Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    13

    BM Flyer Race Machine?

    Has anyone used a Bm flyer for doing 24hr or endurance racing. If so what was the set up and how comfortable is the bike over longer distances

  2. #2
    pepito
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    640
    i don't own one, and haven't ridden one either, but here's my impression: it's a big bmx bike. and it's not light. the only reason i would consider this bike over others would be for the potential fun factor. bombing around a city or dirt track on a big-wheeled bmx has some appeal. however, xc endurance events are entirely different. do yourself a favor and get a 29" bike that was built for mountain biking. you can't go wrong with a redline.

    the_dude
    "Melancholy is incompatible with bicycling" ~James E. Starrs

  3. #3
    giddy up!
    Reputation: donkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,239
    Quote Originally Posted by the_dude
    i don't own one, and haven't ridden one either, but here's my impression: it's a big bmx bike. and it's not light. the only reason i would consider this bike over others would be for the potential fun factor. bombing around a city or dirt track on a big-wheeled bmx has some appeal. however, xc endurance events are entirely different. do yourself a favor and get a 29" bike that was built for mountain biking. you can't go wrong with a redline.

    the_dude
    I second that.....

    B
    www.thepathbikeshop.com

  4. #4
    Blanco
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,291
    Unlike the previous posters, I actually have seen and ridden a BM Flyer, so I feel qualified to comment. (Yes, I own one.) All the following measurements are my own, not taken off a website, so they're honest.

    A 19" BM Flyer weighs the same as a Monocog 29: just under 28# bone stock.

    This includes a beefy DH riser bar and some stupid heavy (but indestructible) BMX cranks and BB. Replace those with more normal items and you'll save a lot of weight. Therefore I'm guessing the frame and fork are lighter than the Monocog, but I haven't stripped it to find out.

    Really it comes down to two questions:

    1) Which geometry fits you better? The BMF has a slacker seat tube (~71 degree effective vs. 73 for the RL), shorter ETT (~605 vs. 622), and longer chainstays (465 vs. 445). Both forks are suspension corrected to about 80mm, and HA is essentially the same. Keep in mind that the longer chainstays are balanced out by the slacker seat tube as far as weight distribution goes.

    2) Do you have any desire to ever run gears? If so, you definitely want the BMF, as you can convert it to 1x9 for about $50 in Nashbar parts. If you know you will always stay SS, the RL is a better setup (no chain tensioner, stock gearing doesn't immediately need to be changed).

    They're both cool trail bikes built by BMX companies...it just comes down to which one fits you better.

  5. #5
    giddy up!
    Reputation: donkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,239
    Quote Originally Posted by El Caballo
    Unlike the previous posters.
    Not soo fast....I've seen both incarnations of the BM flyer, in the flesh. I even rode one of them.

    It's definitely not a bike I'd want to spend 24 hours on....that's all.

    B
    www.thepathbikeshop.com

  6. #6
    Blanco
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,291
    Quote Originally Posted by donkey
    Not soo fast....I've seen both incarnations of the BM flyer, in the flesh. I even rode one of them.
    Point taken. I was reacting to the_dude's screed. Was it just the riding position, or was it something else you didn't like?

    I admit that I'm coming to agree with mikesee about slacker STAs...69 is too slack for me but 70.5-71 feels just right. 73-74 puts too much weight on my hands.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    13
    I was just wondering. I bought one on ebay last winter and rode it as a single speed. I am in the process of putting gears on it. I have changed out most of the parts on it to make it a litle more XC friendly . It is my first 29er and i like the way it roles. I have done a couple of 24hr and 100 k races on my FS. I was thinking about trying out the BMF for something different. I think I will put some longer rides in and see how it feels. Thanks for the imput.

  8. #8
    I like endos
    Reputation: ParkerFly's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    493

    Sorry to resurrect the dead, but

    I am considering building a geared BM Flyer for XC use. I don't have a lot of money and I was thinking of gearing a MC 29 but have decided that the cost/difficulty of doing so is somewhat prohibitive. The BM has a shorter TT than my RL SS, but I rode (comfortably) on a 20" Kona 26er before I got my Monocog that had a tt just a hair over 23in. and liked it very much. I have figured out that if I ebay/parts bin most of the parts, I could come out to about ~$600for the whole bike, using basically just the frame/wheelset/seatpost/headset from the BM Flyer. My build would look something like this:

    BM Flyer frame/wheels/headset/seatpost

    Parts from parts bin:

    WTB Speed V
    Bontrager Superstock 620 flat bar
    Cannondale 110x0 stem
    redline grips
    SRAM 9.0 levers
    LX rear der.
    EXi front tire
    Shimano m520 pedals
    shimano square taper BB

    Parts from Ebay:

    Shimano lx/deore 9 spd. cassette: $15
    Shimano hm53 chain: $10
    Fetish Cycles Al rigid fork: $135
    Avid SD5 v brakes: $15 used or new
    LX front der.: $15 used
    LX rapidfire shifters: $15 used
    Specialized Strongarm II square taper crankset: $40 or less

    It seems to me that this would end up a reasonably light, well spec'd, geared, rigid 29er for not much money at all, and since most of the gearies coming out on the market are ~$1000 and not spec'd particularly impressively for that money, and I have a ton of parts lying around, this would seem the most cost effective solution for me to get a cheap, light, rideable geared bike. I might even endurance race it, come to think of it. Trails in my area are mostly smooth, so no comments about the alum on alum combo. I know it will be harsh and I don't care. Other than that, if anyone has any ideas about how I could save even more money on gear parts, I'd love to hear them.
    As for the Pyramids, there is nothing to wonder at in them so much as the fact that so many men could be found degraded enough to spend their lives constructing a tomb for some ambitious booby, whom it would have been wiser and manlier to have drowned in the Nile, and then given his body to the dogs. - Henry David Thoreau

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    13

    Flyer has been raced

    I just completed the Ironcross Cyclocross race this past weekend in Gettysburg Pa on my BM flyer. the race was 62 miles comprised mostly of paved and gravel roads with some single track thrown in. I geared it and change over some of the parts to make it xc friendly. Although it may not have been the best choice for the race ( most of the bikes raced were true cyclo cross rigs) it over all performed well over the long haul. The one component I wish I would have put more thought in to would have been a lay back seat post. I wish I would have had more room in the cock pit for some of the longer road sections. Other than that it climbs great and is a snappy handler. I think it would excell on a more mountain bike friendly course. Overall I plan on doing more races on it and will continue to dial it in. Later

  10. #10
    Blanco
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,291
    Parker: The 110mm stem and flat bar will definitely give you an XC riding position. The headtube is pretty short, even on the 19" frame.

    Money-saving questions:
    1) Why replace a rigid Al fork with another rigid Al fork? There's nothing wrong with the stocker.
    2) I could see adding discs or swapping to Kool-Stop salmon pads, but the stock V-brakes themselves (Tektro) are fine.
    3) Nashbar has new square taper cranksets for $40.

    I say go for it. You'll have a great geared rigid bike for very little money.

  11. #11
    I like endos
    Reputation: ParkerFly's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    493
    Quote Originally Posted by El Caballo
    Parker: The 110mm stem and flat bar will definitely give you an XC riding position. The headtube is pretty short, even on the 19" frame.

    Money-saving questions:
    1) Why replace a rigid Al fork with another rigid Al fork? There's nothing wrong with the stocker.
    2) I could see adding discs or swapping to Kool-Stop salmon pads, but the stock V-brakes themselves (Tektro) are fine.
    3) Nashbar has new square taper cranksets for $40.

    I say go for it. You'll have a great geared rigid bike for very little money.
    I just think the fetish forks are badass. Unfortunately, Performance can no longer get these bikes. If anyone knows who can, let me know. I want to run full gears, so I'd need the '05 version.
    As for the Pyramids, there is nothing to wonder at in them so much as the fact that so many men could be found degraded enough to spend their lives constructing a tomb for some ambitious booby, whom it would have been wiser and manlier to have drowned in the Nile, and then given his body to the dogs. - Henry David Thoreau

  12. #12
    I like endos
    Reputation: ParkerFly's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    493

    Upon further consideration

    I will probably go with a KM fork (steel,yaay!) for cheaper and just swap the pads on the v brakes. All other mods will be similar.
    As for the Pyramids, there is nothing to wonder at in them so much as the fact that so many men could be found degraded enough to spend their lives constructing a tomb for some ambitious booby, whom it would have been wiser and manlier to have drowned in the Nile, and then given his body to the dogs. - Henry David Thoreau

  13. #13
    Blanco
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,291
    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerFly
    I will probably go with a KM fork (steel,yaay!) for cheaper and just swap the pads on the v brakes. All other mods will be similar.
    The KM fork is heavy and stiff as hell: I don't think you'll notice any difference unless you get something lightweight and expensive. For a budget build I'd get some cushy grips (Ourys or Fuels) and call it good.

  14. #14
    I like endos
    Reputation: ParkerFly's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    493

    Okay, the bottom line is I think

    Quote Originally Posted by El Caballo
    The KM fork is heavy and stiff as hell: I don't think you'll notice any difference unless you get something lightweight and expensive. For a budget build I'd get some cushy grips (Ourys or Fuels) and call it good.
    the stock fork is super ugly. There. I said it.
    As for the Pyramids, there is nothing to wonder at in them so much as the fact that so many men could be found degraded enough to spend their lives constructing a tomb for some ambitious booby, whom it would have been wiser and manlier to have drowned in the Nile, and then given his body to the dogs. - Henry David Thoreau

  15. #15
    Blanco
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,291
    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerFly
    the stock fork is super ugly. There. I said it.
    That's a perfectly good reason, and if you had just said that right off, I wouldn't have argued!

  16. #16
    I like endos
    Reputation: ParkerFly's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    493

    Since riding season is almost over here

    Quote Originally Posted by El Caballo
    That's a perfectly good reason, and if you had just said that right off, I wouldn't have argued!
    I may just get a project 2 fork and some discs this winter. We'll see. KM's can be had for pretty cheap on the bay though, and are disc and v compatible.
    As for the Pyramids, there is nothing to wonder at in them so much as the fact that so many men could be found degraded enough to spend their lives constructing a tomb for some ambitious booby, whom it would have been wiser and manlier to have drowned in the Nile, and then given his body to the dogs. - Henry David Thoreau

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •