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  1. #1
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    2011RIP 9 v. 2011 Fisher HIFI PRO 29

    Let me preface this by saying I am not an expert. I have ridden moderately over the last 10 years on a hard tail and now I ride a new Fisher HIFI Pro 29er. I love the bike. I ride in Michigan, but am moving to Denver later this year. I was going to get a RIP but I couldn't find one in Michigan to demo. Of course, I didn't know it at the time, but there was one scheduled today. I already had the HIFI (which I got at a great price), but wanted to get out on a RIP. I rode a medium with a XO build. (I am 5'9", 173).

    The test grounds trail was pretty technical---lots of ups and downs, tight turns and switchbacks. Pretty slow course.

    I don't know how to break down the bikes like the folks do here because I do not understand the technical stuff all that much. I get on and ride, that's about it.

    For what it's worth I did end up liking my HIFI better. I was quicker on it and I just felt more in tune, especially climbing. The RIP had a heavier up front feeling. I am not sure how to describe that and I am not saying it was a bad thing. I felt like I could make quicker adjustments on my HIFI and I felt like I was too far forward on the RIP (maybe I could have tweaked the seat better). That might just be because I am more dialed in on my bike (which I have put about 180 miles on so far). Maybe it was just the difference between XC and Trail, that I am not all that familiar with. At a prior demo, I was on an Epic Comp 29er, the Stumpy FSR 29er and the Giant Anthem X 29er.

    These are all great bikes. I think I like the HIFI and the Giant of all the bikes I have been on so far, but I wouldn't be able to give the specifics as to why. I think if I were to have any one of these bikes handed to me for free I would just end up adapting to and loving that bike. I guess I just don't have enough hours on the different types.

    One thing I liked about the RIP was the handlebars, which I should have taken notice of the type and didn't. I just have the stock ones on my HIFI. Someone was telling me I should switch to a riser bar or something like that. I would appreciate some feedback on handlebars if anyone in the know has a moment.

    Also a quick plug for 1UP bike racks. The thing is just perfect, easy to use and worth every penny they charge.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    davidcarson48
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    I also own a HiFi Pro. I ditched the bar for a 690mm width with 30mm rise (Bontrager Race Light Riser; the dealer swapped at time of purchase) as I needed to get the front end up a little more.

    If you don't need that, pretty much any 685-700 flat bar with standard sweep should be an improvement if you liked the Niner bar on the RIP.

  3. #3
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    Rip9 would be more comparable to Rumblefish. Hifi is in the same category as Jet9. That could explain the nimbleness of hifi compare to rip9.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by shodan22 View Post
    I was going to get a RIP but I couldn't find one in Michigan to demo. Of course, I didn't know it at the time, but there was one scheduled today.
    The same demo truck will be at Stony Creek Metropark tomorrow, from 10am-3pm. KLM Cycle and Fitness is the host.

  5. #5
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    The test grounds trail was pretty technical---lots of ups and downs, tight turns and switchbacks. Pretty slow course.
    That does not sound technical to me. You need ledges, sharp rocks, off camber, drops...

    The RIP is a great trail bike and can take on quite a bit more than the hi-fi in terms of technical stuff. Like someone said, it is more like a Rumblefish, and the Jet 9 is more like the hi-fi. All these bike are good, it really comes down to personal preference and what type of trail you frequent...

  6. #6
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    I like my RIP. Having fun in the chunky stuff. I can pick my way through it with my rigid but I can blast and pick with the RIP.

  7. #7
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    I agree. I guess I am starting to learn the feel of the difference between XC and trail bikes. I will likely always stay more of an intermediate rider than advanced now that I am hitting some harder trails (by Michigan standards which means CO will kick my butt). I am fit to climb, and pedal pedal pedal but not so skilled on the real tough stuff. That doesn't bother me but it suggests to me that even in CO, I might prefer the XC bike on more of an intermediate type course.

    Or, on the other hand, I need another bike

  8. #8
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    No matter what anybody says, or what the marketing hype is, there is nothing better than doing test rides, which you did. If you think you gave them both a fair chance, then you already know the right answer for yourself.
    even in CO, I might prefer the XC bike on more of an intermediate type course.

    Even in Colorado, there is nothing wrong with preferring an XC bike, which I do. It's just a matter of priorities. Do you want quick handling and efficiency uphill, or do you prioritize high speed bashing of rocks on the downhills? Its always a compromise. Figure out what you like, and base your decision on your preferences and riding style, not the latest fashion. Whatever you choose, both those bikes I'm sure will do everything you want pretty well.

  9. #9
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    @steve---I think you hit it spot on, and I think the more bikes I get on the more I will learn what my true personal preferences are, especially when I get out to CO. When I get out there, I won't have time to travel too far from Denver to ride, so I may not hit the truly nasty stuff very often. I think either way, I am always more likely going to want to have better climbs because I don't go much like a bat out of hell on the flip side. I am a new dad and also study martial arts. My risk of injury tolerance is a constant sliding scale and martial arts comes first. I do love to ride though and am improving now that I am on the HIFI and am tackling tougher trails. It isn't CO, but Michigan has some good stuff, including

    Potawatomi
    8555 Silver Hill, Route 1, Pinckney, MI 48169

    which is supposed to be one of the best in the country. I haven't ridden it yet, but will this year.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by shodan22 View Post
    When I get out there, I won't have time to travel too far from Denver to ride, so I may not hit the truly nasty stuff very often.
    There is a wide variety of riding relatively close to Denver, including some "truly nasty stuff".

    I think either way, I am always more likely going to want to have better climbs because I don't go much like a bat out of hell on the flip side.
    That's how I am too. One thing about the front range riding is that almost all of it includes some pretty substantial climbing. Typically, trails that start right at the base of the mountains, around Golden for example, start with 1000-1500 ft elevation gain in the first 2-3 miles. My attitude, especially in the middle of those climbs, is "just get me up this son of a biotch"! I know that I will make it down, and it will be fun, on any bike I ride, but I don't want to be wasting any precious energy on the way up!

    But, as you know, bikes these days can be pretty light and efficient, and be decent bump eating downhill machines too. So the good news is whether you pick something more XC oriented or AM oriented, you'll probably love it and have a blast with it.

  11. #11
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    I am inclined to agree with you Steve. I climbed just fine on that RIP, but not as well as I did on my HIFI PRO. I didn't catch the weight of the RIP (XO build) but I know my HIFI is at around 27 pounds 12 ounces. I am really enjoying the HIFI, but I think I am one of those types that likes all kinds of nice bikes.

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