Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    49

    Looking to upgrade bikes to FS

    I currently own a Scott Scale 720 27.5 hardtail from 2015 and I love the bike however I'm looking to upgrade to something newer. Most of my riding is on flat ground, because of the area that I live, but I do venture out several times a year to various trails.

    Recently I came across money after selling quite a bit of things and was thinking about getting a full suspension bike in the $3k-$4k range that would be able to handle flat ground as well as lots of roots from time to time. The thing I'm most curious about is the drivetrain on these newer bikes are mostly 1x12 and I currently am running a 2x11 (I believe), most of my daily riding is in that higher front gear as I am on the flat ground. How are those 1x12 gearsets?

    What bikes are worth looking at? Where I live there's not too many bike shops that are familiar with mountain bikes as I live near the coast but we do have Trek, Scott, Specialized, and Santa Cruz dealers around. What bikes are worth looking at for that pricerange?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nauc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    2,908
    i read someone saying get a bike with a 1x12 (or 1x11), but run a 2x crankset with no front d. then if you ever have to climb a crazy steep hill, switch down to the small ring up front by hand

    i thought that was pretty damn smart, if it will work

    the Stumpjumpers look pretty badass. new ones have threaded bottom brackets too! BOUT TIME !

    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/bi...false&show=All

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    324
    Can you tell us a little bit more about your riding? It sounds like you're looking for a pretty typical mountain bike to do general purpose stuff and not something extra burly or extra light, yes? If so the 110-130mm travel range ought to suit you well, and ought to be an improvement in most regards to the Scale without being too big a departure.

    Based on what you said, my recommendations from:
    Specialized--Old Camber (recently phased out) or the new Stumpjumper ST. 29er should roll better, but 27.5 should handle better and weigh less. You might have to wait for the new ST, but on the other hand you might be able to get a good deal on an in-stock Camber since they're now "old". At this point I definitely wouldn't pay sticker for one personally, but they're great bikes.

    Santa Cruz--Tallboy in a 29er, or 5010 in a 27.5. Your budget puts you in a high end Alu kit or a lower end Carbon. Both are good, that's largely a preference for mechanicals vs. frame. The 5010 would be a little bit more burly than a Camber.

    I'd rather not comment on Trek or Scott since I'm not super familiar with their lineups, but I do know that they have great options too.

    Quote Originally Posted by nauc View Post
    i thought that was pretty damn smart, if it will work
    It should work, but there's two minor issues:
    1. chainline on a proper 1x will be better
    2. without a narrow-wide or FD, you'd probably deal with chain drops. NW could work though you'd just have to be careful when "shifting" back up.

    Anyway, for OPs budget might be able to get into a GX Eagle 1x12. The big cog on the eagle stuff is comically large and can go surprisingly low.
    Little Bear: SC Superlight 29 | Goldilocks' Bear: Evil The Calling | Big Bear: SC Butcher

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    49
    Sorry for taking so long to get back with you. I will be getting money shortly to purchase the bike and I will likely be renting something this month to make my decision easier.

    My main riding is on flat "road like" paved trails which is about 14.1mi on a daily basis. I tend to ride pretty briskly on flat surfaces.

    Maybe once every 2 weeks I go and ride more actual beginner type trails, here in the south east, nothing too difficult. Most of them are very moist dirt with lots of tree roots, not as many rocks.

    I do have a trip coming up where I'm headed for a weekend trip to ride some trails and I'm looking to rent a full suspension bike to test out. I believe this shop carries a Rocky Mountain Pipeline, not too familiar with those but they look decent.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    324
    For brisk riding on paved trails and some easy mountain bike trails, you're probably going to prefer more XC oriented than what I listed, with a lockout or strong damping on the rear shock. Something like a Specialized Epic or Santa Cruz Blur. Those are going to be 29ers (most XC bikes are); if you like the 27.5 wheel size, most of the options in the segment are a little "burlier" as trail bikes, but there are a few short travel 27.5 bikes. Basically, having too much or too squishy travel will cut away from the power you're putting down on a tarmac or flat straights, and if you're doing a lot of that I wouldn't want it to be cumbersome.

    For that reason, if you're open to it, I think it would be worth your time to try out a nice 29er hardtail in addition to some FS bikes. 3-4k is plenty for a FS bike, and it would get a really nice hardtail. But if you are set on a FS that's fine too; I have 3 fullies and only 1 HT so I certainly get the appeal.

    Oh, and your question on gearing. You'll likely want to gear up the chainring if you go for a 1x. The 10T cog helps a bit, but if you're spending most of your time at speed you could probably benefit from a 34T or even 36T chainring up front. I'd discuss it with your LBS, they might be able to swap that as part of the deal. With the super large rear cog on a 1x12, you'll still have quite a bit of low range for hills.
    Little Bear: SC Superlight 29 | Goldilocks' Bear: Evil The Calling | Big Bear: SC Butcher

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    49
    That's kinda what I figured would be mentioned. I am used to 27.5 now and it used to be a requirement based upon me being able to transport it (didn't have the space for a 29er) but now I think I'm good.

    If I were going to go HT again I'd probably swing for the carbon based ones so it's more shock absorbing. The older I get the less I want to deal with all the hit on that back tire traversing up to my rear.

    I haven't looked at too many of the higher end XC's yet I just want to make sure the bike can handle EVERYTHING I would ride around here. The Trek Fuel series seems very nice too, I'd like to take a look at the higher end ones of those.

    The gearing thing I will certainly need to speak to the LBS about and ask their opinion.





    Quote Originally Posted by ghost_03 View Post
    For brisk riding on paved trails and some easy mountain bike trails, you're probably going to prefer more XC oriented than what I listed, with a lockout or strong damping on the rear shock. Something like a Specialized Epic or Santa Cruz Blur. Those are going to be 29ers (most XC bikes are); if you like the 27.5 wheel size, most of the options in the segment are a little "burlier" as trail bikes, but there are a few short travel 27.5 bikes. Basically, having too much or too squishy travel will cut away from the power you're putting down on a tarmac or flat straights, and if you're doing a lot of that I wouldn't want it to be cumbersome.

    For that reason, if you're open to it, I think it would be worth your time to try out a nice 29er hardtail in addition to some FS bikes. 3-4k is plenty for a FS bike, and it would get a really nice hardtail. But if you are set on a FS that's fine too; I have 3 fullies and only 1 HT so I certainly get the appeal.

    Oh, and your question on gearing. You'll likely want to gear up the chainring if you go for a 1x. The 10T cog helps a bit, but if you're spending most of your time at speed you could probably benefit from a 34T or even 36T chainring up front. I'd discuss it with your LBS, they might be able to swap that as part of the deal. With the super large rear cog on a 1x12, you'll still have quite a bit of low range for hills.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    324
    Quote Originally Posted by narcispy
    I haven't looked at too many of the higher end XC's yet I just want to make sure the bike can handle EVERYTHING I would ride around here. The Trek Fuel series seems very nice too, I'd like to take a look at the higher end ones of those.
    Totally. Ultimately there's going to be some level of compromise since trails and tarmac are so different. Best thing is to look at stuff and ride stuff and see what works for you.


    Quote Originally Posted by narcispy View Post
    The gearing thing I will certainly need to speak to the LBS about and ask their opinion.
    Awesome, definitely the way to go there.
    Little Bear: SC Superlight 29 | Goldilocks' Bear: Evil The Calling | Big Bear: SC Butcher

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    49
    If I had to pick between renting anything at the moment for what I would like to have it would be the cheaper Santa Cruz 5010 carbon model so that's what I'm considering renting the end of the month while on break.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    63
    The Scott Spark & Genius come with twin lock, you can lock out the suspension with a lever on the handlebars for when riding paved trails and unlock it when you hit the trails. They have many models set up nicely within your price range. I picked up a Scott Spark 750 last year for under $2400. It is equipped nicely and an absolute blast to ride. Very nimble on the trails. Plus they make them in both 27.5 & 29 versions.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sturge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    599
    I would go with XC type as well (smaller travel) and choose bigger front ring to dial things in for your terrain. A little math using your existing setup will tell you what ratio's are in your wheelhouse. Does not appear a dropper is needed so you could save some $ skipping that.

    Also...are you running tubeless? Allows running at lower pressures which makes a difference in how the tire absorbs small trail imperfections and dampens out vibrations. Correct tires/tubeless setup for your application will likely have more of an effect on dampening vibration than spending the extra $ on a carbon frame. The actual weight difference between same bike with alu vs carbon is small.
    07 Kona Dawg Supreme
    12 Santa Cruz Heckler
    18 Kona Process 153 AL/DL (27.5)...

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    833
    Instead of spending thousands on another bike, I recommend you keep the bike you have and just buy this frame for $1200
    https://intensecycles.com/products/2017-spider-frame

    It's one of the best frames available in the 115-130mm range, and all your components fit. 27.5, boost hubs, BB92 crank.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 09-23-2015, 06:51 PM
  2. Bikes stolen :( Looking for new bikes......help!
    By canadianbrah in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 06-05-2014, 02:20 AM
  3. To Upgrade or Not to Upgrade... looking for some advice.
    By Adca1220 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-14-2013, 09:22 PM
  4. Upgrade the HT or upgrade to a FS?
    By Dwhitt1981 in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-02-2011, 08:39 AM

Members who have read this thread: 73

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.