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  1. #1
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    Is it plausible to ride a hardtail on DH trails?

    I recently built a really beefy hardtail in hopes of having a trail bike that climbs well. The problem is, all I have in the way of trails are these crazy downhill trails. Is it advisable to ride these trails?

  2. #2
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    Yes.

  3. #3
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    Is it plausible to ride a hardtail on DH trails?

    Uhhhh, ever heard of dirtjump? They are 24/26" though, so that could be an issue for you.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Goinslow View Post
    Yes.
    /thread

  5. #5
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    Send it!

  6. #6
    Yeet so hard
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    Last summer i was at a bikepark with some buddies and there was a dude on a titanium kona honzo single speed. He rode harder and better than any of us.




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  7. #7
    CoolArrow
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    The wand can be helpful though...

    Is it plausible to ride a hardtail on DH trails?-p1110789.jpg
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by VenomousDancer1234 View Post
    I recently built a really beefy hardtail in hopes of having a trail bike that climbs well. The problem is, all I have in the way of trails are these crazy downhill trails. Is it advisable to ride these trails?
    Maybe. A lot depends on how you ride, the trails themselves, and the particular hardtail bike.

    Here's an example of a hardtail that is very downhill capable:

    https://ridegg.com/pedalhead

    Of course, if you want to go really fast over very rough terrain, then a FS bike makes a lot of sense.
    Riding Washington State singletrack since 1986

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by tims5377 View Post
    Last summer i was at a bikepark with some buddies and there was a dude on a titanium kona honzo single speed. He rode harder and better than any of us.




    It's the wizard, not the wand...
    And in his head he's saying, F this never again lol.

  10. #10
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    Is it plausible to ride a hard tail on a DH trail?
    Sure.
    Is it advisable for YOU to do it on YOUR bike?
    How should we know?

  11. #11
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    no. you will die. unpossible.

  12. #12
    i'm schralping yer thread
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    Nope. Never been done.


  13. #13
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    Yep.

    Just expect to be a little more tenderized at the bottom ^^

    The ride will be a lot more engaging & you'll have to spot your lines early.

    A beefy wheel set is a must.

    140mm - 160mm of travel, depending on your wheel size (haven't seen/heard of many HT's running 170+)

    Strong brakes & large rotors...

    I'll take my Scout 290 down some pretty gnarly stuff... but, I wouldn't want to do it 'all' the time.

    More of a way to break things up & keep things interesting.

    'We'll all make it to the top... Some of us, might not make it to the bottom'
    Last edited by targnik; 04-11-2018 at 05:47 PM.
    "Mountain biking: the under-rated and drug-free antidepressant"

  14. #14
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    Hmmm, my first bike had no suspension at all. Rode up and down all kinds of stuff, that was the early 80s. Sometime in the mid 90s, I got my first bike with front suspension. Rode up and down all kinds of stuff, felt somewhat better. Around 2004, bought my first full suspension bike, rode up and down all kinds of stuff, felt great coming down, a little more work going up. As years went on, all my MTBs have been full suspension, each one better and lighter than the last. The rides I do haven't changed much, the FS bikes are nice for my no longer young body.

    So, the bike didn't make much difference on where I went, but the bike did change the comfort of the ride.

  15. #15
    RAKC Industries
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    Ive never been shy about what my bike can handle, just me. I dont do gap jumps or any form of serious air. But having my nice b+ hard tail Im getting more confident/brave. No gap jumps but Ill take on stuff that you jump it or you crash, no rolling it. Roots and rocks like in the video my body isnt pleased, feel beat up but Im 36 and a big guy. I dont have runs like whistler here but we have trails that have segments like what you see in that video.

    FS isnt a need by any stretch, its a luxury/upgrade. Your legs can do the same job as a rear shock.

    But be warned since your asking this question you had better find riders willing to help guide you, will get in way over your head real fast.

    You dont need 140+ travel either, guys ride downhill runs on rigid fat bikes.... its skills and how much you can handle.

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  16. #16
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    ummmm - what bike is that?? cant make out the brand on the downtime - and it looks like one i should put on my radar

  17. #17
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    The one in the video? Not sure... the one I posted in the photo is a Dartmoor Hornet.

    It's intended for rugged enduro/dh use, according to the company's marketing. Head angle is 65, rear end is short-ish at 420mm. Takes up to 2.8 tires, threaded bb, and accepts up to a 200mm fork.

    I have not had mine on a real DH trail, but it's plenty capable on everything up to that. Only limiting factor is the rider
    Cool BandolArrow

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamper11 View Post
    ummmm - what bike is that?? cant make out the brand on the downtime - and it looks like one i should put on my radar
    Chromag, I think Stylus or Samurai. But 26" -- it's from 2009.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    FS isnt a need by any stretch, its a luxury/upgrade. Your legs can do the same job as a rear shock.
    I think a lot of people think this but in reality you cannot react nearly as fast as your suspension can. However, you don't need suspension at all for big jumps (see bmx dirt jumping). Landing flat or on rough terrain can get uncomfortable though.

  20. #20
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    Youd be surprised how fast the body can react when its all your body knows. But thats splitting hairs.

    The rough matter, yes, yes and YES. It takes a toll on you. I cant wait for the day I can find an afford an FS I want. More the affording than finding. But this is where plus bikes became popular. The difference is very noticeable when it gets rough. And a plus hard tail keeps costs down from day 1 to day 10000. Less parts to wear and maintain/replace.

    But the rough/techy stuff my experience is that wider is better. Especially after this last weekend. Set multiple PRs and felt great (plus finished way better than expected) for an XC race I decided to do. This one trail set was all about traction and bike skills. And though I got smoked by many I held my own better than I ever have. There was no real climbing (short steep punchy stuff thats it) but rocks, g outs, roots, steps you name it. Had a couple riders wonder how I was as fast as I was (275lbs, biggest guy there on a heavy b+ bike). My response was pretty simple "this is the one of the few places me and this bike really shine. Put long climbs in front of me and Im dead last every time no matter what bike, but these kinds of trails are my thing. I love it, bike was bought and set up specifically to give me confidence to go all out on this stuff. Dont worry, we both race any other event this season, youll waste me early on and never see me again till the end lol. Im fat and slow".

    Thats what works for me and why I have ridden anything I feel brave enough to ride. Bike can do way more than me and plus tires allow me less abuse without the expense of FS. Though no where near as nice as FS, its a major step in the right direction.

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    Youd be surprised how fast the body can react when its all your body knows. But thats splitting hairs.
    I mean your body has limits and the suspension is faster than whatever that limit is. There's a short downhill rock garden I frequently ride with rocks ranging from about 6-18" and it's steep enough you have to carry the bike if you walk up it. The bottom section is basically a point of no return kinda of feature, meaning you're going to end up at the bottom of the hill no matter what. I can do it on my hardtail if I go slow enough. If I go too fast the bike will not track across the rocks but instead skip completely over some of the larger ones. This means the front or rear sometimes surprisingly drops 24"+ independently of each other and that's pretty unsettling. My 150mm bike will track through it much faster.

    I agree on the plus HT. If I buy another one I'll probably get something that will run at least 27.5x2.6. Maybe even 29+.

  22. #22
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    Ya I know body limits lmao. Pushed my endurance limits today, can barely walk now lol.

    But your very right. The body has limits suspension can surpass by far.

    2.6 is barely plus in my book. Narrowest tires I own are 3.0.

    Trails with rocks changing sizes that much I would be reserved about riding, that is a place I would declare beyond me and limits of my bike. But as you said, still doable on a hardtail.

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  23. #23
    flow where ever you go
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    It's easy. Just lower the saddle and use your legs as suspension. When that gets old, get a FS bike.

    "I must not be crazy because I'm seriously questioning my sanity"

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