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  1. #1
    I <3 NM
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    Best mechanic's stand & basic tool set for the beginner mechanic?

    I'm going start doing my own work, what home-mechanic-stand and basic toolset do you recommend?
    "Someone must have put alcohol in my beer last night." ~ Mr. Richard Baty, Esq.


  2. #2
    breathing helium
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    I can't be of any help as I am in the same boat. GOOD question! I need to do the same thing.

  3. #3
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    For a workstand I tried the Spin Doctor consumer stand from Performance - sucked. Then I got the Ultimate Consumer stand - awesome. Much more stable and strong. Blue Sky has it for $95: http://www.blueskycycling.com/view_product.php?pid=1342

    I already had an assortment of automotive wrenches, etc. so for bike specific tools I went shopping at PricePoint for their Sette branded tools (much cheaper than Park): http://www.pricepoint.com/thumb/2-Ac...Tools-True.htm
    I only buy tools I need because I don't like all those odd-ball tools that come in sets that are never used.

  4. #4
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    First tool I purchased back in the beginning was a good book... "Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance". A great place to start... complete with lists of tools required for beginner to advanced mechanics.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/193...lance&n=283155

  5. #5
    The Duuude, man...
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    I would get, to start:
    *decent stand
    *good set of allen tools ($15) - you can do 80% of basic stuff with that
    *cable cutters (you can install/trim/etc cables/housing with this - $14, also check hardware/home improvement stores)
    *basic pair of pliers ($6)
    *decent tire pump with built-in gauge ($40)
    *chain breaker
    *extra tubes
    *chain lube
    *small tub of grease
    *maaaybe a BB tool - standard for out-board bearings
    *cassette tool/chain whip

    Figure you could get all that for low 200's. I know it sounds like a lot when you just throw it out there like that, but it's a "good" investment...
    FS: Everything

  6. #6
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    I would add a set of precision screwdrivers

    Quote Originally Posted by ncj01
    I would get, to start:
    *decent stand
    *good set of allen tools ($15) - you can do 80% of basic stuff with that
    *cable cutters (you can install/trim/etc cables/housing with this - $14, also check hardware/home improvement stores)
    *basic pair of pliers ($6)
    *decent tire pump with built-in gauge ($40)
    *chain breaker
    *extra tubes
    *chain lube
    *small tub of grease
    *maaaybe a BB tool - standard for out-board bearings
    *cassette tool/chain whip

    Figure you could get all that for low 200's. I know it sounds like a lot when you just throw it out there like that, but it's a "good" investment...
    and I would say get the park chain whip with the built in pedal wrench, and I would also get a 13,15,17mm cone wrenches.
    As for the Pyramids, there is nothing to wonder at in them so much as the fact that so many men could be found degraded enough to spend their lives constructing a tomb for some ambitious booby, whom it would have been wiser and manlier to have drowned in the Nile, and then given his body to the dogs. - Henry David Thoreau

  7. #7
    jd3
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    If you go for one of those pre-made tool kits, you will have some tools that you may never use. ncj01's reply is all you need to start. You may add tools later as required.

  8. #8
    wg
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    The spind doctor tool set from Perfomance isnt't too bad. Its a good set of most tools for the price. As you discover the need for better tools you can swap in the Park etc.
    Don't harsh my mello

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dumbaSS
    First tool I purchased back in the beginning was a good book... "Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance". A great place to start... complete with lists of tools required for beginner to advanced mechanics.
    ]
    The Zinn MTB book was the first "tool" I bought as well and has been a great help. I even bought the Roadie version too.

    As for the real question I can't be real helpful at all. I got lucky and bought a Park pro stand and a bunch of tools when a Bike store went under for dirt cheap. All the other true bike tools I have bought have been Park tools. You might consider one of the small package tool groups from Park, Performance/Nashbar, or Pricepoint. You can somtimes find them cheaper on Ebay. They include the basic items you would need for maintaince or a frame up build. Small Sette Tool Kit Medium Sette Tool Kit Big Sette Tool Kit

    I started working on my bikes because I figure instead of paying the LBS to do work I can buy the tools and do it myself. I didn't know anything at first and have since built two 29ers from the frame up, a road fixie, and now fix up old roadies for extra cash.

  10. #10
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    For a workstand, go for the ultimate stand. It's just much better than what Park offers. This, however is the only place where Park has dropped the ball. For general bike tools, go for park and pedro tools, both are excellent quality and good prices. For more information, this topic has been beat to death (several times) over in the tooltime forum. Do a search or just browse through, you'll find a ton. Also, probably one of the best internet sites is the park site. They have great tutorials on how to work on different areas of your bike as well as tool lists for the beginner, intermediate, etc mechanic.

    http://www.parktool.com/

    Congrats, you're on your way to saving a bunch of time and money by doing repairs yourself. Oh yeah, don't go with cheap tools (like spin doctor), just go with Park because they'll last you a lifetime. I run a high school mountain bike team and I use my tools on a daily basis for the past 8 years and have yet to retire any of my park tools. I have had to replace several tools from lesser companies though. Consider it an investment. Just get the main tools you'll need, and then go for the $$ items (like the DAG gauge) when you find that you need it.

    Chris

  11. #11
    The Duuude, man...
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctxcrossx
    They have great tutorials on how to work on different areas of your bike as well as tool lists for the beginner, intermediate, etc mechanic.

    http://www.parktool.com/


    Congrats, you're on your way to saving a bunch of time and money by doing repairs yourself. Oh yeah, don't go with cheap tools (like spin doctor), just go with Park because they'll last you a lifetime. I run a high school mountain bike team and I use my tools on a daily basis for the past 8 years and have yet to retire any of my park tools.

    Consider it an investment. Just get the main tools you'll need, and then go for the $$ items (like the DAG gauge) when you find that you need it.

    Chris
    Love it, good advice. I did the same...I didn't get a HS cup remover and HS press until last fall...I'm lovin' it!!
    FS: Everything

  12. #12
    willtsmith_nwi
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    Don't diss Sette/Pyramid/ whoever makes those things ...

    Quote Originally Posted by ParkerFly
    and I would say get the park chain whip with the built in pedal wrench, and I would also get a 13,15,17mm cone wrenches.
    I would urge people not to diss those plastic packs with all the tools packed in. You can get them under the Sette/Pyramid ... whatever name (mine is labeled LIFU). I really like the fact that those tools are geared to plug into standard socket wrenches available at sears. The casette tool is 200% easier to use than a park equivalent. You do not have to carefully place a wrench around it and worry about it sliping. The BB tool uses the same interface and being able to attach it to a flex ended leverage wrench is awesome.

    Where Park goes 100% correct is their "mini chain brute". It's pack friendly for those times when you've broken a chain on the trail (and a wise person will carry a spare powerlink to make the job much quicker).

    Do make sure you get a chainring nut while your at it.

    Try Pricepoint.com and look in their tool department for lots of decent and cheap tools. There are some definite stinkers in their kits (like the round spoke wrench) but you can fill in the deficits with better tools.

  13. #13
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  14. #14
    Blanco
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    That small Sette tool kit from Performance is a bargain and has all you need. The medium kit just has a bunch of wrenches and screwdrivers that you should have already -- but may be worth the extra $10 if you want the kit to be totally self-supporting.

    I have one of the older "Lifu" toolkits (pre-ISIS -- I had to buy an ISIS tool separately). As a amateur mechanic that only works on my own bikes, I don't need the extra burliness of the Park tools, and neither do you.

    Add a cable cutter, awl, and big bastard file to whatever kit you get so that you can cut and finish cable housing. I found mine at the hardware store: it looked exactly like the Shimano tool but cost $25 instead of $60. The awl is to make the exit hole round again after the cutter squishes it, and the file is to file the end flat.

  15. #15
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    go with Park. yes its pricey but quality is key. with the diff options that park gives for kits its hard to go wrong. for workin at the LBS ive ran into some crap tools and some nice tools. the ones that last the longest and have best design park is the way to go.

  16. #16
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    go for the park stuff. it can be pricey but i just pick stuff up over time so you don't really notice how much it costs. their tools seem sturdy and well thought out. don't know if it was mentioned but pick up the y tool with the allen heads. . dave

  17. #17
    Blanco
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    I disagree: home mechanics don't need Park. If you use the Sette toolkit so often that you break something, then you can justify replacing the broken tool with a Park. But I bet this never happens unless you work in a shop. Save the money and get yourself the cable cutter, some housing, and some cable ends, which I guarantee you will (or should) use a lot more often than anything else.

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