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  1. #1
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    BOB (or other) trailers on a Niner?

    My recent MTB outings have me yearning to do some backcountry exploration and I'm thinking some overnight or longer trips will be in order. I'm considering a BOB Ibex trailer (the one w/ suspension). I'm wondering if people have experience with them, especially with a HT 29er? Is the suspension worth the extra $? Are there other options that work well for less $?

    Any info on using these types of trailers with 29ers would help me.

  2. #2
    You know, for kids
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    Used a B.O.B. on a Redline Mono-9 for a while, mainly for carrying tools in/out of the trails for workdays.

    I say suspension isn't necessary unless you have a fragile load. As long as the load is secure the trailer will follow with no mishaps. I've never run one with suspension so I can't comment on that but I've never had any issues with the trailer following just fine on most trails and around town.
    disclaimer: I sell and repair bicycles

  3. #3
    Over the Hill
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    I use a non suspension Bob Trailer on my One-9 all the time. I have followed other Bob Trailers down hill on trail work days and the suspension Bobs seem to bounce just as high in the air than the non-suspension Bobs on tech trails.

    If you plan on a Bob to camp and have tech climbs it helps if someone helps you get the trailer up and over some stuff.

    Be sure when you get a Bob that the reach is long enough for 29 inch wheels.

    Dean

  4. #4
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    ive used the suspension one on technical singletrack behind a 26" HT and it was great upto about 30 lbs. after that the shock bottoms out and you loose ground clearance.

  5. #5
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    Thanks guys, that's pretty helpful. It sounds like the extra $ and complexity of the suspension aren't needed for the most part - hey, just like on my bike!

    That'll save me some dough.

    Oh, and they have them now that are meant to work with the big wheels. I just have to make sure I order the right one or if I get one that's used that it is the right one.

  6. #6
    is buachail foighneach me
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    I want one of those Polish ones. ExtraWheel I think the company is......... Yep, Extrawheel. http://www.extrawheel.com/en/4/

  7. #7
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    I like that the extrawheel gives you a spare front wheel or that you can just get the frame and build your own wheel. It's pretty pricey though at $345 euros ($520 per google conversion) for the top end one.

  8. #8
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    I've an Extrawheel, a Voyager Solo. Before I assembled the trailer, I weighed the components.

    Frame .....1.52 Kg
    Calliper .... 0.685 Kg
    Mudguard (including the stays, bolts, washers & spacers) 0.312 Kg
    Flag & mast .. 0.060 Kg

    Carrying capacity is 30-35 Kg.

    The wheel setup (my choice),
    Shimano quick release ..... 0.058 Kg
    WTB Laser Disk XC wheel ..0.806 Kg
    Maxxis Flyweight inner ......0.092 Kg
    Maxxis Larson TT UST tyre 0.702 Kg

    The extra long quick release (with the ball nuts) for the bike's rear axle ... is a negligible weight within the system.

    Total weight of the complete Extrawheel set-up, including the wheel is, as the manufacturer says, "the World's lightest trailer" and when stripped down (without the mudguard setup) can carry about 7X its own weight.

    The calliper that attaches the trailer is extraordinary. The calliper works as a shock absorber and a sway-bar and is beautifully made and finished. The frame has two ball-sleeves for the calliper couplings and again the finish is impressive.

    The way the load is carried by the Extrawheel is employing basic physics to an unassailable level. If you stretch out one of your arms, keeping it horizontal to the ground, and place your other hand just forward of your shoulder muscles and then push down hard, your outstretched arm barely moves and handles the weight comfortably. Like the positioning of the load on the Extrawheel just forward of the axel.

    If you then place your other hand on your out-stretched arm, on your elbow crease and then push down, just as hard, ... that is now like a Bob trailer.

    Also, having the Extrawheel the same diameter as the bike's wheels, means that all three wheels are in harmony.

    Warren.
    Last edited by Wild Wassa; 01-08-2011 at 04:40 PM.

  9. #9
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    Based on the thread title I thought you meant "on a Niner" brand 29er.

    They said they weren't too sure about using one on the MCR/SIR frames.

    Sorry I do not have a definitive answer for you.* The m.c.r. 9 was built to be a light weight trail bike using the best steel tubing.* It was not designed with touring in mind.* If you are just using your BOB trailer for light fireroad riding to a camp site and then doing some exploring I'm sure you will be fine, doing this 2-3 times a year.* If you are planning many multi-day trips or some epic to criss cross the Continental Divide a burlier frame would be suggested.* You will have to use some common sense in your decision.*

    You will have to think of the m.c.r. 9 as a Ferrari.* You can put a trailer hitch on a Ferrari and tow stuff with it but it was not designed with that in mind.* One of the reasons we did not put rack mounts or extra water bottle mounts on the frame.* I hope this helps.


    Chris Sugai

    Niner Bikes
    13122 Saticoy Street
    North Hollywood, CA *91605

    Phone: 877-646-3792
    Fax: 818-579-7107
    I have, however, used one (BOB) for short tool and luggage trips and such and the rear triangle seems stable enough.

    -F

  10. #10
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    I have used a bob in the past. Racks and panniers in my not so humble opinion are a better bet, plus lighter and less complex.
    Check out bikepacking.net for more info on setups.
    My brain went from "you probably shouldn't say that" to WTF!

  11. #11
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    Here is my MCR with the Ibex on a week long trip on the KATY Trail last summer. Could not tell it was back there unless going up hill. Didn't need the suspension for the smooth gravel trail, but could see where it could possibly save some wear and tear on rougher trails. I think I will be using Old Man Mountain racks for the GDMBR vs. the BOB.

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  12. #12
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    The bike is a 26". A 29" calliper/fork is available for the Extrawheel Voyager Solo.

    I was hoping to get out in the bush and take some shots of the trailer stripped down to its bare-bones this weekend which didn't happen. When touring the mudguard and flag go. There is no point having the flag and mudguard off road. I don't normally ride in traffic.











    Warren.
    Last edited by Wild Wassa; 01-08-2011 at 05:24 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MidSouth
    Here is my MCR with the Ibex on a week long trip on the KATY Trail last summer. Could not tell it was back there unless going up hill. Didn't need the suspension for the smooth gravel trail, but could see where it could possibly save some wear and tear on rougher trails. I think I will be using Old Man Mountain racks for the GDMBR vs. the BOB.

    Name:  KATY Trail 156comp.jpg
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    Can you please post a pic of the loaded trailer?

    Thanks,
    -F

  14. #14
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    Here is one, not a good closeup of the trailer and load though...

    BOB (or other) trailers on a Niner?-katy-trail-003compressed.jpg

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MidSouth
    Here is one, not a good closeup of the trailer and load though...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    That's great! Looks like a lot of fun.
    Thanks,
    -F

  16. #16
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    In all actuality I believe my wife had an easier time than I did, she was using Lone Peak panniers. Granted I had much more weight on the BOB. We did have to make some detours off trail because of the Missouri River flooding last summer and had some really large hills to get up and around some of the bluff areas in 98 degree weather. I did some ot the same sections of the trail this fall with the Old Man Mountain Sherpa rear rack with Lone Peak panniers and used 32c touring tires instead of the 2" Bontragers and the going was considerably easier, but we didn't take camping gear either, we did the motel thing on the last triip.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by richwolf View Post
    I have used a bob in the past. Racks and panniers in my not so humble opinion are a better bet, plus lighter and less complex.
    Check out bikepacking.net for more info on setups.
    The number of great frame packs available out there now definitely allow for lighter and better handling set-ups that are less likely to get snagged on single track than a rear pannier.

    However if you are doing fall camping with more robust amount of gear a BOB works great. If you are doing a mix of back country and hotels, or traveling by air the BOB is a pain.

    I have both fixed and suspension trailer BOB's. Used a "hardtail" trailer for a two week tour in 2000. They both work well but the suspension definitely does not get launched as bad so handles better. Long term the frame does better too since the suspension takes the hit instead of the frame.

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