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  1. #1
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    Marin Hawk Hill "Best Bike for around $1500.00"

    I'm strong considering getting this bike or a bike in this price range. Please let me know what you guys think. The sales rep immediately moved to another version of Marin "$2400.00". He said I will want to upgrade not sure how he knew I would upgrade but I'm a total beginner trail rider only.

    http://www.marinbikes.com/us/bikes/d...hill-multitrac

    Thank you

  2. #2
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    Everybody upgrades if they stay in the game. It's just a matter of time.
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  3. #3
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    so if you going to upgrade anyway then shouldn't you start with an entry level bike and only upgrade those items you feel are necessary? Or should you spend the extra 1K and then upgrade anyway?

  4. #4
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    Upgrading is fun if you're inclined to enjoy shopping and fiddling around with your bike. As for value it is better to buy the high-end model and already have better wheels, shifters, maybe brakes and suspension too. Then instead of doubting your equipment you can focus on trail-skills. As an old guy who has ridden several well worn bikes, and spent $ on new bikes, I'd say you should buy middle to high-end models and then spend time and money on instruction. It is always fun to ride trails, but it is more fun to ride your bike well. Lot of satisfaction being smooth and fast.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ernestovr View Post
    I'm strong considering getting this bike or a bike in this price range. Please let me know what you guys think. The sales rep immediately moved to another version of Marin "$2400.00". He said I will want to upgrade not sure how he knew I would upgrade but I'm a total beginner trail rider only.

    http://www.marinbikes.com/us/bikes/d...hill-multitrac

    Thank you
    I don't necessarily agree with the other comments or the sales guy..of course he's gonna try to upsell. For $1500 it looks like a good bike, but yes, if you already know for sure you're really into the sport it 'could' be a good idea to stretch the budget a bit if possible. If you're already at the max, take it for a test ride..I've ridden 7k bikes that I didn't like after demoing and 2k bikes that were more fun to me. They sell $1500ish fs bikes now for good reason and it's a good way to get into the sport without breaking the bank. Btw, do you remember what model he mentioned?..if you do decide to spend more, look at other companies too. Hope this helps.

  6. #6
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    In my experience, I cant get the quality of wheels or suspension I want for under about 6 grand, if I want it included with a factory build.

    ... I cant swing $6k on a bike.

    I can however, spend a couple grand on a bike, and add in another $1000 here and there to get a top of the line fork, and some wheels I enjoy. The rest of the spec doesnt match, but I honestly dont mind. I want nice wheels and a great, premium fork.

    To me, a 1500 bike is about the same as a 2500 bike, or even 3500... or more sometimes. None of them are going to have suspension I wants, so the fork, shock and wheels are all coming off no matter what.

    The hawk hill is long(ish), pretty slack. Looks like a lot of fun! Id go for it, as long as you're looking for a short travel trail bike.

  7. #7
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    Oh, I'm NOT saying to buy the $1500 bike. If that's what you WANT to spend, that's what you should do. I have friends that I have taken bike shopping to buy $500 bikes to start out on. I have one set of friends, a married couple, start out on Wal-Mart bikes, move up to Costco bikes, then on to $2000 bikes and now ride $6-7000 bikes. That was over a 4-5 year period. All I was saying is, in a tongue in cheek way, is that you'll be upgrading one way or another if you get the bug. You may get so good that you think you can progress better on a better bike or you just may end up upgrading parts as your current ones wear out.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ernestovr View Post
    so if you going to upgrade anyway then shouldn't you start with an entry level bike and only upgrade those items you feel are necessary? Or should you spend the extra 1K and then upgrade anyway?
    You typically get more bang for the buck buying a higher model. Changing out just the fork and shock can easily run you $1000.

    Bikes tech is changing at a fairly quick pace. You may find you want an entirely new bike with different geo so upgrading components might be a bit useless. Being a novice it may be worth buying the entry model and building your skills up. After a year or two see what you dislike about the bike and what new models are out there. Decide if you want to upgrade your bike or buy a new one with different geo or suspension design.

    I've seen a lot of new guys buying $5-6k bikes every year but they still ride poorly. They blame the bike and are looking for the right fit but never seem to find it. they would have been better off buying a cheaper model and taking some skills/training courses instead.

    It may be more prudent for you to buy a $1500 bike and spend $300-500 on some courses to improve your skill.
    Everyone is entitled to my opinion.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghoti View Post
    You typically get more bang for the buck buying a higher model. Changing out just the fork and shock can easily run you $1000.
    ^^ this

    only buy a low spec / entry level bike if you don't plan to upgrade. Should you change your opinion later on better sell the bike and use the money of the sale + the money you were willing to spend for upgrades to "start fresh".

    Trust me, I've been through this many times, I'm right now debating whether if it's reasonable to buy a new wheelset for my current two year (!) old bike or just sell it and use the 1000$ I was willing to spend buying a new sled

  10. #10
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    I'm not new to Mtn biking but I was out of it for about a year. I went with a Motobecane Hal6 Pro for $2k to get me back in. The components you get are sick. Rockshox Pike, monarch plus, and full XT.

    I'll ride it for a while and keep and eye out for a deal on a nice 6" travel frame when one pops up and swap my parts over.

    But the bike you are looking at certainly isn't bad and if you want it I say go for it.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mannyfnz View Post
    I don't necessarily agree with the other comments or the sales guy..of course he's gonna try to upsell. For $1500 it looks like a good bike, but yes, if you already know for sure you're really into the sport it 'could' be a good idea to stretch the budget a bit if possible. If you're already at the max, take it for a test ride..I've ridden 7k bikes that I didn't like after demoing and 2k bikes that were more fun to me. They sell $1500ish fs bikes now for good reason and it's a good way to get into the sport without breaking the bank. Btw, do you remember what model he mentioned?..if you do decide to spend more, look at other companies too. Hope this helps.
    + +

    Yeah and if you do or are that big percentage that upgrades eventually, your current choice puts you into a respectable f/s bike that will do wonders over what 'we' were riding or started out on 20 years ago, 10 or even 6. Keep in mind, the word "upgrade" is very subjective. If the $ales guy was bumping you from a $1500 bike to one that was a few hundred more and could show you some specific advantages, that's another story. I'm not saying he's an elitist pr1ck by snubbing bikes sub $2500 as the entry level bike because he is a SALESman.

    Others mention upgrade as per swapping out and changing parts later on. Aside from having to fix damage or replace broken items, it's not usually smart money to built up a bike from the retail parts bin. I'm using 'upgrade' in respect to your 2nd or 3rd bike. Also keep in mind one poster said; upgrading or spending more on bikes IF YOU GET THE BUG. That's a good point. These newer f/s bikes in the 1200-1500 range will give you room to grow, not have a list of shortcomings to a newer rider and let you see if you have/get the bug. Riding styles / needs can change. A next bike might just be a different style in addition to your first bike.

    By the time you are ready to change bikes, you'll get some trickle down benefits from what's coming out right now selling at top dollar. See what a $2500 bike gets you now and look at 2 - 3 years out. By then, maybe your bike will be a bit beneath you and your ability.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbogosia View Post
    I'm not new to Mtn biking but I was out of it for about a year. I went with a Motobecane Hal6 Pro for $2k to get me back in. The components you get are sick. Rockshox Pike, monarch plus, and full XT.

    I'll ride it for a while and keep and eye out for a deal on a nice 6" travel frame when one pops up and swap my parts over.

    But the bike you are looking at certainly isn't bad and if you want it I say go for it.
    Seen one on the trail last week. Sweet bike and what a great price point with those specs. Good for you.
    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  13. #13
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    This is really something you will have to answer for yourself, we can only offer you some thoughts with our very limited knowledge of you and your situation.

    I do not ride expensive bikes, though I have been riding for a long time. I have a wife and kids, so saving for college (even though my daughter has a full scholarship, dorm, airplane tickets, etc are still a lot of $), retirement, house payment, etc. I'm happy to say unlike most Americans, I can easily cover an emergency if I need to without going into any financial debt. I have no idea of the financial situation of any of the other posters, I'm sure it varies so I'm not making any assumptions.

    I ride on rooty, rocky XC trails on 100mm full and an 80mm hardtail. I see you are in California so you very well may need more/bigger suspension than I do, you've got bigger rocks. I also only weigh about 140 so I'm not too concerned with "flexy". And I prefer more old-school pick a line riding than just bombing down the trail and letting the suspension handle it. I'm not the fastest down the trail but I'm also not the slowest. I rode with a group a couple of weeks ago and I believe I was by far on the cheapest bike but I had no trouble keeping up, in fact, I was more in the front, pausing to let the slower riders catch up.

    When I got my Superlight, I was concerned because the components were lower grade than what I had been riding. But I discovered that new lower end was much better than old (and worn) higher end. Deore is pretty darn good now-a-days. The %$#@ Avid brakes developed a stuck piston, after trying unsuccessfully to get it to retract, I replaced them with Shimano SLX. I think even the lower end Shimano disks like on the Hawk Hill are still pretty good. My cheap headset also gave out so I upgraded it. The fork, also a Rockshox Recon Silver, I was worried about but I have been very happy with it, though it is on the heavy side. I've bought the Motion Control damper to upgrade it but I haven't gotten around to it yet (I think the HH fork already has this). So I've probably spent around $250 - $300 in upgrades. Granted, that is starting to get close to the higher level build of the Superlight that was offered but I actually bought mine used, when it was a year old.

    One guy above mentioned that he likes expensive forks. That's fine, I'm fine with a less expensive fork. I'm not looking for a baby butt smooth ride (I sometimes ride my CX on singletrack) or the ability to get down the trail as fast as possible and as I mentioned, I'm not taking lots of big hits. When I bought my Dragon a couple of years ago (it's a 2006), I was sure I would be replacing the fork but I found I liked it, even though it is only 80mm. I have ridden forks I did not like, they were too jittery on the small bumps. I think the advice often given to spend enough for an air fork is good advice.

    So anyway, you know your situation much better than any of us. Weigh what everyone has said, do some research, ride some bikes. Whatever you decide to buy will be a big upgrade from what you've been riding and you'll enjoy it. If a more expensive bike fits into your situation, that's fine; but only you can decide that.
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  14. #14
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    I picked one of these up a week ago and have been enjoying it. This is my first full-suspension bike so I'm no expert. I could have stretched my budget to $2500 but ultimately I wanted to have some money left over for other things. I replaced the tires and set them up tubeless. That cost me a little more. It's not the lightest bike I've ridden (but not crazy heavy), but it descends well and I find that it goes where I want it to with little trouble. I'm cleaning things that always gave me trouble on my hardtail 29ers. I say buy as much bike as you feel comfortable affording and ride it. There are almost always little things I want to change on a new bike below a certain price range, tires, saddle, grips, that all costs money and this is no different but I really like mine and worth the money to me.

  15. #15
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    One nice thing about the new Marins is that they do spec most of the current standards, like Boost spacing, etc. So if you do choose to upgrade in the not too distant future, you won't be stuck like Chuck as you often are buying lower pricepoint bikes.

    I have the Rift Zone 2, in no small part to avoid the rear axle jury rig they did on the 1 (but at least the dropout is thru-axle.

  16. #16
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    I would get the 1 with these wheels. https://www.bike24.com/1.php?content...140,318;page=2 You can convert the wheels to boost down the road if you want to and easily sell them and get your money back. https://www.mrpbike.com/better-boost-adapter-kits/j. I'm not a huge fan of the fork on the 2 and definitely not a fan of the fork on the 3. If you want to upgrade forks I would get something like this. https://www.ebay.com/itm/RockShox-Pi...gAAOSwZ~ha3igZ. Then the only other two things I would consider upgrading would be brakes and the dropper. You could easily move all of the parts to a carbon boost frame like an intense spider. Hold onto your old fork and wheels so you can sell the bike oem and sell the extras separately. A lot of the new trail bikes are going with 130mm forks so you may want to bump from 120 to 130 if you upgrade forks. They changed standards so you can get those wheels for a steal and they are versatile enough to use for a very very long time. The hubs retailed for like $700 usd.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by party_wagon View Post
    I would get the 1 with these wheels. https://www.bike24.com/1.php?content...140,318;page=2 You can convert the wheels to boost down the road if you want to and easily sell them and get your money back. https://www.mrpbike.com/better-boost-adapter-kits/j. I'm not a huge fan of the fork on the 2 and definitely not a fan of the fork on the 3. If you want to upgrade forks I would get something like this. https://www.ebay.com/itm/RockShox-Pi...gAAOSwZ~ha3igZ. Then the only other two things I would consider upgrading would be brakes and the dropper. You could easily move all of the parts to a carbon boost frame like an intense spider. Hold onto your old fork and wheels so you can sell the bike oem and sell the extras separately. A lot of the new trail bikes are going with 130mm forks so you may want to bump from 120 to 130 if you upgrade forks. They changed standards so you can get those wheels for a steal and they are versatile enough to use for a very very long time. The hubs retailed for like $700 usd.
    Hmmm. I wonder what the OP ended up with since he posted up 14 months ago?......
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  18. #18
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    I bought the Hawk Hill 1. I like it. Yes I plan to upgrade it. I will spend 1000 bucks on suspension which you could argue I would have gotten on the Hawk Hill 3. The difference is I get to pick the suspension. I plan to put a pike fork with a monarch shock for my 1000. The 3 would have forced me into a Revelation fork. I would have ended up still spending a grand more on a pike and monarch. If the higher priced version has the parts you want get it. It did not have what I wanted so I got the lower cost bike and will choose my parts and at what rate I want to pay for them. Just another thought process. Do what works for you

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