Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Beiou 27.5

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    158

    Beiou 27.5


  2. #2
    Afric Pepperbird
    Reputation: dirt farmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    4,752
    Where do you live?

    I've never heard of half those component brands. I'd spend that money on a name brand, i.e. Trek, Giant, etc., and just skip carbon altogether. You can do much better with aluminum in the brands I've mentioned.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    158
    I am in Oklahoma. Like to ride to and from work/class but still have good off road capability.
    I want hydraulic brakes for sure. I was looking at the rigid because I ride mostly road. Lots of hills in my area also so the 21 lb bike is intriguing.
    Last edited by Kevin Van Deventer; 01-31-2015 at 02:14 AM.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Clicker1's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    195
    Good luck getting any warranty issues addressed.

  5. #5
    Lone Wolf
    Reputation: Osco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,679
    Carbon fiber for $900 !

    I would not go there, cheap carbon is,,,well,,,cheap carbon.

    For $900 you can get a reliable Aluminum hart tail with a proven track record, some history and have better components.

    Trek, Giant, Scott, etc.
    “I seek only the Flow”,
    Climbing Is Supposed To Be Hard,
    Shut Up Legs :P

  6. #6
    Land of the 230+
    Reputation: GuitsBoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    2,213
    The brakes and shifters are so so, but I worry that the fork and wheels might be crap. The dont look familiar at all in the aftermarket world.

    If you're able to build a bike yourself, you're probably better off starting with one of the popular chinese carbon frames. At least those have a fairly good track record. If you look for deals, you can probably get it done for close to the $1000 mark, and at least youll know exactly what components you have, even if they wont be top shelf.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    12
    Not sure about a complete bike, but I own a set of the BEIOU carbon bars. They are constructed very well. I didn't realize when i ordered that they were the 31.8 clamp size, so I went to my local Trek dealer to get a new stem. A couple of the hard core MTB riders working in the back came out to investigate. Everyone in the shop was thoroughly impressed with the construction and weight. I paid $40 bucks for these and I have been quite happy. I'll probably order a hardtail frame to replace one of my older vintage Caloi Team frames from the early 90's in a few months once I have the cash. If you look around, you will find some pretty stellar reviews on them by some of the better review sites on the web. Again, I haven't seen one in person, but if the handle bars are any indication of the quality of the frames, then I would say it will likely live up to the abuse that 75% of the riders out there dish out. Just my 2 cents.... On the flip side, as one poster said above, warranty might be a completely different issue. But for a hard tail carbon frame for under $500, I'm probably gonna give one a try and see.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by TJ A Jones View Post
    ...the BEIOU carbon bars. They are constructed very well.
    Just saw this - construction is part of carbon fiber but testing is absolutely critical. Carbon fiber can fail catastrophically with out warning. Companies like Easton conduct extensive testing on their products and I would be willing to risk my head and teeth with them but not Beiou, to many unknowns. An ER visit is ~$1500 with good insurance...

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by otb-klunker View Post
    Just saw this - construction is part of carbon fiber but testing is absolutely critical.
    Yes, and so is knowing who built your bike so you what kind of critical care was taken. :-)

    Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but if you are riding a Carbon Specialized, Giant, Santa Cruz, etc., or other major brand carbon bike brands, chances are the carbon frame was fabricated and made in Taiwan by Giant Cycle Corporation, the largest OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) of carbon frames in the world. Yup, your $7000 FSR Carbon enduro was birthed in Asia.

    Furthermore, like the Beiou, the afore mentioned bikes are built with Toray Carbon Fiber, which, if you have every flown in a jumbo jet, you've risked your live to their product. Matter of fact, they are the largest supplier of high grade carbon and have aero-space contracts abroad. The USA subsidiary is located in Texas. Look them up when you have time.

    Even more interesting, Donguan Taihe is the company which is the middle man supplier for your carbon, matte resins, etc., to the Giant Cyclery and other OEMs in Asia

    So lets talk construction. The industry standard in bikes, specifically for frames is a 3K matte. Sometimes components with less stress will be 2K or 2500, but because the mass purchasing power is on the 3K, it's the most widely used. There are technically 4 ways to construct a carbon frame, but most all of them are built in foam core injected or bladder injection/vacuum mold. Basically, it's done by machines for the most part.... Yup, not only was that $7000 FSR built in Taiwan, but there were not any techs in lab coats or geeks in resin resistant gloves doing carbon-resin layers over time. The parts are machined cut from the matte for accuracy, placed in a mold, and the bladder or foam core + vacuum and resin injection takes care of the rest. It goes from raw material to formed frame in about 30 minutes.

    In all fairness, I can not at this point confirm which factory BEIOU is manufacture in, but I am willing to bet it is extremely and highly probable they are being manufactured in Giant's factory or one of the neighboring OEM houses which would still be a quality controlled facility and producing name brand bikes for the USA.

    If you really want to know why your popular name brand carbon ride is crazy $$$$, do a little research on all the exchanges that happen between middle men before the bike gets to US soil. Quite and interesting. Then go further and look and the exchanges once the bike hits port and then is distributed through the channels and finally lands in your local shop. A lot of inflation happens there as well.

    The sporting goods industry as a whole has some considerable price jacking by distribution companies, depending on the product. Territories and locking out competitors and new companies on the scene happens quite a lot as well, especially since a global market for this opened up in the mid-late 90's. Bikes aren't the only products that suffer.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ja001son's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    231
    I have this bike, and I ride the hell out of it, jumps, drops, etc etc.


    Im 6'1 #220 (and dropping)

    The frame is excellent, and considering what I have put it through, plenty strong.

    I have upgraded the following:

    Stock seat was not great

    Switch to a 1x10 setup, but the stock setup worked just fine, just not my thing.

    The fork is "ok" its an air fork with lockout, but there is no rebound adjustment. It would probably be ok for a lighter rider, but I swapped to a 120mm Rockshox 30 Gold TK.

    Switched to a shorter stem and wider bar but thats just a personal preference, nothing was wrong with the stock stuff.

    Stock tires are meh.. depends on terrain.

    Stock wheels work fine tubeless with stans tape, actually they work GREAT, I have practically ZERO leak down, something like 2 pounds a week best I can tell, practically nothing. I did have to do a little truing on the front one because it was a bit bent, but that could have happened during shipping.

    I think its a really good bike right out of the box, ESPECIALLY at the price point, and with a few upgrades, especially a better fork it is a GREAT bike.

    I often get asked "what" it is by other riders, and I tell them I bought it from amazon, and that I don't know how to pronounce the name.. odd looks.

    Everyone that picks it up is shocked by how light it is, and yes it is SUPER light, it was kind of spooky when I was first putting it through its paces and pushing it harder and harder because it just feels weird that something so light can be so strong.


    The whole "questionable carbon fiber" mess, "get a brand name bike"

    Yea I have a brand name bike too, A Giant Trance X, bought at the local bike shop... where was its frame made? China.


    That said, confidence is a real thing that actually effects riding, so if you have the extra truly disposable income and paying more for the brand recognition makes you tingle the right way, go for it.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ja001son's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    231
    Here is mine as it currently sits.

    Beiou 27.5-20160802_190516.jpgBeiou 27.5-20160802_190524.jpgBeiou 27.5-20160802_190530.jpgBeiou 27.5-20160802_190537.jpg


    Upgraded fork to a 120mm Gold TK

    1x10 setup with a guide

    Wider bars, shorter stem

    Tubless

    Mallet 2 pedals.

    I was worried being a "noname bike" that figuring out what fits what would be a problem, but so far that has been a complete non issue.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    2
    Your bike looks great. I have the same bike. I have been looking for a new fork but most are tapered. The junky UDING fork that came with it is a non-tapered steerer type. Is the Rockshox Gold TK a tapered or non-tapered steerer? If tapered did you have to add some conversion parts to get it to fit?

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    839
    Quote Originally Posted by dmoyer75 View Post
    Your bike looks great. I have the same bike.
    Your frame is already designed for tapered forks. You don't need to put conversion parts on, you need to take conversion parts off of it and replace the lower bearing with a standard tapered bearing and crown race.

    BTW, I assembled parts onto a BEIOU 26" frame, and the quality has been excellent.

  14. #14
    Barely in control
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,262
    How is the tire clearance in the rear on that BEIOU 26", MudSnow?

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    2
    Thanks. I was beginning to suspect that. Wanted to make sure before I make the big purchase.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    1
    I know this an old post, but I am glad I found it. I've been considering the BEIOU 3K Carbon Fiber MTB Frame for building a new 26 as well. The reviews from actual owners of this frame seem pretty good and the price is too. I already have a whole XT M8000 groupset to put on it when I decide to build it.


    Quote Originally Posted by MudSnow View Post
    Your frame is already designed for tapered forks. You don't need to put conversion parts on, you need to take conversion parts off of it and replace the lower bearing with a standard tapered bearing and crown race.

    BTW, I assembled parts onto a BEIOU 26" frame, and the quality has been excellent.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    839
    That is exactly the one I got, with the green and white paint.

    It comes with a 1 1/2" lower bearing but a 1 1/8" crown race adapter. You just have to buy a new crown race. I recommend Cane Creek's 40-Series Steel 52/40 1.5 Crown Race. It has a nice rubber seal to keep out dirt.

    Beiou 27.5-71iqoawdqll._sl1500_.jpg

    Name:  s-l300.jpg
Views: 947
Size:  10.8 KB

    .


    .
    Last edited by MudSnow; 02-07-2018 at 07:11 PM.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    839
    I wouldn't buy a complete Beiou bike, because they put junk components on it, but the frames are really nice.
    https://www.amazon.com/BEIOU-Mountai...LNU/ref=sr_1_4

    Beiou 27.5-7103xftjyil._sl1500_.jpg

Members who have read this thread: 33

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.