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  1. #1
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    Who had a 29 er and now rides a 27.5 ?

    Looking at new bikes, Pivot or a Trek Fuel 9.7 and the Trek dealer has recommended going with a 27.5 with a wide tire. I am an older rider and looking for stability more than speed but have always had a 29 er.

    The most difficult trails I ride are only intermediate level trails so will I notice more difficulty riding over obstacles on a slightly smaller wheel and I guess climbing is virtually the same with each wheel size?

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    Went from 26er to 29er back in Jan '14. I am only 5'8" and can't put any/enough style into my jumps, or wheelie/manual as easy as a 26er. Just built a new 650b last week from all the Pre-Black Friday / 2017 Closeout sales. Budget sub $3k carbon build. First a 29er will smoke a 27.5 in a race, they roll too fast, carry more speed, and are more stable at speed. I did gain back my manuals and wheelies with the 27.5 but still working on the table top whips. I think in the end I will need both bikes, the 9er for long epics, highspeed flow rides, and crazy chunk (its length, rollover, and higher bb makes rock crawling easier). And the 27.5 for the local rides or at the bike park.

    Rickcin, if you switch, you will loose that stability and speed on a smaller wheel but gain maneuverability, especially on tight slow turns. I find climbing better on a 9er, more traction and more roll over, 9er gives up acceleration and maneuverability on a climb.

    The dealers wide tire recommendation is a good one if you are transitioning from a 29er. Last year I demo'd a Bronson on 2.35s and found it to be super squirrely compared to my 29er. This year i demo'd an Evil on 2.6wt and 35mm rims, super stable. Its one of the reasons i decided to build this bike.

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    Huge 29er fan and early adoptor. Wanted long travel so went 275. Both were great but 29er still won out for old fashioned trail riding.

    Then tried a 275 with 2.6" tires. Wow. Makes me not sure I want to go back to 29. If I were short I'd stay with the 275x2.6 for sure.

    I do like to keep 2 bikes running so will likley end up with a 275x2.6 and a 29. But if the 29 won't take 2.6" tires not sure I want the big hoops.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratt View Post
    Went from 26er to 29er back in Jan '14. I am only 5'8" and can't put any/enough style into my jumps, or wheelie/manual as easy as a 26er. Just built a new 650b last week from all the Pre-Black Friday / 2017 Closeout sales. Budget sub $3k carbon build. First a 29er will smoke a 27.5 in a race, they roll too fast, carry more speed, and are more stable at speed. I did gain back my manuals and wheelies with the 27.5 but still working on the table top whips. I think in the end I will need both bikes, the 9er for long epics, highspeed flow rides, and crazy chunk (its length, rollover, and higher bb makes rock crawling easier). And the 27.5 for the local rides or at the bike park.

    Rickcin, if you switch, you will loose that stability and speed on a smaller wheel but gain maneuverability, especially on tight slow turns. I find climbing better on a 9er, more traction and more roll over, 9er gives up acceleration and maneuverability on a climb.

    The dealers wide tire recommendation is a good one if you are transitioning from a 29er. Last year I demo'd a Bronson on 2.35s and found it to be super squirrely compared to my 29er. This year i demo'd an Evil on 2.6wt and 35mm rims, super stable. Its one of the reasons i decided to build this bike.
    Great explanation and analysis and I am certainly a fan of 29ers. Just recently, I have heard from several people, two riders and a bike shop manager that wide tires will really make a huge difference as far as being stable and more confident when riding. I would prefer riding a 29 er but would like to run wider tires. The Trek Fuel does come with 2.4's and they may be fine but I have to wonder how wide I could go if I did want to change out the tires?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Huge 29er fan and early adoptor. Wanted long travel so went 275. Both were great but 29er still won out for old fashioned trail riding.

    Then tried a 275 with 2.6" tires. Wow. Makes me not sure I want to go back to 29. If I were short I'd stay with the 275x2.6 for sure.

    I do like to keep 2 bikes running so will likley end up with a 275x2.6 and a 29. But if the 29 won't take 2.6" tires not sure I want the big hoops.
    i guess I need to find out how wide a tire I could run on tbe Trek Fuel!

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    i guess I need to find out how wide a tire I could run on tbe Trek Fuel!
    I have a 2017 EX-8 27.5+. I ride 2.8 Rekons on 40 mm rims and love it! Haven't tried converting it to a 29er. I'm only 5'4" and don't race so I'm good the way it is for technical single track.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Evil View Post
    I have a 2017 EX-8 27.5+. I ride 2.8 Rekons on 40 mm rims and love it! Haven't tried converting it to a 29er. I'm only 5'4" and don't race so I'm good the way it is for technical single track.
    A 29 er is better suited for a taller rider and I would prefer staying with a 29 er but want the ability to run 2.6 tires if desired.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    A 29 er is better suited for a taller rider and I would prefer staying with a 29 er but want the ability to run 2.6 tires if desired.
    This year I switched out my 29er from 2.5s on 30mm id rims to 2.35s. the 2.5s made the bike very sluggish to steering inputs. With 2.35s I feel like I can slash the bike around. Of course this may have to do with my height and I can't apply enough leverage to the bike.

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    Perhaps I'm over thinking this and I should just wait until I demo tbe bike to determine how the stock 2.4 tires work for me. They might be just perfect for me and I would have no reason to look for a wider tire. Thanks

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    I own and ride both, but prefer 27.5. The 27.5 seems more fun and definitely is quicker. The 29er is faster in some situations where a lot of chunk is present. Don't be fooled though, my 27.5, with 2.4 tires handles everything real good too, almost as to where I want to get rid of the29er, which seems to collect more dust in garage then on the trail for the last year or so.. Btw, I'm 6', 175lbs, so I fit not bikes equal.
    EXODUX Jeff

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hurricane Jeff View Post
    I own and ride both, but prefer 27.5. The 27.5 seems more fun and definitely is quicker. The 29er is faster in some situations where a lot of chunk is present. Don't be fooled though, my 27.5, with 2.4 tires handles everything real good too, almost as to where I want to get rid of the29er, which seems to collect more dust in garage then on the trail for the last year or so.. Btw, I'm 6', 175lbs, so I fit not bikes equal.
    Looking for exactly what you've mentioned, more fun! I am not a racer or one who does technical trails. I just want to have fun, move at a moderate pace and have a bike test offers stability.
    The Trek Fuel is available with either wheel size with a 2.4 wide tire. I think I will demo the 275 first since I own a 29 er and think my first impression between the two bikes will be the deciding factor. If doubtful after the ride, I will demo again with the 29 wheelset.

    Another possibility is to go with the 275 and just hang onto my 29er but hate to have a bike that seldom gets used.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Perhaps I'm over thinking this and I should just wait until I demo tbe bike to determine how the stock 2.4 tires work for me. They might be just perfect for me and I would have no reason to look for a wider tire. Thanks
    Demo a Trek Stache 29+ (3Ē). I think youíll love it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Looking for exactly what you've mentioned, more fun! I am not a racer or one who does technical trails. I just want to have fun, move at a moderate pace and have a bike test offers stability........Another possibility is to go with the 275 and just hang onto my 29er but hate to have a bike that seldom gets used.
    My FS 29er is currently listed on CL since I got a Bronson. The 27.5 simply fits my style and trails better....which equals way more fun. I feel more in control and much more stable my technical trail sections and just as fast on the flow. I am keeping my HT 29er for when I want speed over quickness.
    Bicycles don't have motors.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Looking for exactly what you've mentioned, more fun! I am not a racer or one who does technical trails. I just want to have fun, move at a moderate pace and have a bike test offers stability.
    The Trek Fuel is available with either wheel size with a 2.4 wide tire. I think I will demo the 275 first since I own a 29 er and think my first impression between the two bikes will be the deciding factor. If doubtful after the ride, I will demo again with the 29 wheelset.

    Another possibility is to go with the 275 and just hang onto my 29er but hate to have a bike that seldom gets used.
    Why not buy the Fuel 27.5+ and buy another set of 29 wheels so you can have two bikes in one? Swap wheel sets when you are in the mood for one over the other.

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    [QUOTE=Dr Evil;13431939]Why not buy the Fuel 27.5+ and buy another set of 29 wheels so you can have two bikes in one? Swap wheel sets when you are in the mood for one over the other.[/QUOT

    Guess I could own another wheel set but what kind of work and time is involved with changing out the cassette?

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    That's a smart solution. And if you have the right tools, changing a cassette and rotors is a 20 min job at best (including time to align the rotors).

    Chain whip,
    Cassette Removal tool
    Torx T25 head for socket set

    Be prepared though, cassette removal is either really easy, or a PITA depending on if your freehub body is being chewed up by your cassette.

    they sometimes slide off, and other times the gouges make it more time consuming. And without gloves those teeth want to eat your hands. :^(

    And for me I own both 27.5 and 29. Both FS and the 29" is shorter travel at 120 vs the 150 on the other bike.

    Love them both but prefer the 27.5 and I'm 1.93m so height isn't the main factor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JonJones View Post
    That's a smart solution. And if you have the right tools, changing a cassette and rotors is a 20 min job at best (including time to align the rotors).

    Chain whip,
    Cassette Removal tool
    Torx T25 head for socket set

    Be prepared though, cassette removal is either really easy, or a PITA depending on if your freehub body is being chewed up by your cassette.

    they sometimes slide off, and other times the gouges make it more time consuming. And without gloves those teeth want to eat your hands. :^(

    And for me I own both 27.5 and 29. Both FS and the 29" is shorter travel at 120 vs the 150 on the other bike.

    Love them both but prefer the 27.5 and I'm 1.93m so height isn't the main factor.
    I was thinking the rotors were inexpensive so I would have those on the wheels but I have not checked the price.

    I am just hoping that my demo ride makes it clear what wheel size I would rather have. I am tall but in my mid 60's so I'm thinking the 275 might make the ride a little easier and more fun. Won't know until I try it but this is what some other people have told me.

  18. #18
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    You don't change out the cassette, you build complete wheels with cassette and rotors. As to swapping them - no time at all if you set both wheels up the same and build using the same hubs, cassette and rotors or you can shim the rotors so no need to adjust the calipers every time you swap.

    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Evil View Post
    Why not buy the Fuel 27.5+ and buy another set of 29 wheels so you can have two bikes in one? Swap wheel sets when you are in the mood for one over the other.
    Guess I could own another wheel set but what kind of work and time is involved with changing out the cassette?
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    You don't change out the cassette, you build complete wheels with cassette and rotors. As to swapping them - no time at all if you set both wheels up the same and build using the same hubs, cassette and rotors or you can shim the rotors so no need to adjust the calipers every time you swap.
    Makes most sense to have another duplicate wheel set but I thought cassettes were pricey. I guess I should find out the exact cost and perhaps negotiate the extra wheelset when buying the bike!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Huge 29er fan and early adoptor. Wanted long travel so went 275. Both were great but 29er still won out for old fashioned trail riding.

    Then tried a 275 with 2.6" tires. Wow. Makes me not sure I want to go back to 29. If I were short I'd stay with the 275x2.6 for sure.

    I do like to keep 2 bikes running so will likley end up with a 275x2.6 and a 29. But if the 29 won't take 2.6" tires not sure I want the big hoops.
    I found 2.6's to be complete game changers on a 27.5. Faster+grippier+more comfortable = more fun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    I found 2.6's to be complete game changers on a 27.5. Faster+grippier+more comfortable = more fun.
    Absolutely. I wouldn't buy a 275 frame if it could not take 2.6" tires. For trail riding these things are a game changer.

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    I have a Specialized Rockhopper 29er. I'm only 5'6" and I find the larger wheels sluggish on the technical stuff and tougher to get up to speed. It doesn't handle nearly as quick as my last bike which was a 27.5. I really don't feel confident hitting jumps or drops on it either,.

    Once it's rolling if there's lots of roots etc and on flowing single track it's decent. I'll likely keep it, or give it to my wife when i upgrade in a year or two. My next bike will most likely be a 27.5 though.

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    I wanted more of a trail race bike than a traditional 29er XC bike and there were a lot of great 27.5 offerings that fit that bell. Bikes such as the rocky mountain thunderbolt, jamis dragon, and even the new giant fathom. Today the new scalpel and scott bikes are more trail oriented, but they showed up after their 27.5 rivals hit the market.

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    Depends on everyone's budgets. Some might have the $$$ to have spare cassettes and rotors, and others not. I didn't want to presume. :^)

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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    I found 2.6's to be complete game changers on a 27.5. Faster+grippier+more comfortable = more fun.
    Exactly what several people have told me, more stability more fun.

    My only question, does it require a lot more effort to pedal?? People are telling me it just takes a little getting use to.

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    A mate of mine is running them on a Pivot M5.5c after being on a Santa Cruz TallboyC and it's night and day better.

    More comfortable, more grip and traction, just as easy to pedal, if not easier. Doesn't seem to be a downside for him on 2.6" tyres running ID30mm on 27.5" wheels.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonJones View Post
    A mate of mine is running them on a Pivot M5.5c after being on a Santa Cruz TallboyC and it's night and day better.

    More comfortable, more grip and traction, just as easy to pedal, if not easier. Doesn't seem to be a downside for him on 2.6" tyres running ID30mm on 27.5" wheels.
    The Trek comes with 29 I mm rims so guess I could run 2.5 tires and that should be a great ride.

    Thanks so much for your response!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Exactly what several people have told me, more stability more fun.

    My only question, does it require a lot more effort to pedal?? People are telling me it just takes a little getting used to.

    Here's the deal...


    Feels slower as the ride is muted/damped over the chatter. Did some timed loops with my watch on a 30-35 min loop with my two 275 bikes. I was convinced the 2.6" tires were more fun and had more traction, but were slower. The bike with the 2.6" tires (DHF/Forekaster) was at least 2 pounds heavier, and ran a coil shock. The other bike, a tricked out plastic rig, was running 2.3" tires DHF/DHRII. Set up was otherwise similar on both bikes. The "loop" ended on a slightly higher elevation so if favored a pedally bike by a hair. It also included a small stretch of dirt road climbing. Otherwise it was a rather technical trail that had some fairly sketchy descents, that had major consequences (exposure) should you screw up.

    The clock did not lie. The 2.6" tires were faster by about 4 minutes on a 30-35 minute loop and that is a lot. Also, I felt like I was riding on the edge on the sketchy DH with the 2.3" tires, and with the 2.6" I had more than enough control that I could have pushed the pace harder if I wanted to.


    These 2.6" tires are really something else. They claw their way up climbs way better, they add a lot of damping to take out trail chatter on the way down, and unexpectedly they seem to roll at least as fast as a 2.3" tire of similar make. About the only downside I can think of is they may end up being less durable, but I've ridden mine all season with zero issues on trail/AM rides. I would not run them on an enduro type ride where you are blasting all DH through major chunk at major speed. I think these tires need a bit more finesse to keep them intact, they are not made for plowing. Then again, I've yet to kill one.

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    I would just listen to the local bike shop. 27.5 plus will perform the same as 29 so I wouldn't worry about two wheel sets. True 27.5 bikes are lighter and typically better at larger obstacles and tight turns but not as good at tiny obstacles and big fast turns. If I was going up five miles of fire road covered in fist size rocks I would want a 29er. If I was riding smooth hard pack with a log every two hundred yards I would want 27.5.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Here's the deal...


    Feels slower as the ride is muted/damped over the chatter. Did some timed loops with my watch on a 30-35 min loop with my two 275 bikes. I was convinced the 2.6" tires were more fun and had more traction, but were slower. The bike with the 2.6" tires (DHF/Forekaster) was at least 2 pounds heavier, and ran a coil shock. The other bike, a tricked out plastic rig, was running 2.3" tires DHF/DHRII. Set up was otherwise similar on both bikes. The "loop" ended on a slightly higher elevation so if favored a pedally bike by a hair. It also included a small stretch of dirt road climbing. Otherwise it was a rather technical trail that had some fairly sketchy descents, that had major consequences (exposure) should you screw up.

    The clock did not lie. The 2.6" tires were faster by about 4 minutes on a 30-35 minute loop and that is a lot. Also, I felt like I was riding on the edge on the sketchy DH with the 2.3" tires, and with the 2.6" I had more than enough control that I could have pushed the pace harder if I wanted to.


    These 2.6" tires are really something else. They claw their way up climbs way better, they add a lot of damping to take out trail chatter on the way down, and unexpectedly they seem to roll at least as fast as a 2.3" tire of similar make. About the only downside I can think of is they may end up being less durable, but I've ridden mine all season with zero issues on trail/AM rides. I would not run them on an enduro type ride where you are blasting all DH through major chunk at major speed. I think these tires need a bit more finesse to keep them intact, they are not made for plowing. Then again, I've yet to kill one.
    You are making question the decision to run the upcoming 2.5 DHF/Aggressor and go for the 2.6 DHF/Rekon instead. I am not sure how much of a difference it would make between these to tire setups. Plus, I am not sure a Balance with a Jade will need the damping from the 2.6 size. I do like the potential extra traction (confidence) a 2.6 promises however. It seems like that might be why your big bike was faster that the plastic one. What is your coil shocked ride?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Makes most sense to have another duplicate wheel set but I thought cassettes were pricey. I guess I should find out the exact cost and perhaps negotiate the extra wheelset when buying the bike!
    You don't necessarily need an extra cassette or have to remove the cassette from the freehub if both wheels use the same driver. Just pull the entire cassette and freehub driver off the axle and move it to the other hub. I do this all the time swapping between 27.5 and 29er wheelsets or when I just want to lube the ratchet in my DT350 hubs. No tools required, takes less than a minute.

    If your hubs use Shimano centerlock brake disc rotors you can also swap these between hubs, again in less than a minute. I use CL rotors and find I don't even have to adjust the calipers when switching wheelsets. This also keeps the rotors and brake pads matched.

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    Another cassette does not have to be expensive, but I guess if you're one of those who need to have the latest and are running eagle, then maybe yes, but the ease of the swap when you have 2 complete wheelset if the difference between you reaching for and swapping wheels or hesitating because there's work involved and just sticking with what's on right now.

    As to the easy swap by pulling the whole freehub off, yes, doable, IF, you are running a DT Swiss hub, if not, most other hubs are locked on by the end caps and DT hubs are not cheap.
    Quote Originally Posted by levity View Post
    You don't necessarily need an extra cassette or have to remove the cassette from the freehub if both wheels use the same driver. Just pull the entire cassette and freehub driver off the axle and move it to the other hub. I do this all the time swapping between 27.5 and 29er wheelsets or when I just want to lube the ratchet in my DT350 hubs. No tools required, takes less than a minute.

    If your hubs use Shimano centerlock brake disc rotors you can also swap these between hubs, again in less than a minute. I use CL rotors and find I don't even have to adjust the calipers when switching wheelsets. This also keeps the rotors and brake pads matched.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

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    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post

    My only question, does it require a lot more effort to pedal?? People are telling me it just takes a little getting use to.
    They're slower to accelerate (more mass) and rolling resistance is technically higher (more mass, larger circumference and lower pressures = greater hysteresis). However their ability to carry momentum over roots, rocks, etc and the less energy your legs and arms have to use acting as suspension generally makes up the difference. If anything you'll at least feel less beat up from bumpy terrain.


    I personally wasn't a fan of the 2.8 Rekons at higher speeds. Steering input and feedback was muted and cornering knobs weren't aggressive enough (they're like big Ardents). A good moderate speed trail tire but I'd probably look at something more like the 2.5 DHF for all out riding on the edge.

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    I went from a 140/160 29er(2015 Intense Carbine) to a 140/160 27.5er(Pivot 5.5) this past weekend. The biggest thing I noticed regarding the wheel size was just how much insane grip/traction I found with the 2.6 tires that Pivot built the 5.5 around. Being that it's a new bike it's automatically more fun that my old bike, but I don't think there will be any tradeoffs or downsides.
    Last edited by patnugent; 11-27-2017 at 03:46 PM.

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    I just made the switch after demo'ing a couple 27.5's. There's pros and cons to both wheel sizes but for me the 27.5 felt more nimble and more quick and fun for my local trails.

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    I started out riding a cheap 26er, then upgraded to a mid-range entry 29er hardtail. Iím only 5í 8Ē so was initially dubious about going to 29 wheels. But a few test rides convinced me it could work for me.

    Added a second 29er (GT Sensor 9r) full-suspension) soon after. Neither bike was light or flickable but rolled over but much everything I encounter. Really maintained speed in x-country type trails but didnít accelerate quickly.

    Last year I sold the Sensor 9r and went with a FS 27.5 (Yeti SB5c) to have a more distinctly different ride than my 29er hardtail.

    Not really apples-to-apples comparison as the HT is alloy and the 27.5 is carbon. Plus the Yeti is a decidedly better spec.

    But beyond all that I feel the 27.5 is generally more nimble in tight, twisty situations. Definitely more playful all around as itís just much less bike to throw around.

    Canít ever see myself getting a 27.5 hardtail but the smaller hoops on the full-sus bike make for a very capable and fun trail-oriented bike. And maybe itís Yetiís Switch Infinity suspension system but on most type of climbs the SB5 outclimbs the hardtail even fully open.


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    Recently bought a Scott Spark 27.5 in an XL, and I've been riding 29ers and fatbikes for the last 6 years. I'm 6'3" so most conventional wisdom would say stick with the bigger wheels, but I'm enjoying the 27.5, most of the time. When traction gets limited on climbs or I need to span bigger root systems, the 29er will be more comfy. Almost everywhere else I enjoy the smaller faster handling setup. I don't yet know which is faster for certain, but my Strava segment times are close on either bike and it probably has more to do with how I'm feeling on a given day.

    I am tempted to get some stans flows and throw some 2.4s on it, and maybe get the best of both.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumblefish29er View Post
    Recently bought a Scott Spark 27.5 in an XL, and I've been riding 29ers and fatbikes for the last 6 years. I'm 6'3" so most conventional wisdom would say stick with the bigger wheels, but I'm enjoying the 27.5, most of the time. When traction gets limited on climbs or I need to span bigger root systems, the 29er will be more comfy. Almost everywhere else I enjoy the smaller faster handling setup. I don't yet know which is faster for certain, but my Strava segment times are close on either bike and it probably has more to do with how I'm feeling on a given day.

    I am tempted to get some stans flows and throw some 2.4s on it, and maybe get the best of both.
    So you running tires less than 2.4's on your 29 er?

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    On the 29er Iím running xking 2.4s on the older Arch Ex rims which I think are either 21 or 23 inside width.

    My 27.5 has 2.25s on 20mm....Scott for some reason specs narrow rims on their bikes.

    So itís not a fair comparison. If I had 2.4s on the 27.5, they would be even more similar, especially with wider rims.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumblefish29er View Post
    On the 29er Iím running xking 2.4s on the older Arch Ex rims which I think are either 21 or 23 inside width.

    My 27.5 has 2.25s on 20mm....Scott for some reason specs narrow rims on their bikes.

    So itís not a fair comparison. If I had 2.4s on the 27.5, they would be even more similar, especially with wider rims.
    I went from 2.2 on my 29 er to 2.35 in a more aggressive tread and the bike handles much better.

    When getting a 27.5 bike, I want to to run a 2.5 or 2.6 tire.

  41. #41
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    29 fs + ht, now 27.5+ fs + ht. It's an epiphany. The ability to carve turns sold me.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyle242gt View Post
    29 fs + ht, now 27.5+ fs + ht. It's an epiphany. The ability to carve turns sold me.
    Recently met an bunch of riders who have switched from a 29 er to a 27.5 plus which is what I amthinking of ordering!

  43. #43
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    This switch is not a hard one to make, an avg 650B 2.8" tyre is roughly 28.25" tall, so much closer to being 29" relative to a regular 650B which is much closer to being a 26er than 29er like the BS marketing would lead you to believe. If you get a truly voluminous 2.8", they can go as tall as 28.4" and a true 3.0" is about 28.7", hence why there are so many bikes coming out that promote this feature 650B+/29" capable.

    Quote Originally Posted by rickcin View Post
    Recently met an bunch of riders who have switched from a 29 er to a 27.5 plus which is what I amthinking of ordering!
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    This switch is not a hard one to make, an avg 650B 2.8" tyre is roughly 28.25" tall, so much closer to being 29" relative to a regular 650B which is much closer to being a 26er than 29er like the BS marketing would lead you to believe. If you get a truly voluminous 2.8", they can go as tall as 28.4" and a true 3.0" is about 28.7", hence why there are so many bikes coming out that promote this feature 650B+/29" capable.
    Exactly correct and that is why is I plan to buy a bike that will accommodate 29 inch wheels as well. The industry is developing in keeping up with the needs of riders. The constant debate between wheel sizes will continue to play out and the industry will continue to fulfill their needs and now the plus tires are the latest rage. A plush ride on roots and rocks with great stability, that is what I am looking for and hoping to get with a new bike along with a dropper seatpost and a single chainring. All of the most recent improvements!!

  45. #45
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    I have always ridden 29er and bought a 27.5 back in February. After putting about 1200 miles on the 27.5 I am going back to 29. I just feel the 29 carries momentum better and suits my riding conditions and style better.
    In serving the wicked, expect no reward, and be thankful if you escape injury for your pains.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stalkerfiveo View Post
    I have always ridden 29er and bought a 27.5 back in February. After putting about 1200 miles on the 27.5 I am going back to 29. I just feel the 29 carries momentum better and suits my riding conditions and style better.
    Buying a bike to accommodate both wheel sizes so if I do miss riding a 29 er I will just need to buy another wheelset.

  47. #47
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    Went from my 29+ Stache 9 to a Knolly Endorphin 27.5x2.3 and the Stache is collecting dust.
    Admittedly I am going to install the widest Minions I can get away with just for the steep and greasy climbs around here, but the maneuverability of the smaller wheelset is a revelation for me, just more fun.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barman1 View Post
    Went from my 29+ Stache 9 to a Knolly Endorphin 27.5x2.3 and the Stache is collecting dust.
    Admittedly I am going to install the widest Minions I can get away with just for the steep and greasy climbs around here, but the maneuverability of the smaller wheelset is a revelation for me, just more fun.
    Yeah, you do need to go much wider!

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