Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    3

    Buying advice...

    I haven't been on a mountain bike for years and nothing decent at that. I'm a roadie - go easy - who wants to hit some trails too, so I am looking for advice. I don't race - just want something reliable I can beat on some.

    Options I am looking at:

    2018 Salsa Timberjack NX1 27.5

    2017 Cannondale Trail 2

    Trek Roscoe 8

    Framed Marquette X5

    Trying to stay around $1000 or less.

    Cannondale is cheapest because of model year, but is non-boost and has QR instead of thru axle. Not sure if that makes the Salsa worth the extra with the lesser fork. Also, the Salsa is a single up front which I like the idea of. Trek is most expensive. Trek and Salsa seem pretty similar except the Trek has the dropper post which I am not sure is worth the extra money right now. Framed is more affordable but with a 9 speed cassette. Nothing hardcore all mountain. Single track and downhill. Keeping my fitness up because I don't relish 50 mph descents on the road in cold weather. Other options are appreciated. Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    3
    Man, ya get no advice... I bought a Roscoe 8. Liking it so far after the first ride. It jumps the chain off the top of the cassette and I don't know a lot about SRAM limit adjustment. Don't want to load it up to take it back to the shop for adjustment. I'm used to the typical Shimano limit screws on a road bike. Anybody tell me how to adjust the limit down by chance?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    450
    The dropper post is absolutely worth the little bit of extra cost. My vote out of those would go to the Trek.

  4. #4
    Bikesexual
    Reputation: jcd46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,786
    Quote Originally Posted by OmegaMountain View Post
    Man, ya get no advice... I bought a Roscoe 8. Liking it so far after the first ride. It jumps the chain off the top of the cassette and I don't know a lot about SRAM limit adjustment. Don't want to load it up to take it back to the shop for adjustment. I'm used to the typical Shimano limit screws on a road bike. Anybody tell me how to adjust the limit down by chance?
    Maybe in the Trek Forum? Or General, try posting your question there.
    The Orange Fleet:

    '16 SC Heckler
    '14 All City MMD
    '12 Kona Unit Rigid

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: djevox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    224
    Quote Originally Posted by jgdblue View Post
    The dropper post is absolutely worth the little bit of extra cost. My vote out of those would go to the Trek.
    I thought dropper post was bs until I got one. Itís by far the best thing I have put on my bike.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    259
    Droppers definitely help in technical stuff and as a roadie you'll need it . I don't know a lot about these bikes but for entry level MTB make sure it fits well and has a good tubliss tire setup and you'll be just fine. Tires make a huge difference and stock ones aren't always great. You can endlessly try different things but you'll never be far off running something like a 2.35 nobby nic speedgrip.

    The limit screws on my sram mech work just like those on everything else I've had as far as I can recall. On mine iirc the outside screw sets the inside limit and vice versa. Mine I'd a Xo1 11spd.

    Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    3
    I'm going to run tubes for the time being. The dropper is nice for descending. My skills on technical climbs are what is lacking. Wet leaves in the rain yesterday didn't help. The limit adjust screws are less obvious than the ones on a Shimano road rear derailleur and that's why I ask. I like the Roscoe so far and the only addition at this point might be the remote lockout for the fork. The plus tires seem to give plenty of compliance over the rough stuff to compensate for the hard tail frame. I like the single up front too - still have plenty of high gear speed with the 11 cog cassette and less things to worry about with no front derailleur. It's a lot of bike for the money. Put a set of Saint platforms on it and need to get a decent pair of shoes.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    121
    Here is the Sram manual for adjusting your low limit screw. Page 10.

    https://sram-cdn-pull-zone-gsdesign....r_manual_0.pdf

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    3,163
    SRAM adjustment
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anZIgnxpCbw

    There are several videos on youtube.

Similar Threads

  1. New Rider - Buying New VS. Buying Used - Question
    By Ryan's Law in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 05-14-2015, 07:33 AM
  2. Buying used - How to avoid buying a stolen bike?
    By shinbone in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 05-28-2014, 08:31 AM
  3. Specialized Hardrock Buying Advice Needed!!
    By KnSk in forum Specialized
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-17-2011, 08:27 AM
  4. buying first bike need advice
    By nwrider71 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-11-2011, 03:58 PM
  5. ok Im thinking about buying. I need advice.
    By joshman108 in forum Fat bikes
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-08-2011, 07:32 PM

Members who have read this thread: 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.