving it to where you want...
    Although I don't fully agree with BikeShopMonkey, I can't say I agree with this statement either. Maybe I'm missing what you are trying to say, but I don't think I've ever steered this way. I do lift the front to get it over or around in tight technical situations, but when simply riding singletrack, I mostly counter steer. And the only time my ass is over the rear wheel is when the pucker factor is high and I'm pointing it downhill.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  58. #658
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    4,211
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    look how funny you look all trying to rationalize your wrongness.


    sure leaning back with your butt behind the tire is going to make an effect on the bike. who rides like that? a poorly designed bike? yes! change your riding style to make up for bad design?

    sure i said there are a few 29ers out there that have this kind of "slack" design. doesn't make them any good. right!

    sure there are 26" downhill(and "all mountain") bikes with slack designs. so people can feel stable at speed, the steering was slowed down. i got no problem riding my steeper 29ers at speed over any terrain.

    normal head tube angles are not twitchy unless they approach track bike angles. even then there is no way to get a chainstay that short due to larger tires we ride.


    don't need a lecture on whats out there as i am riding a kona unit until my waltworks gets ordered and built up. the kona suffers from the same design flaw as the canfield, just not as heavy, way cheaper, better built, available years ago and nicer looking.


    go ahead keep arguing your useless point, you either work for them or are embarrassed that you spent soo much money on this frame ya gotta defend it now.
    Bikeshopmonkey, it's perfectly acceptable to not like how a bike rides without losing your mind. Oh, and it's perfectly acceptable for other people to disagree with you without losing your mind. And, and, and...it's perfectly acceptable to communicate on the interwebs without losing your mind.

  59. #659
    WNC Native
    Reputation: nitrousjunky's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    3,292
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    most bikes with 70 degrees or slacker are:

    downhill bikes
    chopper bikes
    beach cruisers
    and a select few of new short chainstay 29ers.
    Yep, Trek/GF Superfly ( and all their XC HTs) and Scott HTs are downhill bikes aren't they.

    Obviously you prefer a standard XC geometry bike, congratulations there are plenty of them made. You tried it and didn't like it, now move along.
    "I ride to clear my head, my head is clearer when I'm riding SS. Therefore, I choose to ride SS."~ Fullrange Drew

  60. #660
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Just neg rep and put him in your ignore list. Obviously a troll.

  61. #661
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post
    people gotta know that this frame is flawed.....
    don't think the frame is flawed maybe...........
    But anyway, since there is sooooo much love for the Nimble 9, I will be putting it up for sale soon here and other places.
    Just thought I would put this in real quick for anyone intrested, looking for 1,500.00 complete set up as a 1x9 now w/ the older XT stuff but not the super old stuff LOL and an MRP mini G2 sl BB mount chain guide.
    PM me if anyone intrested in a Large Black

  62. #662
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,411
    Quote Originally Posted by BikeShopMonkey View Post

    normal head tube angles are not twitchy unless they approach track bike angles. even then there is no way to get a chainstay that short due to larger tires we ride.


    don't need a lecture on whats out there as i am riding a kona unit until my waltworks gets ordered and built up. the kona suffers from the same design flaw as the canfield, just not as heavy, way cheaper, better built, available years ago and nicer looking.
    It's been proven that one can have really short stays and fat tires. Do some research.

    How is the Unit anything like the Nimble?

    And if anybody understands the good that has been designed into the Nimble9, it is Walt of Waltworks. That guy is a genius, he has built many cool bikes, and some even have the properties that you seem to despise.

  63. #663
    Professional Crastinator
    Reputation: Fleas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    4,613
    Quote Originally Posted by MMcG View Post
    Does anyone know the trail figure for a Nimble 9 with a 120mm fork up front on it?
    With the Zombie 500 rigid fork (500 ATC, 45mm OS), which I think is a pretty close susp. correction for a sagged 120mm fork, and an Ardent 2.4 the HA = 69.5 deg. and the trail is around 86mm (+/- for bigger/smaller tire) per my CAD drawing. This is based on an axle height of 14.33" (cycle computer circumference of 2289mm).

    I think an MCR9 with the old 490mm Niner fork is about 76mm, so the N9 should be a little slower steering. Slower steering would be somewhat obvious, I think, just looking at the geo. chart, but it's nice to be able to put a number on it for reference.

    I think the N9 picks up where the MCR leaves off as far as descending and navigating tricky tech. The rearward weight bias helps float the front wheel and gives you a confident position from which to descend really steep angles, and it makes manuals that much easier. Still, I haven't tried a serious granny gear climb on anything really steep, though. That will be the final test to see if it displaces the MCR, which has been taking a pounding that I doubt was within its design parameters as an XC race bike. On "normal" climbs the N9 does not wander at all.

    Riding the N9 at Ray's MTB I noticed the front wheel is more "out there", but it required less body English on rocks and stunts since the weight bias is already back.
    Slow drops are easier.
    The corkscrew climb was harder, but I cleaned it and I think I will benefit from a 100mm stem instead of the 90mm that I have on there.
    Jumps were easier - I'm still not very good, but I felt less uncomfortable and had better control of where to place the rear tire when I landed.
    For the first time I am using a w-i-d-e handlebar. You would think that the combo of slack steering geo and 30" bars would make it steer like a ship, but even compared to the MCR9 I can't call it slow-steering. On center it is very relaxed, but it turns in nicely and it feels like it will carve comfortably on a washboard at ludicrous speed. I can't wait for it see real dirt.

    That's all for now until I complete the steep climb granny gear test.

    -F

  64. #664
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MMcG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    9,606
    Thanks Fleas!

  65. #665
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    695
    Changing the subject.....

    Can someone measure the distance from the bottom of the BB shell to the ground on their N9?

    I want to run a Niner carbon fork so I would imagine 80mm or 100mm forks would be closest.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by racefit; 01-20-2012 at 12:36 PM.

  66. #666
    hispanic mechanic
    Reputation: sslos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,494
    Mine is 11.75", IIRC.
    That's with a 100mm Fox.

    Los
    Whiskey is my yoga.

    dongerparty.com

  67. #667
    bottom dweller
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    90

    Fixed your statement for ya

    "doesn't make sense TO ME to create a frame with the possibility of nimble quick handling and then slow it down with a slack head angle."

    It seems to make sense to lots of other folks, on lots of other bikes. (not just the N9)

    Doesn't work for you, we get it.

    Ride what you like, and let others do so as well.
    "What's the use of a fine house if you haven't got a tolerable planet to put it on?" ~Thoreau

  68. #668
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,411
    Quote Originally Posted by Fleas View Post
    I can't call it slow-steering. On center it is very relaxed, but it turns in nicely and it feels like it will carve comfortably on a washboard at ludicrous speed. I can't wait for it see real dirt.
    The N9 does carve nicely. Just push your feet into the curve, and around you go.

    Quote Originally Posted by racefit View Post
    Changing the subject.....

    Can someone measure the distance from the bottom of the BB shell to the ground on their N9?

    I want to run a Niner carbon fork so I would imagine 80mm or 100mm forks would be closest.

    Thanks!
    I have a Niner on my bike. I'll see if I can get a measurement for you when I get home tonight.

  69. #669
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    695
    Thanks! Sent you a PM as well.

  70. #670
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,411
    My bb height is just over 12" with a Niner fork and Bonty FR3's. This seems a little off to me. I'll try to get an exact measurement this weekend.

    Didn't get your pm though.

  71. #671
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    695
    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    My bb height is just over 12" with a Niner fork and Bonty FR3's. This seems a little off to me. I'll try to get an exact measurement this weekend.

    Didn't get your pm though.
    What size frame do you have?

    Is that to bottom of BB shell or center of BB?

    Will check on the PM
    Last edited by racefit; 01-21-2012 at 04:42 PM.

  72. #672
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Medium frame, 100mm Reba, Ardent 2.25 F and Racing Ralph 2.25 R. BB height is 12.25". (To the bottom of the shell is 11.375)

  73. #673
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    7
    Awesome bike! Happy trails.

  74. #674
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by twinracer View Post
    how many spacers are there?
    2 of the standard spacers that came with the xtr bb. I want to say they are 2.5mm, but I never checked to be honest.

  75. #675
    All That is Man
    Reputation: Zero Signal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    334
    Quote Originally Posted by eurospek View Post
    Ever heard of a hydration pack? One can easily carry more water than in 3 water bottles. Plus with the smaller size frames, water bottle bosses interfere with dropping the seat for the descents.
    Yep. At a liter per hour, I can only carry 5-6 hours of water on my back (two 3L bladders or one 3L bladders and 2 bottles). Each water bottle on the bike affords me another hour on the trail, so more cages = longer rides. It also gets weight off by back for shorter rides or non-technical rides where I don't mind weight on the bike. And for races, my food/electrolytes are in separate bottles. Better to have them on the bike so I can consume while on the move.
    John

  76. #676
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    177
    Quote Originally Posted by racefit View Post
    Changing the subject.....

    Can someone measure the distance from the bottom of the BB shell to the ground on their N9?

    I want to run a Niner carbon fork so I would imagine 80mm or 100mm forks would be closest.

    Thanks!
    I have a Maxle Reba with ghetto travel spacers and exactly 4" of stanchion showing above the wipers - Rockshox would call it around 90mm of travel (because at "100 mm travel" you have about 110 mm of stanchion showing). Axle to crown measures about 19.75" or 502mm. For tires it's got Ardent 2.25's on Flow rims (tire height is a hair under 29"). BB height is right at 12" which is just what the geometry chart states for a 500mm fork.

  77. #677
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,411
    Updated bb specs. Medium frame, Bonty FR3's, Niner fork = 10.75" from ground to bottom of bb.

  78. #678
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Just FYI, found another rigid fork option: Raleigh XXIX. (I think I've got a 2011 version). A/C is 490mm. The thing's a porker, though. 3.25 lbs. I see Soul Cycles has their 485mm forks in stock now...

  79. #679
    29 TO LIFE
    Reputation: bzo75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    153
    If you can find one in stock the Vodoo zombie 500 fork is 500mm hense the name. It might be on my next frame if I cam make up my mind if I want a Nimble 9 or Jones steel space frame. It is the longest non custom fork I have seen but I read on the Bronto bikes website they will make a segmented 120mm suspension corrected fork.

  80. #680
    banned
    Reputation: Mojo Troll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,095

    used

    Why so many Nimbles and Yellis for sale used? Seeing how its a frame manufactured in small amounts. There sure are alot of them for sale on the used market.

    (lots of props on this very thread from riders thanking other riders for selling them a used frame as well)

  81. #681
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,830
    Quote Originally Posted by Mojo Troll View Post
    Why so many Nimbles and Yellis for sale used? Seeing how its a frame manufactured in small amounts. There sure are alot of them for sale on the used market.

    (lots of props on this very thread from riders thanking other riders for selling them a used frame as well)
    Reasons I seen in posted ads are
    (1) bought on impulse and then change mind (buyers remorse) or CFO (wife) makes them change mind.
    (2) financial changes, loss of job, divorce, illness, etc.
    Last edited by slocaus; 01-28-2012 at 11:36 AM. Reason: clarify
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  82. #682
    hispanic mechanic
    Reputation: sslos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,494
    To add to slocaus' reasons, the geometry for these frames is different enough that they may not work for a lot of people.
    I'm using my N9 for a decidedly non- AM function (endurance racing,) and it's the bee' knees. For me.
    Not everyone's gonna like it, but that's just because they're idiots. I kid, I kid!

    Los
    Whiskey is my yoga.

    dongerparty.com

  83. #683
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldHouseMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,690
    Quote Originally Posted by Mojo Troll View Post
    Why so many Nimbles and Yellis for sale used? Seeing how its a frame manufactured in small amounts. There sure are alot of them for sale on the used market.

    (lots of props on this very thread from riders thanking other riders for selling them a used frame as well)
    I just did a quick search and there doesn't seem to be a lot of Yelli Screamy or Nimble9 frames in the used market right now. Currently on MTBR there are 2 YS and 1 Nimble9 for sale. Ebay currently has zero of either frame for sale and a quick search of completed listings for both frames finds one of each that did not sell.
    I only ride bikes to fill the time when I'm not skiing.

  84. #684
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    177
    Quote Originally Posted by Mojo Troll View Post
    Why so many Nimbles and Yellis for sale used? Seeing how its a frame manufactured in small amounts. There sure are alot of them for sale on the used market.

    (lots of props on this very thread from riders thanking other riders for selling them a used frame as well)
    I got mine used from someone who basically said the large wasn't big enough for them, that in order to get enough reach, their seattube angle became too steep for them, and they were going to get a custom bike.

    I personally buy and sell 1-2 frames a year average lately. And I only have 2 real mountain bikes so - part of the explanation might be that those posting here are tinkerers and like trying new things moreso than the average rider?

  85. #685
    transmitter~receiver
    Reputation: meltingfeather's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    9,180
    Quote Originally Posted by Mojo Troll View Post
    Why so many Nimbles and Yellis for sale used? Seeing how its a frame manufactured in small amounts. There sure are alot of them for sale on the used market.

    (lots of props on this very thread from riders thanking other riders for selling them a used frame as well)
    if what you are saying is true, the obvious answer is that the people who bought them don't like them.
    Quote Originally Posted by pvd
    Time to stop believing the hype and start doing some science.
    29er Tire Weight Database

  86. #686
    !snotrocket!
    Reputation: rottendan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    228
    thought this was the nimble build thread.... the interweb is a funny place
    coastin' along

  87. #687
    banned
    Reputation: Mojo Troll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,095

    touchy group

    WOW what a bunch of butt hurt people on this thread. Make a simple comment about seeing several used frames for sale over the past couple of months and the neg rep flies.

    Theres been used Nimbles and Yellis for sale used right here on MTBRs classifieds, as well, as E Bay weekly since thier release. Thats simply my observation. Seeing how the frames are manufactured in smaller batches. I would say thats a somewhat high percentage of new frames headed to the used market in a short period of time since being released.

    As I said in my original post. Even some of the people posting on this very thread are giving props to fellow MTBR users for selling them a used frame.

    Again this is my simple observation. I appologize to the tools that neg repped me for not saving every single Canfield used bike add over the past six months.So, I could post it on here.

    If your so bent on this frame. Go hang out in the Canfield forum. Were you can stroke the egos, of fellow like minded individuals such as yourself. This is the 29er forum, where not everyone is a fan boi.

  88. #688
    What day are we riding?
    Reputation: Rockin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,088
    Quote Originally Posted by Mojo Troll View Post
    If your so bent on this frame. Go hang out in the Canfield forum. Were you can stroke the egos, of fellow like minded individuals such as yourself. This is the 29er forum, where not everyone is a fan boi.
    Never understood why people get out of shape over preferences. Not everyone is going to like the same things you do. This is not a reason to get all hot and bothered.

    With that, if we took the approach that is mentioned there probably wouldn't be any discussions left in the 29er forum.

  89. #689
    trail rat
    Reputation: slocaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,830
    Quote Originally Posted by Mojo Troll View Post
    WOW what a bunch of butt hurt people on this thread. Make a simple comment about seeing several used frames for sale over the past couple of months and the neg rep flies.

    Theres been used Nimbles and Yellis for sale used right here on MTBRs classifieds, as well, as E Bay weekly since thier release. Thats simply my observation. Seeing how the frames are manufactured in smaller batches. I would say thats a somewhat high percentage of new frames headed to the used market in a short period of time since being released.

    As I said in my original post. Even some of the people posting on this very thread are giving props to fellow MTBR users for selling them a used frame.

    Again this is my simple observation. I appologize to the tools that neg repped me for not saving every single Canfield used bike add over the past six months.So, I could post it on here.

    If your so bent on this frame. Go hang out in the Canfield forum. Were you can stroke the egos, of fellow like minded individuals such as yourself. This is the 29er forum, where not everyone is a fan boi.
    Funny you mentioned butt hurt. Nice rant, but you lost your cool.
    "The physician heals, Nature makes well" - real fortune cookie

    CCCMB trail work for trail access - SLO, CA

  90. #690
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by slocaus View Post
    Funny you mentioned butt hurt. Nice rant, but you lost your cool.
    Zing!!

    Still loving my N9. It's not for everyone. Read the reviews before buying, as there have been lots of helpful posts. Don't just drink the koolaid. I was fortunate enough to demo one properly before buying, which solidified my decision. It's a great AM-ishXC bike and I wouldn't change a thing on it. Maybe except swing drops instead of sliders (no problems, but I just prefer swings).

  91. #691
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    229
    Quote Originally Posted by Mojo Troll View Post
    WOW what a bunch of butt hurt people on this thread. Make a simple comment about seeing several used frames for sale over the past couple of months and the neg rep flies.

    Theres been used Nimbles and Yellis for sale used right here on MTBRs classifieds, as well, as E Bay weekly since thier release. Thats simply my observation. Seeing how the frames are manufactured in smaller batches. I would say thats a somewhat high percentage of new frames headed to the used market in a short period of time since being released.

    As I said in my original post. Even some of the people posting on this very thread are giving props to fellow MTBR users for selling them a used frame.

    Again this is my simple observation. I appologize to the tools that neg repped me for not saving every single Canfield used bike add over the past six months.So, I could post it on here.

    If your so bent on this frame. Go hang out in the Canfield forum. Were you can stroke the egos, of fellow like minded individuals such as yourself. This is the 29er forum, where not everyone is a fan boi.
    well as oldhouseman pointed out, your "observations" are inaccurate. And BTW- I sold mine, unfortunately, due to a divorce. I loved the frame, but have to limit myself to only one bike right now. And now I will go give you a positive rep so YOUR little feelings aren't hurt. Your welcome.

  92. #692
    hispanic mechanic
    Reputation: sslos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,494

    Canfield Nimble 9 review

    This will be posted in the reviews, whenever the issues they're having get ironed out. Hope it's enjoyable!

    Strengths: Versatility, great ride quality, fit and finish.
    Short-stay/ slack HT geometry works well- for me.

    Weaknesses: Wide BB required, but that's niggling.

    29" bikes owned: Kona Unit, Gary Fisher Rig, Wily custom, Raleigh XXIX, Surly Karate Monkey

    Demoed: Pretty much everything Fisher/Trek has put out in the last 15 years, ditto Specialized, odds and ends at Dirt Demo, etc.

    Set-up: Fox F29 (100mm), King HS and Hubs, Bontrager Duster rims, XT M760 cranks and BB, XT 775/755 hybrid brakes. Single speed.

    I wanted to follow up my initial review now that I have 6 months and some brutal miles on this frame.
    This bike does a lot of things really well, and it's incredibly versatile in its possible configurations. It can be built as a single speed, like mine. Or with a full complement of gears using a direct-mount front derailleur. Or how about a 1x, with a chain guide mounted there? Sure, why not? XC, AM, enduro... you name it.
    The frame is burly enough to handle some rough-and-tumble, but not so heavy it precludes it's use as a XC bike. Some riders, especially those who ride geared, and climb in a fairly low gear while seated might have some issues with the front lifting due to the short rear end. Those looking for a full-blown AM/ FR hardtail, be aware that the headtube is 1 1/8". A lot of longer travel forks, which are using a tapered steerer more and more, are out.
    While I have it set up somewhere between XC and AM light- it's actually my endurance racing all-'rounder. This is my only "regular" mountain bike- I have a Pugsley, but they're completely different, and I don't ride the Pugsley much. I ride single speed, so I haven't tried this frame with gears, so please take that into consideration. The frame is designed to use forks with travel between 80-120mm, and I have mine set right in the middle at 100mm.
    The Nimble 9 has therefore been seeing all of my off-road miles, and a lot of commuting/ ride-to-the-trail miles too.
    I was a bit skeptical about the "AM" geometry- super short chainstays and slack headtube angle- for long distances, but I figured that I was willing to give it a shot, since I wasn't getting rid of my Kona right away.
    As I alluded to in my initial review, I was impressed by the handling right away. However, I still had trepidation until I had an opportunity to really get some distance under the bike.
    Two weeks ago, I competed in the El Paso Puzzler 50 ( 2012 Race Course ) a race known for tough climbs, technical trails, and unrelenting rocks. While the engine faltered at times, the Canfield never wavered. Steep, loose climbs tested the limits of traction, but the tire placement afforded by the short stays kept the knobs digging.
    The descents on this course were no place to rest. One in particular went down the remnants of a rockslide; head- to basketball-sized rocks, rolling out from under your tires; steep pitches; exhaustion from just having climbed up the biggest climb of the day. The Canfield held a line so well that little effort was wasted on sheer terror.
    Towards the end of the race, the organizers sent us through a technical granite rock garden. 3-4' drops and ups, with little rest in between. This frame gave confidence in spades! No question that the Nimble 9 lives up to its name.
    The main concern I had when I bought the Nimble 9 was whether having the rear wheel so tucked in would be comfortable. While I can't say I've noticed an increase in shock transmitted up the seatstays, the ability to run a 2.4" tire for this race definitely helped!
    I'll be honest- I'm really thrilled by this bike, and can say without hesitation that it's the best handling, most confidence-inspiring single speed I've ever ridden. When you add in the price tag, it's downright amazing.

    Los
    Last edited by sslos; 01-31-2012 at 01:46 PM. Reason: More complete review.
    Whiskey is my yoga.

    dongerparty.com

  93. #693
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,015
    Can you run a front derailleur, even with the rear wheel shoved all the way forward in the dropouts?
    undefined Absolutely must have: Black Machine Tech Zeroflex brake levers (the ones with the rotating leverage adjuster)

  94. #694
    AOK
    AOK is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: AOK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,903
    Quote Originally Posted by uphiller View Post
    Can you run a front derailleur, even with the rear wheel shoved all the way forward in the dropouts?
    I had to push the drops back about 3-5mm from full forward to clear my FD. So you can come close, but probably not all the way forward.

    Using a SRAM XO 2x10 FD, FWIW.

  95. #695
    Gigantic Hawk
    Reputation: dubthang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,411
    Nice write up, sslos.

  96. #696
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,015
    Quote Originally Posted by AOK View Post
    I had to push the drops back about 3-5mm from full forward to clear my FD. So you can come close, but probably not all the way forward.

    Using a SRAM XO 2x10 FD, FWIW.
    Thanks for the info. In your opinion, would clearance be better if there were an 83mm instead of a 73mm bb shell? Just wondering, for the sake of building a custom frame.
    undefined Absolutely must have: Black Machine Tech Zeroflex brake levers (the ones with the rotating leverage adjuster)

  97. #697
    !snotrocket!
    Reputation: rottendan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    228
    Quote Originally Posted by uphiller View Post
    Can you run a front derailleur, even with the rear wheel shoved all the way forward in the dropouts?
    here are some pics of mine running a 2 x10 shimano xt and 2.4 ralphs. I have the sliders pushed all the way back and there is a solid 25mm of room. I'd say you could get real close to the full forward position but, you'd have no room for debris clearance. sslos that puzzler course looks insane... nice job ss it!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Canfield Nimble 9 build thread!-img_1421.jpg  

    Canfield Nimble 9 build thread!-img_1419.jpg  

    coastin' along

  98. #698
    hispanic mechanic
    Reputation: sslos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,494
    Quote Originally Posted by dubthang View Post
    Nice write up, sslos.
    Thanks, man. I appreciate that!

    Los
    Whiskey is my yoga.

    dongerparty.com

  99. #699
    hispanic mechanic
    Reputation: sslos's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,494
    Here's a current pic.
    With the fork set at 100mm and using a 2.4 Ardent front/ Bontrager FR-3 rear, the BB height is 12.75" center, 11.5" to the bottom of the shell.

    Los
    Last edited by sslos; 01-31-2012 at 02:15 PM.
    Whiskey is my yoga.

    dongerparty.com

  100. #700
    .......
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by sslos View Post
    Here's a current pic.
    With the fork set at 100mm and using an FR3 front/ 2.4 Ardent rear, the BB height is 12.75" center, 11.5" to the bottom of the shell.

    Los
    Looks good. Though I think you're using Ardent front and FR3 rear.

Page 7 of 21 FirstFirst ... 3456789101117 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Jones steel diamond frame or Canfield Nimble 9
    By Clink in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 11-02-2012, 10:27 PM
  2. Canfield Nimble 9?
    By Professor in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 254
    Last Post: 09-23-2011, 08:17 AM
  3. Canfield One - building thread
    By jetmotor in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 70
    Last Post: 06-23-2010, 08:33 PM
  4. Canfield Bros Nimble Nine
    By Fly Rider in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-24-2010, 07:39 AM
  5. Canfield Nimble 9 29'er, get your pedal on!
    By pajak in forum Canfield
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-17-2009, 06:10 PM

Members who have read this thread: 80

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •