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Thread: Titanium

  1. #1
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    Titanium

    So, I'm thinking about a Carver Killer B. Is there any real difference between the Ti they use on Carver's bikes (Chinese) and US Ti that they use on Moots, Merlins etc?

  2. #2
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    ti

    good question.

  3. #3
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    Or would that be.....

    Quote Originally Posted by oldbikeshop
    good question.
    .....thai? Is a good question on quality although I haven't heard of any problems with the Carvers.

    Back to the titainium, loved my Moots. Thinking there was enough room to run a 650b on the back of my YBB using a W.I. ecc hub......d'oh why did I sell it! That would have been one SSweet mid-size wheeler!

  4. #4
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    IIRC Carvers are straight gauge vs butted tubes on the Moots.

  5. #5
    nothing relevant to say
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    OK, this may be irrelavant...
    I was reading about 4130 Grade Chromoly a few years ago, and the comparision between Chinese grade and USA Military Spec grade. I guess in the USA we have a higher standard to what we will call true 4130, as opposed to Chinese 4130, with a higher lever of carbon and zinc. SO, what I am trying to get at is that the Ti grade could be same, but not truly, metallurgically speaking.
    My 2cents, probably worthless....

  6. #6
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    The guys over on the framebuilders forum might know more...

  7. #7
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    Grade of the Ti might be slightly different in terms of the alloyed content
    Bigger concern is proper purging of the area which they apparently have problems with.

    Improper tube prep and welding techniques leave impurities and flaws in the weld areas and will affect the structure as a whole.
    This seems to be the most common problem with ChiTi.
    (although there are always pics where the tubing itself of, say a fork leg, just flat out ruptured away from the welds)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cracked Headtube
    OK, this may be irrelavant...
    I was reading about 4130 Grade Chromoly a few years ago, and the comparision between Chinese grade and USA Military Spec grade. I guess in the USA we have a higher standard to what we will call true 4130, as opposed to Chinese 4130, with a higher lever of carbon and zinc. SO, what I am trying to get at is that the Ti grade could be same, but not truly, metallurgically speaking.
    My 2cents, probably worthless....
    Not worthless, pretty much spot on. I'm not that familiar with titanium, but believe the same premise can be applied between US spec titanium and tubing from China. In order to be considered 4130, the alloying materials have to fall within a certain percentage range. Some of the Taiwanese/Chinese tubing I've had tested can be considered "4130" but the content of certain alloying materials just barely makes it in the range. Aircraft grade is different, in that is is certified in its high quality.

    Here's some good info on titanium: http://www.steelforge.com/titaniumalloys.htm

    This is an excellent reference for metallurgy for the cyclist written by Scot Nicol 15 years ago: http://www.ibiscycles.com/tech/materials_101/1/

  9. #9
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    I think another question to raise would be where does US ti tubing come from? Unlike steel I think even the US based Ti tubing companies like Reynolds source raw materials from overseas. I would suspect that the differnces and primary area of concern is what byknuts pointed out, fabrication technique.

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