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  1. #1
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    Any way to add a rack onto a Access frame?

    Hi there, I have a Performance Access 9.7 2010, and I've been wanting to do some touring on it. It's a great bike, almost as fast as my carbon frame schwinn peloton on the road, so Im completely satisfied with it. I mostly use it with slick tires for commuting on the roads, and I sometimes go to the mountains for the trail riding and i just put on some treaded tires.

    But now that I'm considering doing some long distance backpack riding, I am thinking of getting a different bike for this just because the Access 2010 frame does not have the holes to put a rear rack on it. Is there any way I can drill some holes in it to put the rack in it or am I going to damage the integrity of the frame?

    I was considering buying this REI Novaro Matador:

    http://www.rei.com/product/807239

    What do you think about this? Do you think this would be better for long distance touring than my access 9.7, or are the parts a lot worse. Am I better off just buying the frame for the Matador and just moving all the parts from my Access 9.7 onto the matador frame?

    Also, separate topic but I just bought a book on a Lance Armstrong biking workout program that was on sale at Barnes and Noble and it said something that made me a bit sad, it said that aluminum frames are stiff and light but the disadvantage is that they will only last about 5 years before they break. Is this true, or is that only for road bikes? If I do get another bike, do I need to get a steel or titanium frame if I want something that will last much longer (20+ years?).

    Thank you all for the help.

  2. #2
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    check out the Freeload racks, they are perfect for bikepacking adventures and will work on ANY MTB, front or rear
    http://www.freeload.co.nz/

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the link, the only problem is it only supports 25 kg, that is only 12 pounds so that's not enough to hold enough gear for a long trek. The racks that bolt to the frame hold like 50 pounds i believe.

  4. #4
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    1. Seat clamp rack mounting: Here's one for $10

    2. DIY P-clamps and stainless bolts from the hardware store. Some of the p-clamps are rubberized so they'll grip the seat stays and not mar the paint. Like these
    Ah, these ones by Nitto look better than a hardware store cludge.

    3. Tubus makes a kit also: Seat stay mounting clamp bracket

    "Got everything you need?"

  5. #5
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    So these parts attach to the bike and they work as the holes I can bolt the seat into?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by grossen
    Thanks for the link, the only problem is it only supports 25 kg, that is only 12 pounds so that's not enough to hold enough gear for a long trek. The racks that bolt to the frame hold like 50 pounds i believe.
    The conversion is the other way, 12 kg is 55 libs

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by edsterra
    The conversion is the other way, 12 kg is 55 libs
    Oh yes i forgot, thank you for correction.

  8. #8
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    I believe the Access already has upper and lower eyelets (at least, mine did). A pair on the wishbone seatstay, and another down in the dropout.
    WTB: Specialized AWOL frameset, XL

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by seat_boy
    I believe the Access already has upper and lower eyelets (at least, mine did). A pair on the wishbone seatstay, and another down in the dropout.
    Mine too.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by seat_boy
    I believe the Access already has upper and lower eyelets (at least, mine did). A pair on the wishbone seatstay, and another down in the dropout.
    Mine too.
    I said, "Do you speak-a my language?" He just smiled and gave me a vegemite sandwich...

  11. #11
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    Okay I suppose there is eyelets in the dropouts, but I don't see any on the seatstay, are they hard to find?

  12. #12
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    Click on the thumbnail. I imagine yours is the same.
    I said, "Do you speak-a my language?" He just smiled and gave me a vegemite sandwich...

  13. #13
    Former Bike Wrench
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    Quote Originally Posted by seat_boy
    I believe the Access already has upper and lower eyelets (at least, mine did). A pair on the wishbone seatstay, and another down in the dropout.
    So did mine

  14. #14
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    Old Man Mountain racks work on about everything...

  15. #15
    dude with orange car
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    Quote Originally Posted by waterdude


    Click on the thumbnail. I imagine yours is the same.
    That's what my Access frame looks like. I've got a rack bolted to the frame right now, with panniers on the rack.
    This is no time for levity. - Oliver Hardy

  16. #16
    Trail Junkie
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    I actually built a bike rack for my Santa Cruz Blur a while back. I got everything from the hardware store with the exception of the actual bike rack. I used 1/8" aluminum strips that I drilled holes big enough for the skewers, and more that tied into the clam further up the seat stays that formed a "U" that the bike rack connected to. The rack was actually very strong, and I loaded close to 40lb onto with the panniers. I was concerned about the shock giving out because I tacked on an extra 60lb to my bike load but it took it. To top it off, my dad thought he would be clever and have a cool trailer. I ended up towing that as well for nearly all the climbing, but he just started mountain biking a few months before.

    If you are looking for a DIY for one, or for anything for that matter, check out www.instructables.com
    Santa Cruz Tallboy c
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