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  1. #1
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    2014 Kona Unit Newbie in need of pointers for build

    So I finally got a bike. Just in time for the season.

    It looks like a stock 2014 Kona Unit. The guy already converted to Tubeless. But it looks like the front is seeping a bit. Which I will be fixing soon. I might bring it into a shop to have them look it over too. Anyone know how much something like this would cost?

    I feel like I got this bike for a really good deal. I only ended up spending $375. So, that does allow me to have some free funds to do some upgrades.

    This is where I need your advice. There are three things I can think of that could be upgraded.

    1. Pedals
    2. Brakes
    3. New fork

    I think the Pedals would be a easy and very effective upgrade.
    The brakes are wired Avid BB7 "or 887". Do you think these would be better than a set of cheap hydraulic brakes? Or what would you recommend?
    Next would be the fork. I was thinking about going with a Carbon Fork. But after read about these bikes on here. It sounds like a 120-140mm Travel Suspension fork seems to be what people like.
    I did a quick search on Craigslist for some used ones. And I found a few pricing between $100-$200. When looking for a fork are there any fitment issues to be aware of?

    Depending on how much I end up spending I may only be able to afford getting Two of these options right away. If that's the case which of these three options would you consider the most important upgrade?

    Thanks
    I'll get a photo up soon

  2. #2
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    Photo's as promised.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2014 Kona Unit Newbie in need of pointers for build-20170502_163525.jpg  

    2014 Kona Unit Newbie in need of pointers for build-20170502_163545.jpg  

    2014 Kona Unit Newbie in need of pointers for build-20170502_163818.jpg  

    2014 Kona Unit Newbie in need of pointers for build-20170502_163918.jpg  

    2014 Kona Unit Newbie in need of pointers for build-20170502_163701.jpg  

    2014 Kona Unit Newbie in need of pointers for build-20170502_163736.jpg  

    2014 Kona Unit Newbie in need of pointers for build-20170502_163756.jpg  


  3. #3
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    Nice purchase, that's a really good price for a not too old Unit.

    A couple of things I can comment on as I have recently upgraded on my 2010 unit.

    Fork - if you plan on going suspension route I would recommend 100mm of travel. Going above this will adversely affect the frame geometry.

    Brakes - I recently replaced my bb7's with Clarks M2. They are a great budget hydraulic upgrade and a definite improvement. If you have the cash I'd recommend shimano SLX.

  4. #4
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    I'd leave it exactly as is and ride it.

    You didn't state what trails you plan on riding, because with a single speed you may want to or rather need to change the gearing.

    Nothing worse than charging up a mountain just to find out the gearing doesn't work for you.


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  5. #5
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    Good point. I will probably be spending most my time riding Hillside City Park in Elk River Minnesota.

    Its right next to me. But I dont know what kind of trails it has yet. Still getting the bike ready. Took it for a little ride in some woods near me and can say I can make it up 45 degree hill. But it took allot of effort and really took allot of energy out of me.

    Swapping gears might make it a little easier.

  6. #6
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    Riding single speed can be a compromise between being able to clear ascents easily, but then spinning out on the flats.

    It looks to be stock gearing which is 32 / 18, this is a pretty flexible ratio and I have found is spot on for most rides. However if I know the trail is fairly flat with no really big climbs, I swap out to a 36 chain ring.

  7. #7
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    Yeah the main thing I just want to avoid is making the gearing too low. I dont mind putting in more effort to climb hills if it means I can get a gearing with a little better speeds. As long as I'm not granny gearing everywhere I think I should be fine.

    Just based on the hills I just went on I think this gearing isn't so bad. Might just need to build up some stamina. It has been years sense I rode a bicycle after all.

    Definitely need new pedals! These things are terrible and very small. I'll have to find a set.

    Also went out and bought a Presta adapter for $2. So I can finally use my Compressor to inflate the tires. Will be needing a new Pressure gauge aswell tho. Only one that I have the fits the adapter only goes up to 20psi. Some do fit but are too high pressure. And the rest wont fit because the necks are too long.

    Also, would like to bring my wheels over to get balanced and trued. Anyone know how much this might cost if I remove the wheels before hand? Would that even save any money for bicycle wheels?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by OliSS View Post
    Riding single speed can be a compromise between being able to clear ascents easily, but then spinning out on the flats.

    It looks to be stock gearing which is 32 / 18, this is a pretty flexible ratio and I have found is spot on for most rides. However if I know the trail is fairly flat with no really big climbs, I swap out to a 36 chain ring.
    32 to a 36 is a HUGE jump in gearing.

    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    Yeah the main thing I just want to avoid is making the gearing too low. I dont mind putting in more effort to climb hills if it means I can get a gearing with a little better speeds. As long as I'm not granny gearing everywhere I think I should be fine.

    Just based on the hills I just went on I think this gearing isn't so bad. Might just need to build up some stamina. It has been years sense I rode a bicycle after all.

    Definitely need new pedals! These things are terrible and very small. I'll have to find a set.

    Also went out and bought a Presta adapter for $2. So I can finally use my Compressor to inflate the tires. Will be needing a new Pressure gauge aswell tho. Only one that I have the fits the adapter only goes up to 20psi. Some do fit but are too high pressure. And the rest wont fit because the necks are too long.

    Also, would like to bring my wheels over to get balanced and trued. Anyone know how much this might cost if I remove the wheels before hand? Would that even save any money for bicycle wheels?
    Shouldn't cost too much to have your wheels locked at and shouldn't cost more to have them on the bike compared to bringing them in

    I'd ride the bike for a while the way it is to get a feel for it and if it's something you like ridged or if you really need a suspension fork.
    Most people with a ridged fork run a plus side front tire.

    Your gearing will mainly be based on how your fitness level is and the trails you ride
    If geared 32x18 is a good all around gearing. 45* climb isn't bad whats the grade %?

    Around here your average SS runs 32x18 or 32x19, or 34x19.

    Brakes, I'd upgrade to some Shimano XT's or SLX's at minimum

    Nice deal on the bike though
    Too Many .

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by brent701 View Post
    32 to a 36 is a HUGE jump in gearing.
    It seems massive, but it only increases my speed at a cadence of 60 by 1.9km/h.

    Definitely worth it on flowing and flat single track.

  10. #10
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    I found this on Craigslist

    https://minneapolis.craigslist.org/w...053058076.html

    Would this be a good fit for the Kona?

    What do you think a good price would be if I go for it?

  11. #11
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    Just a FYI, it's easy to convert a Unit to a geared bike. I'd try the rigid fork for a bit. Looks like you would need a straight steerer tube.
    BB7's are good brakes, give them a try. If you decide against them, go Shimano hydro.

  12. #12
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    A couple of pieces of advice- grab a sixer of decent beer, and head to a local shop that you've heard good things about that's relatively close to you. Let them know your situation, and pay them to true your wheels and adjust your brakes, and buy a set of good Fixation (or similar) platform pedals.
    The beer is your offering to the mechanics, because what you're doing now is building a relationship.
    Save your money for stuff like a helmet, shorts, etc., just start racking up miles.
    One of the big benefits of this new relationship with a shop is to get invited on rides. Absolutely nothing you can buy will be worth more than what you'll learn from riding with more experienced people.

    Los
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  13. #13
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    Would you recommend those Fyxation Mesa pedals over RaceFace Chester?

    Allot of people have been recommending RaceFace to me.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    Would you recommend those Fyxation Mesa pedals over RaceFace Chester?

    Allot of people have been recommending RaceFace to me.
    Either will be a huge improvement. I have a pair of Mesas on my fat bike, I haven't ridden the Chesters.
    If you don't have some skate shoes, you might consider checking Five Ten's website for their close outs.
    You're gonna want to just get out and start riding!

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  15. #15
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    Already have. Not doing anything major yet. Just getting used to riding it. I am bringing the bike in to get the tires balanced and trued.

    Than with a good set of pedals I will be all set to take it on some more extreme stuff.

    Until they get in. I will just continue to take it out once a day for a little ride.
    The gearing doesn't so much bother me anymore. As long as I stay away from steep hills.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    Already have. Not doing anything major yet. Just getting used to riding it. I am bringing the bike in to get the tires balanced and trued.

    Than with a good set of pedals I will be all set to take it on some more extreme stuff.

    Until they get in. I will just continue to take it out once a day for a little ride.
    The gearing doesn't so much bother me anymore. As long as I stay away from steep hills.
    You're doing it right.

    Los
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  17. #17
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    So the bikes out getting serviced. Looks like it just needed the rear wheel trued and the front re-sealed. Costed me $35. Which I think is a good rate. Considering some shops were asking a minimum of $50 just to look at it.

    Anyways, Still looking for a decent set of pedals with out having to pay too much. The shop showed me some 45Nrth Heiruspecs pedals that looked nice but area little more than I would like to spend.

    Other than these 3 "45North, RaceFace, Fyxatio". What would you recommend looking at? Does anyone know if any company makes a really good flat platform steel pedal?

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  19. #19
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    Jesus Pedals are confusing.

    Well now I am looking at DMR New V8's.

    And Kona's own Wah Wah pedals. But I cant seem to find any. I hear they are good and affordable though.

    Basically I am looking for the best pedals I can get for less than $60. I mainly just want something strong, reliable and good grip. Not too concerned about lightness.

    And I still cant find any good steel ones ether.

  20. #20
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    I have been running these for 2 1/2 years now. Nukeproof Neutron EVO (Electron EVO) Flat Pedals | Chain Reaction Cycles
    I like them better than the Chesters as the platform is larger. I do have size 13 feet. They are extremely grippy.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    Jesus Pedals are confusing.

    Well now I am looking at DMR New V8's.

    And Kona's own Wah Wah pedals. But I cant seem to find any. I hear they are good and affordable though.

    Basically I am looking for the best pedals I can get for less than $60. I mainly just want something strong, reliable and good grip. Not too concerned about lightness.

    And I still cant find any good steel ones ether.
    DMRs are solid. Keep in mind- you're not looking for steel. You're looking for either aluminum or plastic bodies. While you might be thinking that plastic bodied pedals are just cheaply made, take off quality, many pedals like the Chester are durable, and well made.

    Los
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by sslos View Post
    DMRs are solid. Keep in mind- you're not looking for steel. You're looking for either aluminum or plastic bodies. While you might be thinking that plastic bodied pedals are just cheaply made, take off quality, many pedals like the Chester are durable, and well made.

    Los
    This^^^ and they really aren't just "plastic" per say... They are a composite material that uses plastics but are still incredibly durable. There are a few other companies that are putting out new composite pedals this year like Kona and Deity (both putting out composite versions of their popular magnesium pedals). DMR are great so you can't go wrong but read really good things about the Chesters too. I currently am running a knock-off version of the Xpedo Spry on my trail bike and Wellgo MG-1 on my commuter full rigid 29er. Both are great for what they are.

    And I agree with the others, keep the BB7s and try them out. I have had mine on my hardtail for 7yrs and have never had an issue with them. Depending on how used the bike was you may want to invest in new pads and new brake cables (have the shop do). As for the rigid vs. suspension fork, you have a 1 1/8 STRAIGHT STEERER fork so that will somewhat limit you abilities, the Manitou Marvel you showed is a great fork but tapered so it wont fit your bike. You will need to run a 100mm fork (may be able to get away with 120mm) if you want suspension but that depends on your riding style, terrain, etc. You could get away with the rigid but the suspension may save your arms and teeth. Try it for a bit and see what you think. I would probably invest in some nice, fat tires for your terrain first and then start looking at the suspension if that does not ease up the feel.

  23. #23
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    That frame uses a 44mm steerer tube, it can accept a tapered fork if you change out the lower headset cup. You would need an external cup, the current fork is a straight steerer with an internal cup. Keep in mind that the new headset will add about 12mm to the headtube so a 100mm fork really would be the max for that frame.
    Also you got a sweet deal on that bike, have fun!

  24. #24
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    I would stick with the full rigid setup for the moment and see. Then, if you really need to you can upgrade to a suspension fork. All depends on how rowdy you want to get and how much body punishment you are willing to take.

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    You can take your unit into many directions
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2014 Kona Unit Newbie in need of pointers for build-img_9684-.jpg  

    2014 Kona Unit Newbie in need of pointers for build-20161210_134139.jpg  


  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krish View Post
    You can take your unit into many directions
    Agreed, it's a really flexible frame. I've done the SS thing in multiple configurations, thinking 1x next.




  27. #27
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    Anyone know anything about Origin8 pedals? Are they any good?

    I was looking at their website and I really like the Citadel and RAZR.

    The main thing about these is that not only do they look really solid but are cheap too. Just a quick look and I found a set of the Citadel's for $60 which is right in my price range.

    But being that they are cheap. Does that mean they are no good?

    Sorry for being so focused on these pedals at the moment. The more I ride the more and more I cant stand the ones on the bike. I really need new ones. But the more research i do I uncover more and more brands. So its gets a little out of control for me.

  28. #28
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    2014 Kona Unit Newbie in need of pointers for build

    I'd get these if your looking for cheap quality pedals http://m.outdoorgearlab.com/reviews/...onents-vp-vice

    $45 from amazon

  29. #29
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    Those actually look really good!

    Exactly what I am looking for!

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by OliSS View Post
    I'd get these if your looking for cheap quality pedals VP Components VP-Vice Review | OutdoorGearLab

    $45 from amazon
    Those do look really nice! The main thing you have to worry about with "cheaper" flats is the bearings or bushings that are in the pedal. It really depends on how well they are put together and how long they will last.. My knock-off Xpedo Spry are pretty nice, lightweight, good contact patch but the bearings squeak like crazy. No slop or wobble developed in them yet. Where as my Wellgo MG-1 have been FLAWLESS for years, though they are on the thicker side.

  31. #31
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    VP components get pretty good reviews for durability and quality. I ran a VP bottom bracket for 3 years with no issues.

  32. #32
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    So I've been taking the bike out regularly. Today was the first day I tried the trip on bike to the trail. Took maybe 15min-20mins to get there. Wasn't too bad. Still had enough steam to do a short trail.

    So far this is what I have learned. Hills with rocks and branches are the enemy. They were very tough for me to get up with out stopping. And by the time I was done. I lost almost all my energy. But I still managed to make it back.

    I would also like to ask your opinion on positioning. Where should me arms and legs be located while riding. Like when I am at the bottom of my pedal stroke. Where should my leg be? Should it be completely straight or bent slightly. I may need to adjust the seat a little to tweek my positioning. Also, How to I prevent my arm from locking straight. I am pretty sure my Arms should be looser. Like while riding motorcycles.

    Thanks for all the help

  33. #33
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    I rode BB7s for years. awesome brakes. compressionless cable housing really helps them work better though. trip those cable ends- you don't want one of those getting sucked into the rotor. unlikely but better to be safe.

    hills with rocks and branches are NOT the enemy. they are a challenge that make riding fun. the first time you clean one of those spots like a boss, the feeling is incredible.
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    So I've been taking the bike out regularly. Today was the first day I tried the trip on bike to the trail. Took maybe 15min-20mins to get there. Wasn't too bad. Still had enough steam to do a short trail.

    So far this is what I have learned. Hills with rocks and branches are the enemy. They were very tough for me to get up with out stopping. And by the time I was done. I lost almost all my energy. But I still managed to make it back.

    I would also like to ask your opinion on positioning. Where should me arms and legs be located while riding. Like when I am at the bottom of my pedal stroke. Where should my leg be? Should it be completely straight or bent slightly. I may need to adjust the seat a little to tweek my positioning. Also, How to I prevent my arm from locking straight. I am pretty sure my Arms should be looser. Like while riding motorcycles.

    Thanks for all the help
    Like @ledelmo said, rocks, trees and branches are nothing more than a challenge that will make you better. There are plenty of spots that I have had to challenge myself to clean and even after being able to clean them semi-regularly, then trying different lines or keeping longer endurance after the clean... "It doesn't get any easier, you just get better."

    Knee position for pedal stroke should be with your knee slightly bent (think like a couple degree angle, not quite locked out, with the knee directly over the pedal axle. I have heard of guys that are able to get this proper position by sitting on the bike backwards and putting their heels on the pedal and then extending the leg to full extension but not lock. Look on Youtube for plenty of tutorials about knee/leg/saddle position.

    For arms and upper body, with a fully rigid your arms take over as the suspension so to speak. So yes you want the elbows bent slightly and ready to absorb impact. The arms should be absorbing the impact, not your hands, so if your hands are feeling numb or hurting then you are probably not loose enough up top.

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    Yeah, finding the right lines isn't really a problem for me. I did ride Endruo for years on my Dirt bike before.

    Its not the flats or down hill descents over rocks, roots, and holes. Its climbing up hills with them. That is giving me problem. I am still working on building my stamina. I am trying to get used to the bike enough where I dont have to expend too much energy too early.

    Conserving energy seems to be the key thing when riding a SS. And right now riding up hill with roots and rocks is zapping me of that energy big time.

    So, I am just going to keep riding. And look up some videos on getting the fit on my bike perfect for me. The more I ride the better I should get.

    Trying to get to the point where I can ride to the trail spend a hr or two on them and ride back without over straining myself.

    That way when I go riding with my friends I hopefully will be able to keep up with them without slowing them down.

  36. #36
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    a few things might help your climbing abilities:
    1. time in the saddle. just ride more, strength and skill come with time.
    2. tire pressure- if it's too high, you could be losing traction
    3. bike/body position- not a good question to ask the internet, but saddle and handlebar position adjustments can make or break a ride.
    4. gearing. I ride singlespeed 99% of the time. on my local trails, I could not ride a 32/18 gear. I tried 32/19 and it was still too steep for me. 32/20 or 34/21 is the sweet spot. gear your bike so you can make most climbs and work on your strength and technique from there.

    spend some time in the singlespeed forum. some videos of other people riding SS might be helpful to study technique. Singlespeed Videos...
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    Hey again guys, Been enjoying the weather.

    Whats some more recommendations for a few concerns I've been having.

    1. Can anyone recommend a bike pump to attach to the bike? Would prefer one with a gauge and Schrader compatible.

    2. How do you attach a spare tube to your bike?

    3. What do you all use to deter theft?

    Thanks again. Been enjoying the bike so far.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    Hey again guys, Been enjoying the weather.

    Whats some more recommendations for a few concerns I've been having.

    1. Can anyone recommend a bike pump to attach to the bike? Would prefer one with a gauge and Schrader compatible.

    2. How do you attach a spare tube to your bike?

    3. What do you all use to deter theft?

    Thanks again. Been enjoying the bike so far.
    1.. Time to convert to tubeless. No need then to carry around a pump, if you insist on the pump then get a small CO2 cartridge style one that will let you meter how much of the cartridge you use. There are those out there that once you break the seal the entire cartridge is released. Spend that little bit of extra for one that has the ability to slow and shutoff the flow. As for a gauge, just get used to the "feel" of what is "about right" for how you ride.

    2... Personal preference here but you can tape one in the corner where the top tube and downtube meet at the head tube, ziptie one under you seat rails, or get a small saddle bag that can carry a spare tube, couple levers and the CO2 setup.

    3... Are you talking at like the office? The grocery store? Where? I would recommend something real heavy duty cable wise that is long enough to go through your rear wheel, chainstay and upper part of the frame and still lock to a post that is a bike or two deep. There was once a great video, on youtube, from a NYC bike messenger coalition on the proper locking up of bikes. But they lock down everything that CAN be removed with pretty standard tools.

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    The bikes tubeless already but I was told to carry a spare with me at all times. Just in case. That way I wouldn't be stranded with a flat I couldn't fix. But instead just put the tube back in. But, I am not sure how that works considering you would have to remove the tubeless stem as-well to get the new tube in.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    I am not sure how that works considering you would have to remove the tubeless stem as-well to get the new tube in.
    it's simple. you remove the tubeless valve (it's basically the same as a inner tube's valve, except it has a thick rubber block on the end instead of a whole tube), put the valve in your pocket or backpack, install the replacement tube as you normally would, pump it up and ride. it will be messy, as there will be sealant all over the inside of the tire, but the tube will still function just fine.

    fix your tire, if you can, when you get home and re-install tubeless.

    I am a big fan of tire plugs. a few companies make tire plugs specifically for tubeless mountain bike tubes and they only cost a few bucks.
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    1. Can anyone recommend a bike pump to attach to the bike? Would prefer one with a gauge and Schrader compatible.
    2. How do you attach a spare tube to your bike?
    3. What do you all use to deter theft?
    1. I like my Lezyne Alloy Drive. It comes with a frame mount, but that leaves it exposed to dust and mud. I usually keep mine in my pack. you probably don't need a pressure gauge for on-the-fly fixes. I sometimes carry a SKS digital gauge in my bag though.

    2. You can wrap the tube in plastic wrap and tape it to your frame wherever is comvenient. a bag under your saddle is probably the best place. still, I carry one in my backpack, which I wear 99% of the time when I ride. it's hot here in Texas, so you need to carry more than one liter of water if you want to make it back home, even for a short ride.

    3. don't leave your bike in stupid, vulnerable places: apartment balcony, any bike rack overnight or for long periods of time, strapped to the back of your car when you're not driving. ANYWHERE someone can grab it and ride off, even if you're only more than arm's distance from your bike for "just a minute." it takes a theif 5 seconds to ride away on an unlocked bike, and less than one minute for a locked one if they have the right tools. keep your bike inside your home when you're not riding it. for more on locks, to read up on the subject in the Commuting sub-forum.
    Thorn in your Sidewall
    Vassago Jabberwocky

  42. #42
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    I ordered another set of pedals. I found a new set of Kona Wah Wah's for $50!

  43. #43
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    Hey. Check Shimano m615 brake. Very good brakes for the money

    Sent from my EVA-L09 using Tapatalk

  44. #44
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    I haven't been having any problems with the brakes. So for now they seem fine.

    I got the bike fitted to me as best as I could to my understanding as to how it should be. And it has been riding just fine for me the way it is set-up. But I am surprised its a LG frame and I got the pedals right where they should be. But it makes my seat seem really high. I can BARELY touch the ground on my tip toes.

    Something I have been wondering though is whether or not my 29" wheel are making climbing more difficult being that it's a SS.

    It seems like I must always be standing while climbing and its taking allot of my energy.

    Its defiantly giving me some good exercise.

    But I am feeling like I would like to have some gears now. So not only could I climb easier but also maintain higher speeds.

    I haven't put too much thought into it yet though. I am going to finish the season as it is and see how much farther I want to end up going.

    If I DO decide to go gears. I could just as easily convert the Unit. Or turn the Unit into more of a around town bike with some different tires.

    Than go buy another bike for more serious riding on the trails. Thinking Surly Instigator 2.0.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    ... I got the pedals right where they should be. But it makes my seat seem really high. I can BARELY touch the ground on my tip toes.
    sounds like you saddle is at the right height. for any mountain bike, if you can get much closer than getting your toes on the ground while seated, you have the saddle too low.


    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    It seems like I must always be standing while climbing and its taking allot of my energy.
    yup, welcome to the world of single-speeding! if you're sitting and pedaling on a singlespeed bike, you're doing it wrong.

    29ers and SS are a great combo. loads of traction and the larger wheels roll over stuff more easily than smaller wheels, which makes it easier to maintain momentum. SS riding is ALL ABOUT momentum.


    Quote Originally Posted by LeDelmo View Post
    But I am feeling like I would like to have some gears now. So not only could I climb easier but also maintain higher speeds.
    no shame in that. my local terrain is very difficult and I would rather ride SS. I have a 1x10 drivetrain right now while I am recovering from some back pain and trying to dial in my bike fit. I'll be back on the SS drivetrain eventually but most mortals want gears sometimes. you can buy a kit with a wide-range cassette, chain, shifter, and rear derailleur for relatively cheap if you look around a bit.
    Thorn in your Sidewall
    Vassago Jabberwocky

  46. #46
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    I've just gone 1x and pretty happy with it as I can now clear many climbs that would have left me walking when running SS.

    Shifter, cassette, cables, derailleur and hanger cost me about $250 AU. The new wheelset was the most expensive upgrade, but you may be able to pick something up second hand on the cheap.

    I definitely don't regret the decision but I did enjoy the simplicity of SS.

  47. #47
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    Can anyone recommend a comfortable seat and maybe a good set of gloves?

    Last week I did 30 miles and it really took a toll on me. The seat was a serious pain.

    I also ended up tearing up my MX gloves aswell. Not sure how or why they tore up. You wouldn't think these grips would be much different than a MX bike.

    Also, a little side story. Just today I was out riding and I have to ride on the side of the roads here. And a truck pushed me out to the curb. I ended up scuffing my new Kona pedals. Was really disappointed. I knew they were going to get messed up eventually but not like this...

    The guy just was way to close to me.

    Also how many miles do you guys usually ride? And do you think I am crazy for riding in steel toe boots? "Friends look at me like I am nuts"

  48. #48
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    Saddle all comes down to personal preference as everyone's sit bones are different. I have found that the CHARGE SPOON has been the best saddle for me and is relatively cheap at around $40. Check with your LBS as WTB, SDG and Ergon all have saddle demo programs where you can "rent" a saddle to see if it fits you properly or have fit stations to figure out which fits you the best.

    Gloves are another personal thing as they really depend on how much padding you want, do you want armor, full finger vs. half, etc. I used to hate thin gloves but this year I found TASCO MTB and their gloves have been phenomenal in the last month or so I have been riding with them. Super breathable, light, just enough padding and comfortable. Normally I like GIRO brand gloves though as they fit me the best, their DND series seems to be the most liked and best value..

    As for mileage, really depends on weather and schedule for me. I really try to do about 30 miles a week if not more as my normal ride is anywhere from 10-15 miles. But when I have the chance I ride more, like a recent vacation to Colorado where I did over 50 miles in the week of "tracked" rides, then yesterday I did 25 miles in Lake Tahoe. So really it varies.

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