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  1. #1
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    Anyone still make a 29er HT frame with straight fork and QRs?

    Thinking of selling my 29er orbea frame and getting something a little more relaxed, non-racy. I know thru-axles and tapered forks are all the rage now. Does anyone make a 29er HT frame that will work with a straight fork and QR wheels?
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  2. #2
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    Salsa timberjack. you can put a straight steerer fork in it with a spacer and get the qr alternator dropouts.
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  3. #3
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    There's a million used ones out there, cheap.

  4. #4
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    You can put a straight steerer tube fork in just about any frame with the right headset.

    I understand the desire to ride a simpler bike. Rigid fork, mechanical brakes, conservative geometry, longer stem / narrow bars, bar ends... sure. But why would you step backward in headset and axle technology ? That's silly.

    Look into Rivendell, Velo Orange, Jones Bikes, Soma, etc.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    But why would you step backward in headset and axle technology ? That's silly.

    Look into Rivendell, Velo Orange, Jones Bikes, Soma, etc.
    Because I like my existing fork and wheels. I am looking to do a frame swap..not get a whole new bike
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  6. #6
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    a lot of the frame that will work are going to be steel. (On One Inbred, Soma Juice, Surly Karate Monkey, Kona Unit?) how do you feel about that? what style of frame are you looking for? I would offer specific suggestions but I need more info from you.

    there should be TONS of frames that are more than five years old and will suit you just fine.

    again, you can put your old fork on any frame desinged for a "tapered" fork with the right heatset.

    also, what hubs do you have? you can probably convert your hub from 135x12 to 142x12. if you have hubs that can't be converted, perhaps it's time to upgrade to better hubs.
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  7. #7
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    The new Kona Unit uses QR axles and has a 44mm head tube with a strait steer fork. Available as frame only or complete.
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  8. #8
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    Right now the orbea that I have is a race bike that has very short chain stays, is very twitchy, and has significant toe overlap, ahs a low bb. I am 5 8. I'm looking for something with a little more relaxed geometry; something that's more of an all-around off road bike and that doesn't have the toe overlap situation. Currently, my front wheel is a stans with a sram X9 hub. My rear wheel is some fancy Easton race wheel. I'm not sure what brand The hub is but it is cone shaped with hatch marks on it. I don't think either can be converted to thru axle.

  9. #9
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    Just so we have something to compare it to, what specific model frame do you have?

    What do you mean by "more relaxed geometry"? XC race bikes usually have steep, conservative geometry.

    When you say it's twitchy, is that a problem at low speeds, technical terriain, climbing? Or is that more an issue when you're going fast, downhill, etc?

    It sounds like you're looking for a bike with different handling and geometry. Figure out what you want in that regard first, then find a way to make your parts work with a different frame.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Just so we have something to compare it to, what specific model frame do you have?

    What do you mean by "more relaxed geometry"? XC race bikes usually have steep, conservative geometry.

    When you say it's twitchy, is that a problem at low speeds, technical terriain, climbing? Or is that more an issue when you're going fast, downhill, etc?

    It sounds like you're looking for a bike with different handling and geometry. Figure out what you want in that regard first, then find a way to make your parts work with a different frame.
    The frame is an orbea alma Hydro 29er, size small. .16. The twitchiness it's a problem when taking Corners fast as the rear end constantly washes out on me. I also often wind up rubbing the front tire with my shoe when in technical terrain and moving the handlebars back and forth. I'm looking for something that is a bit more stable and allows me to have more of an upright riding position. Prior to the orbea, i had a first-generation Jabberwocky, but that was too big for me ( top tube too long) and handled like a Cadillac. The orbea is at the opposite end of the spectrum, and I would like something in between.
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  11. #11
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    What size Jabber did you have? I am 5'9" (just a hair under) and i had an old small 16" Jabber a few years ago. I now have a medium 18" Jabber and it fits me much better.

    The toe overlap is a major issue. Unless you are standing on your heels all the time, that should never happen. It really sounds like your frame is too small. You don't need a "more relaxed" frame, you need something that does not fit like a kids bike under you.

    Since you didn't post the model year of your Orbea, can you find the specific geo chart for that bike? What is the stack and reach, ETT, HTA, etc? This thread is pointless without that info.
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  12. #12
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  13. #13
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    can you post a photo of your current bike?

    the 16" bike in that geo chart has a 575mm effective top tube. that's pretty darn short for a rider who is 5'8". also, the chainstay at 439mm is not terribly short. a lot of modern trail bikes are a good inch shorter than that. it also has a very steep 71.5 degree head tube angle, which might feel twitchy depending on fork offset and your handlebar/stem setup.

    I am only a tiny bit taller than you and I has similar experiences when I rode a 16 Karate Monkey, which was close in size to that Orbea. most of the bikes I have owned that fit me have had effective top tubes closer to 600mm. my Jabber is longer than that because I wanted stability and a shorter stem. I don't need to get into stack and reach at this point, just know that you need a bike with a longer front-center measurement.

    I would definitely start looking at some medium frames. that will get the front tire away from your toes and get you more "in" the bike rather than "on top of" the bike.

    what's your budget? aside from the rear axle thing, you could make just about any frame fit your parts with the right headset, BB, and front derailleur.

    don't let the rear wheel thing be a dealbreaker. SRAM hubs are not that great. unless you put a ton of money into custom-building this bike with really nicep parts, consider selling it and buying a whole different bike that fits you better. no matter what you do, you're probably going to need to buy something different to make a frame swap work. do you have all the tools you need to do the swap, or are you going to have to pay a shop to do some/all of that?
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    can you post a photo of your current bike?

    do you have all the tools you need to do the swap, or are you going to have to pay a shop to do some/all of that?
    This is an older picture. I have since swapped to a short, inverted stem, wider bars, and no bar ends. The toe overlap is hard to see here, but when the wheel is straight and the pedals leveled, it is significant, even with the short cranks. I have had a few spills in technical terrain caused by that. I will see If I can find any better pics.

    As far as working on bikes, I have put together several myself. I am good with just about everything with 2010 era tech, except I don't face/chase/or install headsets on aluminum. Also, I stick with mechanical brakes.Anyone still make a 29er HT frame with straight fork and QRs?-13055428_1677453839186585_5609478402193101704_n.jpg

    Rear wheel is an Easton Haven. Race face cranks/stem. BB7 brakes. Bonty tires, Easton seatpost. Sram 1x9 drive train
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  15. #15
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    So yeah, you need a bigger frame that will work with most of your existing parts. What is your budget for that?

    Otherwise, you still have not answered my other questions. That bike has conservative, standard xc geometry and it's too small for you. What exactly do you want that would be different, other than more reach?

    A longer top tube is the best solution. A slack-er HTA might help too.

    Are you wanting another xc bike or are you interested in something more progressive?

    How much hassle are you willing to compromise before you cut your losses and buy a new bike?
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  16. #16
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    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    So yeah, you need a bigger frame that will work with most of your existing parts. What is your budget for that?

    Otherwise, you still have not answered my other questions. That bike has conservative, standard xc geometry and it's too small for you. What exactly do you want that would be different, other than more reach?

    A longer top tube is the best solution. A slack-er HTA might help too.

    Are you wanting another xc bike or are you interested in something more progressive?

    How much hassle are you willing to compromise before you cut your losses and buy a new bike?
    Budget for frame would be around 500-600 assuming most parts can transfer. For new bike, maybe $1400.

    As far as what I am looking for, as I indicated, something with a more relaxed geometry and that has a bit more stable ride. I ride almost exclusively midwest rocky, rooty singletrack, so I don't need anything approaching a gravity bike. Not interested in dual suspension.
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  18. #18
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    Define "relaxed." That is mostly subjective. You have a dated XC bike. The only thing more "relaxed," if you mean what I think you mean, is a granny beach cruiser.

    Your current frame does not have modern "aggressive" geo at all, so it should be fine except for the fact that it's probably too small for you. You likely feel cramped and shoehorned on top of the bike rather than "in" the bike because it's small. A longer bike will probably feel more stable.

    The honest truth is that "relaxed" and stable are subjective, so you will need to test ride some bikes and ride yours conscientiously to figure out what is off about it.

    There are a bazillion frames on the market that will do that for you. You might need to get a new axle, a headset crown race, and possibly a different bottom bracket.

    I suspect that all this will quickly add up to being not worth it when you can sell your bike and break even buying something newer that suits you better.
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  19. #19
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    We are using terms differently. By "relaxed" I mean riding position--i.e. more upright--something where I am not hunched over the stem and my weight is forward. The "modern geo" bikes I have demoed (Trek Roscoe/Surly Krampus) are more "relaxed" in that your weight is further back and you are steering the bike rather than riding/bucking on top of it.
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  20. #20
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    I see, when I hear "relaxed" i think that means riding more slowly on mellower trails, like something that would be more appropriate for a beach crusier.

    the short answer to part of your original question is: no, almost no one makes a modern frame that will easily and directly swap your old parts of. you'll need to make some compromises by changing the axle in your hub, your headset, maybe a seatpost. minor things, but it can be done. whether the time and expense of doing all that is worth it, in leiu of selling your bike and putting the fund toward a new one is up to do you.

    bikes with modern geometry are set up to be more stable at speed. they are not necessarily more "upright" and "relaxed" unless you set them up that way. so we still need to figure out what you're after. there is nothing radically "uptight" about your current frame.

    what about your riding style do you hope to change? are you wanting to ride bike parks with jumps and berms or be more comfortable over long distances? something else? if you want a more playful bike, you should look into bikes like the Salsa Timberjack, Canfield Yelli, or Kona Honzo. if you want a comfy all-day bike, you probably just need to tweak what you have now.

    it really sounds to me that your bike is just not set up to fit you and suit your riding style. from the photo, it looks like you have a long stem that is slammed on the headset with flat bars and bar ends. that's kind of an old school setup but it's apprently not working for you. I also still think your frame is just too small, and if you had the exact same frame one size up, it would be a different story. who set up the cockpit like that, you or a bike shop? have you tried a riser bar and a shorter, upright stem? how high are your grips relative to the top of the seat? (the real question should be: how high are your grips relative to the BB, but that's another story.)

    start with that- get your bars up higher. that's a cheap and easy fix for the short term. have you visited with a fitter? I am skeptical of "professional bike fitters" but some of them are really good. I have been watching a lot of this guy's videos lately and he's quite good- Home | Bike Fit Adviser

    the problem with buying a frame is that you probably can't ride the bike first. even if you can, you might need to play around with the handlebar position a lot on a test ride to figure out if it's really appropriate for you. you need to narrow down what aspect of the current bike is not working for you and go from there. in my own recent journey, i concluded that i needed a bike with a longer top tube, and when I did, I felt much, much more comfortable on the bike.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by skankingbiker View Post
    We are using terms differently. By "relaxed" I mean riding position--i.e. more upright--something where I am not hunched over the stem and my weight is forward. The "modern geo" bikes I have demoed (Trek Roscoe/Surly Krampus) are more "relaxed" in that your weight is further back and you are steering the bike rather than riding/bucking on top of it.
    It sounds like you would prefer something a little less "XC race" and a little more "trail". Old school XC geo is steep and twitchy, which can be fun but comes with tradeoffs. Something with a slightly higher HT (typically Trail or Endurance type of geo) and a slightly slacker HTA would be more stable and likely eliminate your tow overlap.

    Your rear wheel grip issue will likely be solved with a slightly more aggressive tire but there's a lot of variables, including technique. Shorter chainstays will offer slightly better climbing traction and get around corner better due to shorter wheelbase. Longer chainstays will be more stable at higher speed.

    I mentioned it earlier, but check out the Kona Unit.
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  22. #22
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    Bought the frame online based on geo numbers and recommended height/inseam. Everyone has been telling me my problem is i don't have enough weight over the front wheel and to LOWER my bars. As is, they are slightly higher than my seat. .. also, different from the pic, i now have a shorter stem, wider bars, and no bar ends. I originally went with the long stem due to frequent front wheel washout. ... in any event, i am likely selling due to the toe overlap.
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  23. #23
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    Can't really help with toe overlap, but based on a close friend's experience I can recommend the On-One Inbred 29" as a relaxed geo xc/trail ht.

    He switched from an Orbea Alma like yours because it felt too twitchy/racy and didn't give him confidence on techy situations. The On-one is a very different animal, with pretty "neutral" handling. It's at home on long XC rides but relaxed enough to tackle more technical trails. It was originaly designed for a 80mm fork, but I've only ridden it with a 100mm and I think it makes a great XC/trail allrounder. Frames are dirt cheap too, which is a bonus.

  24. #24
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    Thanks man. ...i too find the alma to be too twitchy and unstable..... considering on one or also niner emd among others
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by justwan naride View Post
    Can't really help with toe overlap, but based on a close friend's experience I can recommend the On-One Inbred 29" as a relaxed geo xc/trail ht.

    He switched from an Orbea Alma like yours because it felt too twitchy/racy and didn't give him confidence on techy situations. The On-one is a very different animal, with pretty "neutral" handling. It's at home on long XC rides but relaxed enough to tackle more technical trails. It was originaly designed for a 80mm fork, but I've only ridden it with a 100mm and I think it makes a great XC/trail allrounder. Frames are dirt cheap too, which is a bonus.

    So i am very torn between ordering an inbred to replace the alma or popping for a roscoe 27.5......The niggardly retrogrouch ethos in me really wants the inbred. ...cheap, durable, get to re-use most parts. .. and seems it is fit for an overweight casual rider.


    The trek is flashy, new, has the boost spacing, dropper post and is very playful. ....all of my bikes are self-built mediocre blue-collar builds..so i kind of want something "good."...


    If i do the inbred, i am not sure on sizing. I am right on the edge between a small and medium, 5 foot 9 in with a 30-inch inseam. But, based on my prior experience, I'm leery of doing a small bike in a 29er, and I'm leaning towards the 18 inch frame and just running a short stem
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  26. #26
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    I would go for the medium. I am the same height as you and rode small frames for years. Getting a medium was a revelation for me. A small frame will probably feel too low, put too much weight on the front tire, and result in the front tire toe overlap you're complaining about already. It would be a lateral move at best.
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