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  1. #1
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    2009 Slingshot Farmboy 29er W/Velocity Color

    Wanted to share photo of new Slingshot.
    The lime colored Blunt rims from Velocity match perfectly
    Will do a ride review when I get a few more miles on it
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    Nice! It's so cool that the Blunts come in so many colours now.

    Post some on-trail pics when you do your ride report, I just like to look at those bikes.

    C.
    I'm covered in beer.

  3. #3
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    u need to stop using the headtubes off 26" bikes
    #1 NORBA elite singlespeed racer 30-34 age group

  4. #4
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    I just don't get these bikes

    Never have.. How tight is that cable? It is a cable isn't it? Why? Or is a rod? And why have a top tub that is twice the size of a normal tube just to run a spindly rod as the down tube? I don't hate it just don't understand the purpose behind it.

  5. #5
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    Hey minor swing,

    Quote Originally Posted by minor swing
    Never have.. How tight is that cable? It is a cable isn't it? Why? Or is a rod? And why have a top tub that is twice the size of a normal tube just to run a spindly rod as the down tube? I don't hate it just don't understand the purpose behind it.
    Bro too funny, I was just looking at the picture of this bike and said to myself "I just don't get it" and than I scrooled down to read reply's only to find your " I just don't get this bike",I don't know just thought it was funny..FWIW even though I don't "Get" this bike (nor do I need to as it's not mine) I don't dis-like it just find it to B quite interesting...I love the green looks great...........Enjoy...........CF.

  6. #6
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    looks pretty cool. the color scheme goes well!

    how much toe/tire clearance do you have? doesn't look like a lot.

  7. #7
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    I have always liked these bikes. Never actually ridden one, but if I recall correctly the cable gives some give and added traction. Kind of an inchworm type thing. That is what I recall from a buddy who had one like 15 years ago.

  8. #8
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    I don't know about the dirt version, but there was a guy on my team in the early 90's who raced road on one. That was the scariest road bike I have ever seen. When you go through a corner in a crit and your wheels are taking 2 different lines through the corner, somethin' ain't right. We used to work extra hard to stay at the front of the pack just to avoid trying to follow the dude through corners!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by minor swing
    Never have.. How tight is that cable? It is a cable isn't it? Why? Or is a rod? And why have a top tub that is twice the size of a normal tube just to run a spindly rod as the down tube? I don't hate it just don't understand the purpose behind it.
    it's designed from the get-go as a sort of passive suspension, hence the fibre board at the back of the top tube which flexes vertically but not laterally, the cable run up to a high pressure spring and pulls on the spring, you adjust the cable/spring to adjust "frame tension".

    side benefit? full size, fully functional folding bike...
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  10. #10
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    I used to see a few of those at early 90's races...and did see one of their road bikes back then ,too.
    I remember riding one and that different ride it gave ( it had a rigid fork).
    figured they were long gone...along with a lot of odd stuff from back then.
    I saw the ad for one in MBA, Greenfish I think? I then saw one at a NH race last week and now this one.
    SlingShot is back...Alright! (just like the Back Street Boys)

  11. #11
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    I've been riding mine since late 2006. Great bike. The post regarding 'your wheels are taking 2 different lines through the corner' made me laugh. I've not seen or felt that happen while riding my farmboy. People with little experience imagine all sorts of things about the bike- I've heard "Oh yeah, I rode one of those things once, it felt like a clown bike. You could point the front wheel in one direction and the back wheel in another"
    Total hogwash.
    Anyway, it's a very smooth ride and for the most part, rides like a steel hard tail. The rear is reynolds 853 and the top tube "boom tube" is seven series Al. The 'sling-power' a.k.a. "Energy Return Bicycle" has actually been proven (?) to give back some power in the crank 'dead zone'. For me, it's not very noticeable. It is most noticeable out of the saddle and putting the hammer down. It does give an 'inch worm' feel but like I said, very subtle.

    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  12. #12
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    Intriguing to say the least. I saw one in a museum in Colorado Springs but have never actually ridden one. Look forward to a ride report.

  13. #13
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    always loved slingshot desgines... my aunt talked about them back in the early 90's...

    yours looks sweet with the green blunts
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  14. #14
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    I had a chance to ride a friend's 26er Slingshot back-to-back with my Karate Monkey. I think the Slingshot actually rode smoother than the KM. The Slingshot did take a bit to get used to the torsional flex, but once I was used to it I forgot about it and it caused no handling problems. His is early to mid 1990's; I hear the newer ones have better torsional rigidity. I had a lot of fun riding it and would not mind getting one someday. Oh, and for the record, both bikes were running rigid forks.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by minor swing
    Never have.. How tight is that cable? It is a cable isn't it? Why? Or is a rod? And why have a top tub that is twice the size of a normal tube just to run a spindly rod as the down tube? I don't hate it just don't understand the purpose behind it.
    Sling Shot explains on this page:
    http://www.slingshotbikes.com/technology/slingpower

    In every pedal rotation of a traditional bike design there is a "dead" portion in the power stroke where the rider is getting no benefit from the expended effort. With the Slingshot design, we have provided the most efficient use of pedal energy throughout the entire pedal revolution resulting in greater speed with the same expended energy. This difference is achieved as pedal energy is stored in the spring compression - then released at the "dead" portion of the pedal stroke, effectively increasing the length of the power stroke. Any energy not going directly to the rear wheel (forward power) is momentarily stored, returning 100% in the "dead" portion of the power stroke. This returned energy helps balance the power through the pedal stroke and reduces the effect of the dead spot. The net effect is what we call "Sling Power".
    Here are the components that allow for the stored energy - release.
    Buy products mentioned in this post: Roach Motels and Flowbee Hair Cutting System

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by finger51
    The post regarding 'your wheels are taking 2 different lines through the corner' made me laugh. I've not seen or felt that happen while riding my farmboy. People with little experience imagine all sorts of things about the bike- I've heard "Oh yeah, I rode one of those things once, it felt like a clown bike. You could point the front wheel in one direction and the back wheel in another"
    Total hogwash.
    Again, I'm not commenting on the MTB and I certainly don't begrudge anyone a bike they like, BUT I rode with that dude for several years and so did a lot of other people and I saw going through corners where the front and back wheels were following a completely different radius through turns. I can ask anyone else in those races and they would say the same. Maybe the dude somehow set his bike up to flex more, maybe the older road bikes from Slingshot were really flexy, I don't know. I do know that bike was freaking scary and we were lucky he was not strong enough to be in the pack the whole race so we didn't have to deal with his very sketchy lines.

    He had major back problems, so liked it because it was softer than a normal road bike, but DAMN, that thing was not meant for the fast handling of crit racing, fast and twisty downhills, etc.

  17. #17
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    So what happens if the cable snaps? That may be a silly question but I am curious. An interesting concept for sure.

  18. #18
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycleboy
    ...the front and back wheels were following a completely different radius through turns...
    Don't ALL bikes do that?

  19. #19
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    Not like this did!

    Edit - I'm trying to picture the physics here. On a bike w/ a normal frame, wouldn't the wheels follow the same line through the turn, EXCEPT if you have the bars turned? Take a bike, roll it in a straight line, the wheels follow each other. Take same bike, lean it to one side and roll it along and the wheels still follow one another. The faster you go, the less turning of the bars is done through a corner and the more lean angle controls where you go. Being that you would always have a slight turn in the bars, there will be some difference in the line between front and rear, but not a lot.

    The Slingshot though was like the front of the bike was leaning at 80 degrees and the back was at something else (like it twisted at the "hinge") and so the wheels were following completely different tracks aside from how much the bars were turned.
    Last edited by cycleboy; 06-11-2009 at 09:32 AM.

  20. #20
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    Slingshot Cable Breaking

    My understanding from Aaron at Slingshot it that cable breakage is rare to non-existent.
    The majority of breakages have occurred when a Slingshot rider got tangled up with an automobile.

  21. #21
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    While I would love to try out a slingshot, I fear I am too large and would fall into that rare cable breakage category. Or the fiber board.

  22. #22
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by larryo108
    While I would love to try out a slingshot, I fear I am too large and would fall into that rare cable breakage category. Or the fiber board.
    I was looking at the farmboy a while back... had the same question and they got back to me quickly...

    ME:
    hello

    I was wondering if there is a weight limit to your bike frames... specifically the farmboy... if so what is it?

    thanks
    mark
    reply:
    Hi Mark,

    Thank you for the inquiry. I would say the weight limit would be around 300lbs....Honestly we have had some very big riders on our bikes with no issues. Please let me know if I can answer any further questions. Thank you.

    Aaron Joppe
    International and Domestic Sales Manager
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  23. #23
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    I guess that you would have two years of a full warrantied factory frame to find out. Frame failure can occur on many "high quality" frames. We had a 2007 Gary Fisher Super Caliber 29er break at Moab this spring. Glad that GF stood behind their product, shipped out a new frame and paid for bike rental. Slingshot seems to have the same desire to provide good customer service although I have not had to test it yet.

  24. #24
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    Be sure to post pictures if it breaks and let us know how they take care of you.

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    Well that is good to know. I am 260#. I will keep this in mind for the future, since I already bought a Vassago and am in the midst of the build.

  26. #26
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycleboy
    Not like this did!

    Edit - I'm trying to picture the physics here. On a bike w/ a normal frame, wouldn't the wheels follow the same line through the turn, EXCEPT if you have the bars turned? Take a bike, roll it in a straight line, the wheels follow each other. Take same bike, lean it to one side and roll it along and the wheels still follow one another. The faster you go, the less turning of the bars is done through a corner and the more lean angle controls where you go. Being that you would always have a slight turn in the bars, there will be some difference in the line between front and rear, but not a lot.

    The Slingshot though was like the front of the bike was leaning at 80 degrees and the back was at something else (like it twisted at the "hinge") and so the wheels were following completely different tracks aside from how much the bars were turned.
    Try your experiment by rolling through a puddle of water then turning. Do it by actually riding rather than by walking the bike, so as to have a real situation.

    Is there one wet track or two? How far apart are they?

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Try your experiment by rolling through a puddle of water then turning. Do it by actually riding rather than by walking the bike, so as to have a real situation. Is there one wet track or two? How far apart are they?
    True but the Slingshot has to have wildly different wheelpaths from a bike with a real downtube.

    NOT BAGGING ON THE BIKE but I don't understand how those frames could have any lateral stiffness. Seems to me that there would be a ton of wasted energy and compromised control with the rear end twisting relative to the TT and HT/fork under the slightest side load.

    Slingshot owners - please describe your experience with this topic.
    Professional Amateur. Disagree? Submit your grievances here.

  28. #28
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soupboy
    True but the Slingshot has to have wildly different wheelpaths from a bike with a real downtube.
    How much different? Until someone measures it it's just an assumption that it's "wildly" different.

    I like the new avatar. He's scary.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    How much different? Until someone measures it it's just an assumption that it's "wildly" different. I like the new avatar. He's scary.
    Well, you're never going to get a number from anyone. Are you suggesting that one should assume they're not materially different? WTF would you lead you to think that? On top of no DT there is a flexible hinge in the TT.

    Instead, go saw the DT off of one of your bikes, tether the HT to the BB with an extension cord and go for a ride!

    C'mon Nat, you know better!
    Professional Amateur. Disagree? Submit your grievances here.

  30. #30
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soupboy
    Well, you're never going to get a number from anyone. Are you suggesting that one should assume they're not materially different? WTF would you lead you to think that? On top of no DT there is a flexible hinge in the TT.

    Instead, go saw the DT off of one of your bikes, tether the HT to the BB with an extension cord and go for a ride!

    C'mon Nat, you know better!
    The Slingshot founder's mini bike broke its downtube, and he discovered it rode really nicely all of the sudden contrary to what he assumed.

    I think this is one of those times when you have to just throw a leg over the bike and try it. Looking at a picture will only tell you what your brain wants to think.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Try your experiment by rolling through a puddle of water then turning. Do it by actually riding rather than by walking the bike, so as to have a real situation.

    Is there one wet track or two? How far apart are they?
    No need, I already know the result. There will be 2 and they'll be a couple inches apart.

    BUT, the faster you go, the less different they are because more of the cornering comes from the lean than from turning the bars. If you don't believe this, try turning your bars as sharply at 20 mph as you can safely at 5 mph. Make sure to put your helmet and body armor on first! Taking the same turn at 5 versus 20, you will turn the bars more at 5 and lean the bike more at 20.

    The Slingshot we used to race with would have different paths by a LOT. I can't tell you how much, but when you watch hundreds upon hundreds of standard bikes going through turns ahead of and around you and then you see this one, it was VERY different. If I knew how to contact my old teammates, I'm sure they'd agree.

    It was definitely a combination of flex in the plate and/or the cable. There is just no logical way it can be as stiff laterally as a diamond frame. Take a bike, flip it upside down, and try to twist it by pushing one wheel away and pulling the other towards. On a std frame you have the triangle created by the top, seat, down, and head tubes resisting the twist. On the SS frame you have the flex plate. There is little if any resistance offered by the cable (it's a cable after all, very strong in a lengthwise direction, very weak in a side to side direction). So virtually all of the twisting force has to be taken up by the flex plate. That's a lot of force in a tiny piece.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycleboy
    The Slingshot we used to race with would have different paths by a LOT. I can't tell you how much, but when you watch hundreds upon hundreds of standard bikes going through turns ahead of and around you and then you see this one, it was VERY different. If I knew how to contact my old teammates, I'm sure they'd agree.
    You're saying that it flexed so much that everyone could see the front end going at a different angle than the rear. I don't buy it, because the rider would have crashed in every turn. I think you guys all decided that you could see it and lo and behold, you saw it. Back in the mid 80's when an aluminum-tubed bike was a new and exciting thing, a group of Cat 3 racers I hung out with, who arguably saw as many bikes in a pack as you, swore up and down that they could see Cannondale's thin aluminum tubes flexing. They wanted to see it, so they convinced themselves that they did.

    Even if the Slingshot flexes more than a diamond frame, it's probably not to the degree that you're remembering.

  33. #33
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    this is awesome.. we've got one guy who insists that the further you lean your bike the less different a track the tires take form each other, and another guy who's insisting that a vertical flexure somehow "must" be horizontally weak...
    Neither of them is taking into account that the cable provides absolutely zero lateral strength, and the top tube/flexure design was obviously made to accomodate that.
    If you took a frame that WASN'T designed to compensate for those lateral forces and "just "attach a bungee cord" to it then of course it'd flop everywhere... but these frames aren't just being ridden, some are raced, and the fundamental design has remained rather unchanged for years, probably up to decades by now.

    So logic would dictate that this frame seems to have been designed to accomodate the single tube and it addresses the lateral strength issues therein.
    Because if either of you were right, the riders who've ridden these thinds for the last decade and change (2 decades maybe?) would be... ermm... dead from trail damage?
    Since their bungee cord'd non in-line wheel'd asses would've been bear food by now!

    Sometimes you don't have to understand something to agree that it obviously works.


    but your version's funnier!!
    continue!
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  34. #34
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    I have seen people complain about the front wheel being too close to the pedals. Is this the case on these bikes(perhaps just the smaller ones?) and if so what is a good fork that will give you the off set to over come this issue?

  35. #35
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    I rode one briefly in the 90s sometime. I can't say it was scary or anything, but it did have a unique feel to it. There was definitely something going on there that a typical bike did not do. What that was I am not sure.

    It would be very interesting to try it again.
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    You're saying that it flexed so much that everyone could see the front end going at a different angle than the rear. I don't buy it, because the rider would have crashed in every turn. I think you guys all decided that you could see it and lo and behold, you saw it. Back in the mid 80's when an aluminum-tubed bike was a new and exciting thing, a group of Cat 3 racers I hung out with, who arguably saw as many bikes in a pack as you, swore up and down that they could see Cannondale's thin aluminum tubes flexing. They wanted to see it, so they convinced themselves that they did.

    Even if the Slingshot flexes more than a diamond frame, it's probably not to the degree that you're remembering.
    Fine, don't buy it. I know what we saw and I know that bike handled very strangely and I know we all tried not to ride near the guy because of it.

    I just can't see how it is possible that the frame could be stiff laterally like a diamond frame. The cable offers nothing to resist lateral flex or twisting. That means ALL of that force has to be taken by that little plate thingy. Do people actually believe that the plate and the attachments holding it together don't flex/twist any more than a downtube that's welded at both ends? I'd love to see a computer sim of the stress that plate has to take when going through a turn.

    Whatever though. I'm glad the OP likes his bike and I'm not commenting on their MTB's at all. If you guys don't buy what I saw, then don't. I'll remind my riding buddy about the bike and we'll laugh over how scary it was and have another beer. Life goes on, enjoy the ride.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycleboy
    Fine, don't buy it. I know what we saw and I know that bike handled very strangely and I know we all tried not to ride near the guy because of it.

    I just can't see how it is possible that the frame could be stiff laterally like a diamond frame. The cable offers nothing to resist lateral flex or twisting. That means ALL of that force has to be taken by that little plate thingy. Do people actually believe that the plate and the attachments holding it together don't flex/twist any more than a downtube that's welded at both ends? I'd love to see a computer sim of the stress that plate has to take when going through a turn.

    Whatever though. I'm glad the OP likes his bike and I'm not commenting on their MTB's at all. If you guys don't buy what I saw, then don't. I'll remind my riding buddy about the bike and we'll laugh over how scary it was and have another beer. Life goes on, enjoy the ride.
    We had SlingShot's at the first Big Wheeled Ballyhoo for demo purposes and you could see the bikes flex somewhat. It is common for long time SlingShot owners to report that the wheels do track in different ways and that it is possible to "rear steer" the bike when you learn how to do it.

    Some people dig that, some don't, but it does flex in a way that is unique to any other bicycle out there.
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  38. #38
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    Cool bike.

    I seem to remember that a Slingshot was ridden to 2nd in the 24hr US Nats a few years ago, among other good race results on road and dirt over the ~2 decades the bikes have been around. Its a different design, but it seems t o be fully capable of kicking some &^% under a good rider

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    Smile First Ride 2009 Slingshot 29er

    Just around the parking lot. The bike feels 4-5 lbs lighter than my 07 Gary Fisher Super Caliber 29er. I'll have to take it down to the bike to confirm.

    The top tube and "dog bone" look beefier and meatier in real life. The workmanship on the frame/paint is outstanding. Looks like 3+ coats of clear (over the decals).

    I dropped the bike off at Ultimate Detail in Salem OR. They are going to use the 3m rock chip film to chip guard the frame and fork. $75 seems like a small price to pay to protect this beautiful machine.

    Plan to ride Black Rock in Fall City, OR on Wed to break it in. Should be able to get my buddy to video the entire downhill section. Will post video (if you can) or the link to it on You-Tube along with first impressions.

    I know that this bike may not be for everyone, but it fits my riding style and desire to ride something that you don't see every day.

    Will keep all believers and naysayers in the loop.
    Last edited by Sling Boy; 06-12-2009 at 10:46 PM.

  40. #40
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    Foot touched tire when right pedal was as far forward as possible and I was turning slowly and tightly to the left. My Gary Fisher did the same thing. 99% of the time if I'm taking a sharp left hand corner my right pedal is straight down not forward. I don't perceive that it will cause any problems after setting up the worse case scenario today in the parking lot. By the way my frame is a Small and I wear size 9 shoes.

  41. #41
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    Oddly enough, you can have an opportunity to try one out for yourselves as there is a Slingshot Farmboy frameset for sale in the mtbr classifieds for a killer price

    http://classifieds.mtbr.com/showprod...?product=35866
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fett
    Oddly enough, you can have an opportunity to try one out for yourselves as there is a Slingshot Farmboy frameset for sale in the mtbr classifieds for a killer price

    http://classifieds.mtbr.com/showprod...?product=35866
    and anyone who happens to be in SF CA who cares to take a spin on one can PM me- There is some fair singletrack in GG park that we could suss things out on.

    soilsaloon is only a couple of weeks away!

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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycleboy
    Again, I'm not commenting on the MTB and I certainly don't begrudge anyone a bike they like, BUT I rode with that dude for several years and so did a lot of other people and I saw going through corners where the front and back wheels were following a completely different radius through turns. I can ask anyone else in those races and they would say the same. Maybe the dude somehow set his bike up to flex more, maybe the older road bikes from Slingshot were really flexy, I don't know. I do know that bike was freaking scary and we were lucky he was not strong enough to be in the pack the whole race so we didn't have to deal with his very sketchy lines.

    He had major back problems, so liked it because it was softer than a normal road bike, but DAMN, that thing was not meant for the fast handling of crit racing, fast and twisty downhills, etc.
    Roadies are sooooooooooooooooooooooo narrow minded.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sling Boy
    Wanted to share photo of new Slingshot.
    The lime colored Blunt rims from Velocity match perfectly
    Will do a ride review when I get a few more miles on it

    Very nice. The rims compliment the frame quite nicely. Good job.
    I always wanted to ride a Slingshot, haven't had a chance...yet.
    The truth will set you free... But first it will piss you off

  45. #45
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    Looking forward to a ride report and some final figures on the weight of the build. I wonder how they would do in SS format?

  46. #46
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    i rode one for a few years. good ride, takes the edge off without going to all the associated headaches of suspension. never ridden the 29er, mine was 26. bike was HEAVY, if they could make it 25lbs, it would rock.

  47. #47
    Nat
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    Check it out:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  48. #48
    MONKEYMAN
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    Check it out:
    Wow, talk about a wheelbarrow! DUDE! Somebody stole your chainstays!
    “I don't like jail, they got the wrong kind of bars in there”

  49. #49
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    First Real Ride 09 Slingshot 29er Farmboy Fall City OR

    I've been ill with food poisoning for a week, lost 16lbs at one point, got dehydrated enough that I was in the hospital for three days on an IV.

    With that being said I was sure that there wasn't a bike on the planet that I could compare favorably with my old Fall City rides on my 07 Gary Fisher Super Caliber 29er. At least not in my current physical condition. Had to get on the bike, it's been in my office for 3 days with no ride.

    Well I was wrong. Rode for 2 1/2 hours broken down into:

    15 minute climb 1.2 miles 400 feet of elevation gain, gravel fire road**Verdict** Climbed more responsively and effortlessly than the GF. Still not sure if it weighs less (will check that tomorrow). No energy seemed to be wasted when I tried to accelerate sharply uphill. No wheelie pop which I had expected from the shorter wheelbase.

    Riding Teeter Totters / Balance Rails**Verdict** Wheel base is shorter which may have had something to do with it, but I was able to consistently ride a 20 foot totter both pedaling and coasting, in and out of the saddle, same went for the 30 foot balance beam section. I have never been able to do either of these twice in a row on the GF.

    Knee to Thigh Height Jumps in the Play Area**Verdict** Could not have been more surprised. I was very tentative. After all I was going from a full suspended GF with 2 1/2 inches of rear travel to 1 inch of voodoo magic rear travel. To give full credit the Fox 29er shock on the new Slingshot does have 20mm more travel than the GF. The departure from the ramp was predictable and forgiving, easily allowing needed corrections if I was coming in at an odd angle. The bike was very flick-able, was able to change positions easily in the air. The real shocker was the landings, Rather than the full suspension bottoming out (compressing all at once upon impact) feeling that I used to get it was butter. Every landing was smoother than anything I was ever able to pull off on the GF.

    Single Track**Verdict** Yes my foot rubbed on the tire 4 times at the beginning of my ride. After the first 30 minutes my foot didn't hit the tire again. All of these were cause my me not riding in a semi-straight line when I was starting from a standstill. None of the tire rubs occurred while I was jumping, balancing or riding single track, or climbing. The rub was really a light brush which never slowed my momentum or forward progress. I'm sorry to report to all of you un-believers that the front wheel does not track a different arch than the rear wheel. The tracking felt the same as my Trek 8000 hard-tail with a front shock, a fairly comparable ride.

    Over-all I could not have imagined being happier with the performance. For my riding style it is turning out to be the perfect bike.

  50. #50
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    Awesome photo. I don't know where or how you got it put it's classic.
    Dude is a serious ride.
    I'm going to call him Old Man Farmboy or Grandpa Sling Shot

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