Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 38
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    30

    Best FS manual hop wheelie

    Too old for hardtail
    My 429 isn't cooperating
    Want to bunny hop, manual and wheelie, haven't been able to
    Recommendations appreciated

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,771
    Abou the only 29er i can sucessfully sustain a longer manual are stumpjumper fsr with 60 mm stem and tall boy with a short stem and higher bar.

    Assume u know how to manual, jhop, wheelie on a regular 26 inch bike? Otherwise it is a bit hArder to learn on a 29 er unless u are tall.

  3. #3
    human dehumidifier
    Reputation: wv_bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,345
    There's a guy around here that does all that and more on some sort of a Niner dual suspension bike. He could probably do it on a trike though.
    But if you close your eyes it becomes so easy to see

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldZaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    578
    After 40 years on a hardtail (BMX then MTB), I bought a FS 29er last month. The first time I tried to bunny hop - just a small puddle on a forrest service road - I realized the technique would need some adjusting.

    The next attempt went a bit better. I essentially wheelie hopped in slow motion. As I approached the puddle, I leaned back, started to pull the front tire of the ground... but did this part a bit slower - and earlier. Then, I unloaded the rear as I would on a hard tail. That slight pause was enough to compress the rear suspension.
    Mountain bikers who don't road ride are usually slow.
    Roadies who don't mountain bike are usually d***s.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GTscoob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,154
    Have you learned how to bunnyhop with flat pedals? It's a good skill to learn. Or you can just practice the checkbook bunnyhop and buy some clipless pedals.

    My 29er is a lot harder to wheelie than a 26" but no more difficult to bunnyhop. Larger bottom bracket drop and longer chainstays on 29ers help to keep the front end down - good for confidence and pedalling up steep grades but terrible for playing around.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Billy Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by dirtaoist View Post
    Too old for hardtail
    My 429 isn't cooperating
    Want to bunny hop, manual and wheelie, haven't been able to
    Recommendations appreciated
    Devinci Atlas

    Check out the wheelbase and chainstay measurements vs what you are on. I was really surprised how easy it is to manual and bunny hop this thing.

    Best FS manual hop wheelie-photo.jpg

  7. #7
    Rohloff
    Reputation: bsdc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,517
    Get a 26er. I'm a huge fan of 29ers but their strength is their weakness ... stability. What you are asking is for your bike to destabilize and toss all or part of it in the air. 26ers are better at doing that.

    In the 29er world, I think the most unstable FS bikes are the Lenz bikes. The relatively high bottom bracket and short chainstay make them great for tossing around.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldZaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    578
    Quote Originally Posted by bsdc View Post
    Get a 26er. I'm a huge fan of 29ers but their strength is their weakness ... stability. What you are asking is for your bike to destabilize and toss all or part of it in the air. 26ers are better at doing that.

    In the 29er world, I think the most unstable FS bikes are the Lenz bikes. The relatively high bottom bracket and short chainstay make them great for tossing around.
    I actually found the FS 29er (Scalpel) to be very easy to toss around, wheelie, etc. And once I figure out a technique, I'm hopping over stuff on the trail just as easily as I was on the HT 26er. I think you just have to analyze what you're doing on the bike and adapt.

    Side note: I do recognize that my version of a FS 29er (Carbon Scalpel 1) may be working in my favor on this stuff - it's light and comparatively stiff. And I have no experience on other 29ers.
    Mountain bikers who don't road ride are usually slow.
    Roadies who don't mountain bike are usually d***s.

  9. #9
    Crop Dusting Magistrate
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    600
    My 2013 Kona Satori is very easy to manny and bunny hop, the only 29er I tested that could. It will be even better when I change the stem from 100mm to a 60mm
    It wasn't me

  10. #10
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,142
    Quick show of hands - how many here can actually, say, bunnyhop up a curb on flat pedals in their Nikes?

    Ok, now how many can actually manual (meaning, reach the balance point on the rear wheel and stay there for at least a few seconds without pedaling)?

    If you can't do the bunnyhop on flats, your skills need work, not your bike. If you can't do the second, that's ok - the only people I know who can are pro DH and BMX riders, really, along with some very serious trials guys. You will never really do a manual on the trail anyway, so don't worry about it (lifting the front wheel for a split second to drop off a little drop is not a "manual"). If you can get the front end up/land rear wheel first off ledges when you want to, that's all you need.

    That said, Lenz or the new Enduro are the two bikes I'd look at, depending on the travel and other features you want.

    -Walt
    Waltworks Custom Bicycles
    Park City, UT USA
    www.waltworks.com
    waltworks.blogspot.com

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldZaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    578
    Walt ^that^ was solid info. To your point, I can bunnyhop on flats/platforms or clipped but can't manual worth a #$*^... and kinda don't care. Even in my BMX days (could bunnyhop 33" on platforms), I couldn't manual for more than a couple feet. But on the trail, on the mtb, I've yet to encounter an obstacle that required a sustained manual. So, yeah - as long as you can bunnyhop 6-10", can manual enough to clear a whoop or set up for another obstacle (like a creek!), you're golden.
    Mountain bikers who don't road ride are usually slow.
    Roadies who don't mountain bike are usually d***s.

  12. #12
    fashion ho
    Reputation: Katz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,530
    Quote Originally Posted by Walt View Post
    Quick show of hands - how many here can actually, say, bunnyhop up a curb on flat pedals in their Nikes?
    Here! Nikes are too flashy for me, so I substituted them with a pair of Wally world steel toe work boots in the vids. I'm pretty sure I can do most of the stuff on a 29" HT, though I'm pretty sure it wouldn't be as easy.

    I agree with you that I wouldn't select a bike based solely on its agility if its primary usage is trail riding. If you seriously want to practice tricks, I'd get a beater 24" or 26" DJ bike in addition to a nice 29" trail bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by OldZaskar
    But on the trail, on the mtb, I've yet to encounter an obstacle that required a sustained manual. So, yeah - as long as you can bunnyhop 6-10", can manual enough to clear a whoop or set up for another obstacle (like a creek!), you're golden.
    Exactly.

    middle aged guy urban riding from Katz on Vimeo.



    30inch bunnyhop from Katz on Vimeo.


  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldZaskar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    578
    Quote Originally Posted by Katz View Post
    Here! Nikes are too flashy for me, so I substituted them with a pair of Wally world steel toe work boots in the vids. I'm pretty sure I can do most of the stuff on a 29" HT, though I'm pretty sure it wouldn't be as easy.

    I agree with you that I wouldn't select a bike based solely on its agility if its primary usage is trail riding. If you seriously want to practice tricks, I'd get a beater 24" or 26" DJ bike in addition to a nice 29" trail bike.
    Katz - that's pretty badass right there!
    Mountain bikers who don't road ride are usually slow.
    Roadies who don't mountain bike are usually d***s.

  14. #14
    fashion ho
    Reputation: Katz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,530
    Thanks!

  15. #15
    NMBP
    Reputation: gfs69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,145
    Quote Originally Posted by Walt View Post
    Quick show of hands - how many here can actually, say, bunnyhop up a curb on flat pedals in their Nikes?

    Ok, now how many can actually manual (meaning, reach the balance point on the rear wheel and stay there for at least a few seconds without pedaling)?

    If you can't do the bunnyhop on flats, your skills need work, not your bike. If you can't do the second, that's ok - the only people I know who can are pro DH and BMX riders, really, along with some very serious trials guys. You will never really do a manual on the trail anyway, so don't worry about it (lifting the front wheel for a split second to drop off a little drop is not a "manual"). If you can get the front end up/land rear wheel first off ledges when you want to, that's all you need.

    That said, Lenz or the new Enduro are the two bikes I'd look at, depending on the travel and other features you want.

    -Walt
    There goes Walt again, interjecting wisdom and common sense into random threads again.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    2,771
    Sustaining manual on the trail: Rollers, waterbars, stupid jumps that is way too close to the landing that you just immediately landed, smooth watercrossing, water puddles so that you can keep your toes nice and dry, and last but not least, streams...You guys dont read MBA I guess....In the 90s, almost always there is a test rider manualing across the stream on a test bike while the other guys are either getting wet or wheelieing.

    Once you know how to do J-Hop (not bunny hop a curb)/manual/wheelie...etc, it just take some slight adjustments to do it again on a 29er. However as I originally stated, it is much easier to learn on a 26" bike, and much much easier on a 20" BMX/Trialsin bike

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    174
    I don't feel so bad now reading this thread! It's been a while since I've ridden a MTB and just picked up a '12 Anthem X 2 29er. I simply cannot manual for poop, but I have figured out how to bunny hop a curb with the flat pedals without too much effort. I thought I was just getting too old!

    I'll be cheating by next week though. Really missing clipless pedals while climbing since switching from a road bike, so I have a set of Mallet 2's in the mail...

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    96
    I cannot manual, wheelie or bunny hop, been riding 5 years, all on a 29er full suspension.
    I'm getting, if you want to learn, go 26" with flats. Flats I got, 26" not.
    I do have a Lenz Leviathat 3" and a Pivot 429, never ride the Lenz, that may change.
    I'm 67, if that makes a difference, any pointers?
    Buuny Hopping would make logs, large rocks and and gaps more doable .
    I thought a manual was a prerequsite of a bunny hop.
    thanks
    dirtaoist

  19. #19
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,142
    You, my friend, are awesome.

    -Walt
    Waltworks Custom Bicycles
    Park City, UT USA
    www.waltworks.com
    waltworks.blogspot.com

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jncarpenter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    6,767
    The biggest obstacle to manual/j-hop a 29er is not really the CS length (IMHO), it's the relationship of the bb height compared to the axle height. On a 29er, the axle height is higher than the average bb height, which requires more rearward thrust from the hips to loft the front. Once you get that figured out (if you can manual a 26"), the rest should be a piece of cake. The shorter CS on a 29er can help you cheat the front up, but if your technique is solid...even an 18" CS won't hold you back


  21. #21
    fashion ho
    Reputation: Katz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,530
    Quote Originally Posted by Maheoway View Post
    I cannot manual, wheelie or bunny hop, been riding 5 years, all on a 29er full suspension.
    I'm getting, if you want to learn, go 26" with flats. Flats I got, 26" not.
    I do have a Lenz Leviathat 3" and a Pivot 429, never ride the Lenz, that may change.
    I'm 67, if that makes a difference, any pointers?
    Buuny Hopping would make logs, large rocks and and gaps more doable .
    I thought a manual was a prerequsite of a bunny hop.
    thanks
    I don't think your age matters much as long as you are in decent shape. It certainly takes more time to recover from a crash, however.

    I'd start with wheelie. I think it's the easiest among the 3 you mentioned.

    - Shift into low gear (small ring front, middle to large cog in the rear). Lower the saddle where you can get both feet flat on the ground with your butt on the saddle.

    - Position the crank so the pedal for your leading foot is 45 degrees up from level. Keep the bad foot on the ground. Stay seated on the saddle.

    - Crouch down, and just as you pull up the handlebar, give the pedal a good kick and lean back. If you get the timing right, your front wheel should come up without much effort. If not, try pedaling sooner or later. Experiment with the timing, as well as gearing.

    - Keep doing that until you nail the timing, then start practicing with both feet on the pedals.

    EDIT Here's a video.

    Wheelie practice from Katz on Vimeo.




    Manual is a lot harder, at least it was to me. The way to get the front wheel up is a little different. You pull the handle bar more towards back (as opposed to up for wheelie), while pushing the bike forward and away from you with the pedals. The PDF file in the following link helped me a lot.

    Mountain Bike Action Magazine Article on “the Manual” by Bikeskills’ Joe Lawwill


    If your objective is to go over logs, rocks, etc, and don't mind slowing down, you could also try pedal up. It's an old school trials skill. Kind of like a bunnyhop in slow motion. You pedal to get the front wheel up, which makes it a lot easier on a 29er. It is easier and safer to practice it on a ledge like in the video. I'd start with something a little taller than a typical curb. Logs are slightly more difficult as the front wheel rolls off as you get the rear wheel up, but the body motion is the same.

    Pedal-up Jackal & Distortion from Katz on Vimeo.

    Last edited by Katz; 03-28-2013 at 08:28 PM. Reason: Added a video

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    95
    Unstable can be a GOOD thing, I currently swap rides between my Lenz 3.0 and my Mojo 650b/26. Mojo is a little plusher.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jncarpenter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    6,767
    Quote Originally Posted by Katz View Post
    I don't think your age matters much as long as you are in decent shape. It certainly takes more time to recover from a crash, however.

    I'd start with wheelie. I think it's the easiest among the 3 you mentioned.

    - Shift into low gear (small ring front, middle to large cog in the rear). Lower the saddle where you can get both feet flat on the ground with your butt on the saddle.

    - Position the crank so the pedal for your leading foot is 45 degrees up from level. Keep the bad foot on the ground. Stay seated on the saddle.

    - Crouch down, and just as you pull up the handlebar, give the pedal a good kick. If you get the timing right, your front wheel should come up without much effort. If not, try pedaling sooner or later. Experiment with the timing, as well as gearing.

    - Keep doing that until you nail the timing, then start practicing with both feet on the pedals.


    Manual is a lot harder, at least it was to me. The way to get the front wheel up is a little different. You pull the handle bar more towards back (as opposed to up for wheelie), while pushing the bike forward and away from you with the pedals. The PDF file in the following link helped me a lot.

    Mountain Bike Action Magazine Article on “the Manual” by Bikeskills’ Joe Lawwill


    If your objective is to go over logs, rocks, etc, and don't mind slowing down, you could also try pedal up. It's an old school trials skill. Kind of like a bunnyhop in slow motion. You pedal to get the front wheel up, which makes it a lot easier on a 29er. It is easier and safer to practice it on a ledge like in the video. I'd start with something a little taller than a typical curb. Logs are slightly more difficult as the front wheel rolls off as you get the rear wheel up, but the body motion is the same.

    Pedal-up Jackal & Distortion from Katz on Vimeo.

    Great vid & spot on advice!


  24. #24
    Flow like water
    Reputation: DavyRay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    711
    Good freakin' grief!
    "Head injuries are pretty high-consequence" - AndrwSwitch

  25. #25
    cowbell
    Reputation: Cotharyus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    1,772
    I'm pretty sure Katz has made the point here. That's some pretty slick riding. You being a couple years older than me is going to make my age a lame excuse for the reason I don't do stuff like that any more. Back in the day, we used to bunny hop trash cans out in the street on BMX bikes, and I can still make my Anthem 29'er do a very respectable height/distance - but then I'm clipless doing that too. Last time I tried to bunny hop without clipless, I very nearly hurt myself. Of course, if I had actually put flats on to try it, rather than trying to ride with my not-quite-walmart steel toed boots on my clipless pedals, that may have turned out differently.

    Short version - all of what you're talking about can be done on most FS 29ers, it's just a matter of how much effort you have to put into it to do it, and changing technique a little to allow for suspension. All of these things are easier on my rigid SS 29er than my FS bike.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Wheelie Passion
    By brianpalser in forum Passion
    Replies: 59
    Last Post: 10-28-2011, 02:30 AM
  2. Am I too old to wheelie?
    By interdigitate in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 71
    Last Post: 09-01-2011, 11:27 AM
  3. wheelie & manual on FS
    By butasan in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-26-2011, 03:28 AM
  4. Can't even ride a wheelie!
    By gemini9 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 04-27-2011, 11:05 PM
  5. Saturday San Tan Wheelie Jam!
    By luckybastard in forum Arizona
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-18-2011, 02:19 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •