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Thread: Bent Rim?

  1. #1
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    Upset Bent Rim?

    I'm new here and new to biking. Last Thursday I bought the 2013 Specialized Camber 29er. I've done 2 trails so far. Today I had a small fall. I cornered too tightly and fell off, hopped back on and kept riding.

    When I went to put the bike back on my car I noticed the rim was bent. The guy at my LBS used the term "taco" and said it was unfixable. Unfortnatly I dont have a pic of it right now.

    But I dont know what to do. The bike rep said he would call me after he contacted Specialized. I didnt jump, hit a rock or log. There were only leaves where I fell. It wasnt even that hard of a fall and I dont remember the rim being bent after anyway.

    I looked at Specialized's warranty and it said they will only replace it due to defect.

    My pervious bike was from Walmart. It bounced of rocks, trees, down 2 ravines, and many crashes and bunny hops.

    My questions are, am I going to have to replace a wheel after dropping 2g's on a bike I got less than a week ago. And are 29er's that more less durable than a 26? Specialized's website states the width of the wheel is 24mm wide. So idk, but do I really have to treat a $2k bike like glass?

    Also to give u some stats on me. I ride a small frame. I am 5'4" and maye 140lbs w/ my gear on.

  2. #2
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    I have not been around riding that long either, but I am not under the impression that you would be able to ride on a rim that is "tacoed". If you rode it out of there and did not notice it right away, I'll bet there is someone out there who can fix it.

  3. #3
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    Yes, TheDocTx is right. A truly taco'd wheel will look like a taco and will not roll at all. The wheel may really be unfixable, but if you were able to ride on it then it was not taco'd. The mechanic was probably just using the term to emphasize that the wheel is dead.

    Good luck.
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

  4. #4
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    You do have to whack a wheel pretty hard to ruin a rim. And usually you lose a spoke and get a pinch flat too.
    But with Spec you never know. The wheel may not have been properly tensioned and that would be a defect in manufacturing.
    If they offer a new wheel pay the difference and get a Roval Control Carbon 29. Their only good wheel.

  5. #5
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    Ugh, you want him to pay the difference? What would that be, like $600?
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

  6. #6
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    No flat, no spoke loss or damage. No scratches on the rim itself either. It is a complete mystery to me. I'm just irritated I paid so much for the bike, rode it twice and now it's in the shop

  7. #7
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    If you jack-knifed the front wheel and put a decent amount of lateral force on it, it is not hard to tweak a wheel badly. The fact that it's a 29'er only makes it easier to tweak.
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tibug View Post
    Ugh, you want him to pay the difference? What would that be, like $600?
    Maybe offer $400 extra for a front upgrade. I know I would go for it.
    If he could get away from the crappy Hi/Lo rear to a star ratchet I would go another $400 for that. Everyone would come out ahead.

    If they decide not to warranty it have it rebuilt with an ArchEx rim.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrashDummy31 View Post
    I'm new here and new to biking. Last Thursday I bought the 2013 Specialized Camber 29er. I've done 2 trails so far. Today I had a small fall. I cornered too tightly and fell off, hopped back on and kept riding.

    When I went to put the bike back on my car I noticed the rim was bent. The guy at my LBS used the term "taco" and said it was unfixable. Unfortnatly I dont have a pic of it right now.

    But I dont know what to do. The bike rep said he would call me after he contacted Specialized. I didnt jump, hit a rock or log. There were only leaves where I fell. It wasnt even that hard of a fall and I dont remember the rim being bent after anyway.

    I looked at Specialized's warranty and it said they will only replace it due to defect.

    My pervious bike was from Walmart. It bounced of rocks, trees, down 2 ravines, and many crashes and bunny hops.

    My questions are, am I going to have to replace a wheel after dropping 2g's on a bike I got less than a week ago. And are 29er's that more less durable than a 26? Specialized's website states the width of the wheel is 24mm wide. So idk, but do I really have to treat a $2k bike like glass?

    Also to give u some stats on me. I ride a small frame. I am 5'4" and maye 140lbs w/ my gear on.
    If youre new to biking you just arent going to be as smooth of a rider as someone more experienced, which means you probably put more stress on a bike than others. The more expensive the bike the lighter it is. Some reliability is sacrificed with that weight savings.

  10. #10
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    Actually NO, you don't! If you side load the crap out of a wheel you can EASILY taco a wheel, they are meant to be strong for straight on frontal loads, but side load them and it doesn't take much - sounds like what the OP did. Saw this happen not 6 weeks ago to a guy (on 26" wheeled bike) just went into a corner wrong, washed the front and side loaded it and that was it.

    As to if you need to treat your $2k bike like glass compared to your WallyWorld bike? Did you by chance heft both and compare? If you over build **** it can sometimes take a beating, if you build something to just above the limits of weight, not so much. Curious what trails you used to ride with that WW bike and what trails you're riding now, also what sort of speeds on the two?

    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    You do have to whack a wheel pretty hard to ruin a rim. And usually you lose a spoke and get a pinch flat too.
    But with Spec you never know. The wheel may not have been properly tensioned and that would be a defect in manufacturing.
    If they offer a new wheel pay the difference and get a Roval Control Carbon 29. Their only good wheel.
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  11. #11
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    You may have seen it but not on a properly built wheel--probably machine built.

    Properly built wheels can take side loading because they are tensioned correctly. A rear wheel needs to be tensioned to different amounts on the drive side and the non drive side to create the dish for the cluster and get the rim centered between the chainstays.
    The amount of proper tension difference is usually about 115-125kgf on the spokes of the drive side and 90-95kgf on the NDS. The same is true with a lesser difference when you build a front wheel to accommodate the brake rotor.
    This is part of wheel truing.
    But you can true the wheel with dish enough to run spaced to look correct at many levels of tension. And this stepped tensioning is how a wheel can be built.
    A rear wheel can look good with DS tension at 85-90 and NDS at 60-65. When you side load it one way the NDS spokes will lose tension and the nipples will move from vibration to give you a wheel out of true or worse.

    Want to check your wheels? Take out the skewer. Put magazines on the floor under the hub and wheel rim at 6 o'clock. Kneel on the rim on another mag at 6 o.clock. Push down the rim with your hands at 12 o'clock. Flip the wheel and repeat to check the other side. This simulates side loading and is part of hand wheel building to seat and stress relief spokes. A correctly built wheel with enough spoke tension will be very hard to push down. But you can produce a wheel that looks and spins true at lower spoke tension amounts. One you can flex with your weight by pushing down.

    The OP's wheels are likely machine built and the front improperly tensioned to have failed like it did. A tension meter can be used to check the wheel at your lbs with you there to see the readings.
    It's a manufacturing defect.

  12. #12
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    I think the lesson to learn here is: Welcome to mountain biking, these things happen. On the bright side now you can think about upgrading the wheel set so this type of thing is less likely to happen again. Something like a set of ZTR Arch EX's for around $600 would be an excellent addition to that bike. I hope you sort it out soon and can get back out riding.

    Cheers!

  13. #13
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    My stumpjumper's stock wheels were poorly built junk. I'm a fairly smooth riding clyde so I got about a year out of them before I relaced the stock hubs into Salsa Semis with DT double butted spokes and brass nipples.
    After a little more time, I learned what a hunk of crap the DT Swiss Onyx rear hub was.
    The wheels have served me well for a few years now. Seeing how I have a few out of state trips on the horizon, I'm replacing them with Flows on Hope hubs.
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  14. #14
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    My stock wheels on my specialized were crap. Warranted out 2 hubs and the wheels constantly needed to be trued. Upgraded to some stans flows I found on craigslist and haven't had a problem since.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    After a little more time, I learned what a hunk of crap the DT Swiss Onyx rear hub was.
    The wheels have served me well for a few years now. Seeing how I have a few out of state trips on the horizon, I'm replacing them with Flows on Hope hubs.
    Junk Asian generic pawl freehub rears with a Dt sticker. Not anything like the star ratchet rear hubs of the 340, 350, 240 and 180 series. I choose 36 tooth star ratchets with excellent performance. And quiet.
    But people like Specialized use it to rip you off. The front hub is just two sealed bearings in any case so heavy, but not much can go wrong.

  16. #16
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    Properly built wheels are better at withstanding sideloads, but they can also be destroyed. I've seen racers with wheels worth way into the quadruple digits taco wheels. It happens. Go to races and you will see it. Testing a wheel by putting your body weight on it sideways is a good test, but it does not simulate the actual forces the wheel sees if it is jackknifed and loaded with the momentum of the rider and bike.
    I wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then.

  17. #17
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    you might wanna get yourself a Park Tool TM-1 spoke tension meter so you can double-check your spoke tension.Cost around 50 or 60 bucks.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    Junk Asian generic pawl freehub rears with a Dt sticker. Not anything like the star ratchet rear hubs of the 340, 350, 240 and 180 series. I choose 36 tooth star ratchets with excellent performance. And quiet.
    But people like Specialized use it to rip you off. The front hub is just two sealed bearings in any case so heavy, but not much can go wrong.
    Exactly.
    I like turtles

  19. #19
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    I taco'd both rims on my Specialized Hardrock Sport Disc last fall. Spec. replaced them both under warranty, but they were out of stock on the rims that came on the bike, as well as the next level up, so they gave me a credit for the wheels & my LBS got me a set of Handspun wheels with XT hubs and WTB rims, definitely an improvement. Spec gets a bad rap, sometimes for legitimate reasons, but they've taken good care of me.
    Hopefully your LBS will be a good advocate on your behalf and their Specialized rep will be responsive and they'll take care of you.
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  20. #20
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    I'm in Rochester, NY I was on the Webster Hokjack trail yesterday. Couldnt have been going more than 10 or 12 mph. It is my first bike. And it was more than I wanted to spend. It is the camber base model so aluminum frame.

    I understand that more expensive = lighter materials = can take less of a beating.
    I went w/ Specialized because when I rode the Camber, it felt like it was made for me. I tried GT's Cannondales, Diamondbacks. I kept going back to the Camber though.

    And I was riding as it was intended. If I upgrade over time that is my choice, but to have something like this happen within a week of having the bike? Idk..

    Also I'm a small guy, so crushing frames and wheels under my weight I really dont think is possible. I'm the size and weight of an average woman lol

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    I taco'd both rims on my Specialized Hardrock Sport Disc last fall. Spec. replaced them both under warranty, but they were out of stock on the rims that came on the bike, as well as the next level up, so they gave me a credit for the wheels & my LBS got me a set of Handspun wheels with XT hubs and WTB rims, definitely an improvement. Spec gets a bad rap, sometimes for legitimate reasons, but they've taken good care of me.
    Hopefully your LBS will be a good advocate on your behalf and their Specialized rep will be responsive and they'll take care of you.
    How did u taco them? Was it a crash or defect?

  22. #22
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    Next time include Trek and Scott in your demo tour, better geo.
    Looks like you should get a replacement. If a credit you may be limited by the 24/28mm front fork dropouts specific to Specialized.
    The Roval Control Carbon 29 has changeable endcaps for a future build. That is the only Spec wheel to own.

  23. #23
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    They fixed it! Idk how, but they did. And the rim shows no sign of stress or anything. So I'm all good

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrashDummy31 View Post
    They fixed it! Idk how, but they did. And the rim shows no sign of stress or anything. So I'm all good
    I would ask for the spoke tension measurements on the front and rear wheel when you go in. Let the tech show you how it's done. Worth a couple minutes to get both wheels checked in person.

  25. #25
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    I'm glad. That was obviously frustrating. I've never damaged a wheel/rim in over 20 years of mtn biking (Giant - Raleigh - Giant). Hopefully they checked the spoke tension etc. on the rear wheel!

    Have fun and good luck.

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