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Thread: Bent Rim?

  1. #1
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    Upset Bent Rim?

    I'm new here and new to biking. Last Thursday I bought the 2013 Specialized Camber 29er. I've done 2 trails so far. Today I had a small fall. I cornered too tightly and fell off, hopped back on and kept riding.

    When I went to put the bike back on my car I noticed the rim was bent. The guy at my LBS used the term "taco" and said it was unfixable. Unfortnatly I dont have a pic of it right now.

    But I dont know what to do. The bike rep said he would call me after he contacted Specialized. I didnt jump, hit a rock or log. There were only leaves where I fell. It wasnt even that hard of a fall and I dont remember the rim being bent after anyway.

    I looked at Specialized's warranty and it said they will only replace it due to defect.

    My pervious bike was from Walmart. It bounced of rocks, trees, down 2 ravines, and many crashes and bunny hops.

    My questions are, am I going to have to replace a wheel after dropping 2g's on a bike I got less than a week ago. And are 29er's that more less durable than a 26? Specialized's website states the width of the wheel is 24mm wide. So idk, but do I really have to treat a $2k bike like glass?

    Also to give u some stats on me. I ride a small frame. I am 5'4" and maye 140lbs w/ my gear on.

  2. #2
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    I have not been around riding that long either, but I am not under the impression that you would be able to ride on a rim that is "tacoed". If you rode it out of there and did not notice it right away, I'll bet there is someone out there who can fix it.

  3. #3
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    Yes, TheDocTx is right. A truly taco'd wheel will look like a taco and will not roll at all. The wheel may really be unfixable, but if you were able to ride on it then it was not taco'd. The mechanic was probably just using the term to emphasize that the wheel is dead.

    Good luck.
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    You do have to whack a wheel pretty hard to ruin a rim. And usually you lose a spoke and get a pinch flat too.
    But with Spec you never know. The wheel may not have been properly tensioned and that would be a defect in manufacturing.
    If they offer a new wheel pay the difference and get a Roval Control Carbon 29. Their only good wheel.

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    Ugh, you want him to pay the difference? What would that be, like $600?
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

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    No flat, no spoke loss or damage. No scratches on the rim itself either. It is a complete mystery to me. I'm just irritated I paid so much for the bike, rode it twice and now it's in the shop

  7. #7
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    If you jack-knifed the front wheel and put a decent amount of lateral force on it, it is not hard to tweak a wheel badly. The fact that it's a 29'er only makes it easier to tweak.
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tibug View Post
    Ugh, you want him to pay the difference? What would that be, like $600?
    Maybe offer $400 extra for a front upgrade. I know I would go for it.
    If he could get away from the crappy Hi/Lo rear to a star ratchet I would go another $400 for that. Everyone would come out ahead.

    If they decide not to warranty it have it rebuilt with an ArchEx rim.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrashDummy31 View Post
    I'm new here and new to biking. Last Thursday I bought the 2013 Specialized Camber 29er. I've done 2 trails so far. Today I had a small fall. I cornered too tightly and fell off, hopped back on and kept riding.

    When I went to put the bike back on my car I noticed the rim was bent. The guy at my LBS used the term "taco" and said it was unfixable. Unfortnatly I dont have a pic of it right now.

    But I dont know what to do. The bike rep said he would call me after he contacted Specialized. I didnt jump, hit a rock or log. There were only leaves where I fell. It wasnt even that hard of a fall and I dont remember the rim being bent after anyway.

    I looked at Specialized's warranty and it said they will only replace it due to defect.

    My pervious bike was from Walmart. It bounced of rocks, trees, down 2 ravines, and many crashes and bunny hops.

    My questions are, am I going to have to replace a wheel after dropping 2g's on a bike I got less than a week ago. And are 29er's that more less durable than a 26? Specialized's website states the width of the wheel is 24mm wide. So idk, but do I really have to treat a $2k bike like glass?

    Also to give u some stats on me. I ride a small frame. I am 5'4" and maye 140lbs w/ my gear on.
    If youre new to biking you just arent going to be as smooth of a rider as someone more experienced, which means you probably put more stress on a bike than others. The more expensive the bike the lighter it is. Some reliability is sacrificed with that weight savings.

  10. #10
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    Actually NO, you don't! If you side load the crap out of a wheel you can EASILY taco a wheel, they are meant to be strong for straight on frontal loads, but side load them and it doesn't take much - sounds like what the OP did. Saw this happen not 6 weeks ago to a guy (on 26" wheeled bike) just went into a corner wrong, washed the front and side loaded it and that was it.

    As to if you need to treat your $2k bike like glass compared to your WallyWorld bike? Did you by chance heft both and compare? If you over build shit it can sometimes take a beating, if you build something to just above the limits of weight, not so much. Curious what trails you used to ride with that WW bike and what trails you're riding now, also what sort of speeds on the two?

    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    You do have to whack a wheel pretty hard to ruin a rim. And usually you lose a spoke and get a pinch flat too.
    But with Spec you never know. The wheel may not have been properly tensioned and that would be a defect in manufacturing.
    If they offer a new wheel pay the difference and get a Roval Control Carbon 29. Their only good wheel.
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    You may have seen it but not on a properly built wheel--probably machine built.

    Properly built wheels can take side loading because they are tensioned correctly. A rear wheel needs to be tensioned to different amounts on the drive side and the non drive side to create the dish for the cluster and get the rim centered between the chainstays.
    The amount of proper tension difference is usually about 115-125kgf on the spokes of the drive side and 90-95kgf on the NDS. The same is true with a lesser difference when you build a front wheel to accommodate the brake rotor.
    This is part of wheel truing.
    But you can true the wheel with dish enough to run spaced to look correct at many levels of tension. And this stepped tensioning is how a wheel can be built.
    A rear wheel can look good with DS tension at 85-90 and NDS at 60-65. When you side load it one way the NDS spokes will lose tension and the nipples will move from vibration to give you a wheel out of true or worse.

    Want to check your wheels? Take out the skewer. Put magazines on the floor under the hub and wheel rim at 6 o'clock. Kneel on the rim on another mag at 6 o.clock. Push down the rim with your hands at 12 o'clock. Flip the wheel and repeat to check the other side. This simulates side loading and is part of hand wheel building to seat and stress relief spokes. A correctly built wheel with enough spoke tension will be very hard to push down. But you can produce a wheel that looks and spins true at lower spoke tension amounts. One you can flex with your weight by pushing down.

    The OP's wheels are likely machine built and the front improperly tensioned to have failed like it did. A tension meter can be used to check the wheel at your lbs with you there to see the readings.
    It's a manufacturing defect.

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    I think the lesson to learn here is: Welcome to mountain biking, these things happen. On the bright side now you can think about upgrading the wheel set so this type of thing is less likely to happen again. Something like a set of ZTR Arch EX's for around $600 would be an excellent addition to that bike. I hope you sort it out soon and can get back out riding.

    Cheers!

  13. #13
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    My stumpjumper's stock wheels were poorly built junk. I'm a fairly smooth riding clyde so I got about a year out of them before I relaced the stock hubs into Salsa Semis with DT double butted spokes and brass nipples.
    After a little more time, I learned what a hunk of crap the DT Swiss Onyx rear hub was.
    The wheels have served me well for a few years now. Seeing how I have a few out of state trips on the horizon, I'm replacing them with Flows on Hope hubs.
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  14. #14
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    My stock wheels on my specialized were crap. Warranted out 2 hubs and the wheels constantly needed to be trued. Upgraded to some stans flows I found on craigslist and haven't had a problem since.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    After a little more time, I learned what a hunk of crap the DT Swiss Onyx rear hub was.
    The wheels have served me well for a few years now. Seeing how I have a few out of state trips on the horizon, I'm replacing them with Flows on Hope hubs.
    Junk Asian generic pawl freehub rears with a Dt sticker. Not anything like the star ratchet rear hubs of the 340, 350, 240 and 180 series. I choose 36 tooth star ratchets with excellent performance. And quiet.
    But people like Specialized use it to rip you off. The front hub is just two sealed bearings in any case so heavy, but not much can go wrong.

  16. #16
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    Properly built wheels are better at withstanding sideloads, but they can also be destroyed. I've seen racers with wheels worth way into the quadruple digits taco wheels. It happens. Go to races and you will see it. Testing a wheel by putting your body weight on it sideways is a good test, but it does not simulate the actual forces the wheel sees if it is jackknifed and loaded with the momentum of the rider and bike.
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

  17. #17
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    you might wanna get yourself a Park Tool TM-1 spoke tension meter so you can double-check your spoke tension.Cost around 50 or 60 bucks.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Junk Asian generic pawl freehub rears with a Dt sticker. Not anything like the star ratchet rear hubs of the 340, 350, 240 and 180 series. I choose 36 tooth star ratchets with excellent performance. And quiet.
    But people like Specialized use it to rip you off. The front hub is just two sealed bearings in any case so heavy, but not much can go wrong.
    Exactly.
    I like turtles

  19. #19
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    I taco'd both rims on my Specialized Hardrock Sport Disc last fall. Spec. replaced them both under warranty, but they were out of stock on the rims that came on the bike, as well as the next level up, so they gave me a credit for the wheels & my LBS got me a set of Handspun wheels with XT hubs and WTB rims, definitely an improvement. Spec gets a bad rap, sometimes for legitimate reasons, but they've taken good care of me.
    Hopefully your LBS will be a good advocate on your behalf and their Specialized rep will be responsive and they'll take care of you.
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    I'm in Rochester, NY I was on the Webster Hokjack trail yesterday. Couldnt have been going more than 10 or 12 mph. It is my first bike. And it was more than I wanted to spend. It is the camber base model so aluminum frame.

    I understand that more expensive = lighter materials = can take less of a beating.
    I went w/ Specialized because when I rode the Camber, it felt like it was made for me. I tried GT's Cannondales, Diamondbacks. I kept going back to the Camber though.

    And I was riding as it was intended. If I upgrade over time that is my choice, but to have something like this happen within a week of having the bike? Idk..

    Also I'm a small guy, so crushing frames and wheels under my weight I really dont think is possible. I'm the size and weight of an average woman lol

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    I taco'd both rims on my Specialized Hardrock Sport Disc last fall. Spec. replaced them both under warranty, but they were out of stock on the rims that came on the bike, as well as the next level up, so they gave me a credit for the wheels & my LBS got me a set of Handspun wheels with XT hubs and WTB rims, definitely an improvement. Spec gets a bad rap, sometimes for legitimate reasons, but they've taken good care of me.
    Hopefully your LBS will be a good advocate on your behalf and their Specialized rep will be responsive and they'll take care of you.
    How did u taco them? Was it a crash or defect?

  22. #22
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    Next time include Trek and Scott in your demo tour, better geo.
    Looks like you should get a replacement. If a credit you may be limited by the 24/28mm front fork dropouts specific to Specialized.
    The Roval Control Carbon 29 has changeable endcaps for a future build. That is the only Spec wheel to own.

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    They fixed it! Idk how, but they did. And the rim shows no sign of stress or anything. So I'm all good

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrashDummy31 View Post
    They fixed it! Idk how, but they did. And the rim shows no sign of stress or anything. So I'm all good
    I would ask for the spoke tension measurements on the front and rear wheel when you go in. Let the tech show you how it's done. Worth a couple minutes to get both wheels checked in person.

  25. #25
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    I'm glad. That was obviously frustrating. I've never damaged a wheel/rim in over 20 years of mtn biking (Giant - Raleigh - Giant). Hopefully they checked the spoke tension etc. on the rear wheel!

    Have fun and good luck.

  26. #26
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    Somehow missed the SpecialED part in the AM. Yup, machine built, no lube to speak of, not properly tensioned, same story for pretty much all their wheels on bikes under $4k. I rebuilt a set for a guy from a Rockhopper that kept breaking spokes, going out of true etc, used DT Comp spokes and same hub and rim, wheels have been going without being touched on must be 4, maybe 5 years now. Guys wheel who tacoed was yes, a machine built wheel on a Trek 3700, probably not built like a custom wheel with proper tension.

    Statement about side loading still stands though, a well built wheel will take a lot more than a machine built one, but it'll still fail much easier than taking a direct, head out hit.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrashDummy31 View Post
    How did u taco them? Was it a crash or defect?
    tacoed the front when the front tire, a WTB Bronson Race, came off in a 20+ mph downhill corner. I mangled the rear after manualing up a curb and mis judging my speed. The latter was entirely my fault, but they replaced them both, gratis.
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    What the f**** it just happened again! The spoke tension on the rear wheel is super loose according to an instructor I met on the trail. This time I was about to go into a bank turn to the left. I didnt crank my bars, I was leaning into the turn, think I hit a rock (the size of my fist) as I was turning and flew off. It bent the hell out of it. The instructor I met was able to stand on it and get it back most of the way straight. I'm a new rider so I am going to fall more. But the guy at my LBS said the bike I got would be able to take that beating. So far, not so much.

    I have the 2013 Camber 29er.

  29. #29
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    I'm no expert (far from it), but I would have to guess it was never really fixed in the first place. That or your the unluckiest SOB on MTBR.

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    Am interested in how you ended up since I bought my 2013 camber 29 w weeks ago and second run I buckled the front wheel after a crash into bushes. Was surprised that it buckled so easily. It's about 5mm of buckle and about to take back to specialized shop to see if they can fix.
    I echo OP sentiments. This is a 2k bike so it should take a decent amount of beating.
    Will post back how I get on as well.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiluea_for_sale View Post
    Am interested in how you ended up since I bought my 2013 camber 29 w weeks ago and second run I buckled the front wheel after a crash into bushes. Was surprised that it buckled so easily. It's about 5mm of buckle and about to take back to specialized shop to see if they can fix.
    I echo OP sentiments. This is a 2k bike so it should take a decent amount of beating.
    Will post back how I get on as well.
    You may echo the OP and we'll echo you're wrong as well.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Actually NO, you don't! If you side load the crap out of a wheel you can EASILY taco a wheel, they are meant to be strong for straight on frontal loads, but side load them and it doesn't take much - sounds like what the OP did. Saw this happen not 6 weeks ago to a guy (on 26" wheeled bike) just went into a corner wrong, washed the front and side loaded it and that was it.

    As to if you need to treat your $2k bike like glass compared to your WallyWorld bike? Did you by chance heft both and compare? If you over build shit it can sometimes take a beating, if you build something to just above the limits of weight, not so much. Curious what trails you used to ride with that WW bike and what trails you're riding now, also what sort of speeds on the two?
    +1
    When it hit something in the wrong place it can take very little to knock it out of shape.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by tibug View Post
    Ugh, you want him to pay the difference? What would that be, like $600?
    Right on the money.
    I just got a quote from Specialized about two week's ago for Roval SL Carbon hoop's only to build my new wheel set.
    They said $600 I asked for the pair he said no each I almost fell off my chair lol I was thinking $350 each to $400 max.
    I'm going with Light Bicycle Carbon instead.
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  34. #34
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    Sounds like some cheap wheels, hopefully they will get it worked out for you.
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    I actually haven't crushed another rim since June. For me, I just look at it as inexperience. I've actually learned how to ride a 29er and corner correctly. That was half my problem. But who ever said the side load was entirely correct. Also in theory, front wheels should be stronger. But if it were made stronger it would be heavier and therefore slower. Who knows, take the good w/ the bad I guess.

    But my original Camber front rim I killed within 3 weeks of having the bike

  36. #36
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    I took my buckled wheel to lbs and they got it true but tension is uneven. Not really very pleased as it's new and the crash was very tame. I will monitor it closely. My last bike took 15 years to buckle rear. It is a hardtail but cost half what this did

  37. #37
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    Remember: more expensive doesn't necessarily mean tougher.

  38. #38
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    I have seen more novices' bent 29'er rims in the last 3 months than the last 3 years of 26" combined. They were done on easy trails too. I wonder if the new rims and manufacturing are really crap, or is it the 29" format?

  39. #39
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    More above-ability hucking after watching Whistler youtube vids?

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    Lol I enjoyed those vids but have been mountain biking for 15+ years.
    It's was a jump that took me off line and I didn't setup right but I rode away no injury other than bent rim. I accept I'm no expert but as consumers we should ask questions about quality here. A 2 grand bike should take some basic level of punishment. Otherwise what's the point. My hard tail of 15 years should not handle the same crash and come out better. But I think it would. I don't recall the salesman saying I was too novice for the bike or that I should not ride on mild mtb tracks.
    The point of the post is that if others have similar issues it helps build a case for warranty repairs.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiluea_for_sale View Post
    Lol I enjoyed those vids but have been mountain biking for 15+ years.
    It's was a jump that took me off line and I didn't setup right but I rode away no injury other than bent rim. I accept I'm no expert but as consumers we should ask questions about quality here. A 2 grand bike should take some basic level of punishment. Otherwise what's the point. My hard tail of 15 years should not handle the same crash and come out better. But I think it would. I don't recall the salesman saying I was too novice for the bike or that I should not ride on mild mtb tracks.
    The point of the post is that if others have similar issues it helps build a case for warranty repairs.
    Your bike can take a lot more punishment than you think. Price has nothing to do with as has been mentioned multiple times in this thread.

    Bottom line, $100 or $2500 wheel set, if you side load it they will bend. Period, now please stop crying about it!
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  42. #42
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    You again.

    Whats the point of a forum if people cant share their ideas opinions with others. And why are you suddenly rude - I have not been rude to you or anyone else.

    I am replying to a specific post about bent rims - whats your issue? I think my experiences are relevant for this specific thread - if you don't want to read posts about other people with bent rims - them simply don't read the thread.
    And why do you assume that you represent everyone else view ? Kinda arrogant.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiluea_for_sale View Post
    You again.

    Whats the point of a forum if people cant share their ideas opinions with others. And why are you suddenly rude - I have not been rude to you or anyone else.

    I am replying to a specific post about bent rims - whats your issue? I think my experiences are relevant for this specific thread - if you don't want to read posts about other people with bent rims - them simply don't read the thread.
    And why do you assume that you represent everyone else view ? Kinda arrogant.
    the guy has a point, every post you make (all 4) has to do with your bent rim and how the way you crashed shouldnt have bent the rim.. Whats arrogant is your inability to understand that you can bend ANY rim in a crash, or even hard landings... your lack of ability is what bent the rim. Time to move on.
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