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  1. #1
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    Some 650b/ 69er Images from Outdoor Demo East

    I attended the Outdoor Demo East in Providence today and had a good time. Wish I could have stayed longer, but I was able to do some short but really fun test rides on some cool 650b bikes and 69ers. Good times. Many thanks to Davis Carver for all his help.

    Here's some images for you guys and gals to ponder over. I'll write more later when I gather my thoughts.

    First Up - New Belt Drive Carver single speed Ti 69er!!! Cool stuff. I rode this thing a bit and it was definitely miles of smiles.







    The Nevegal is getting closer to being available. Sweet looking tire - especially for the Northeast IMO.







    You are probably wondering why this 29er is in this thread:



    Well it is the OS Bikes Black Buck 29er - but Mark Slate - the man behind OS Bikes - also has this frame in a 650b platform size too. According to the WTB rep at the show, Mark is very supportive of the 650b wheelsize.

    Carver 69er frame in 650b clothing! This bike featured a really cool annodized color that they were calling Mocha - it was sort of chameleon like, dark brown, black, bronze - pretty neat. I rode it!







    For those of you pining for a Steel Carver - well now you can have it. This puppy was built using Columbus Life Tubing and was really sweet.





    I rode this Haro Beasley 1x9 - and it was stellar! Very fun bike IMO. If I were Haro I'd include a N-Gear Jump stop to the spec though just in case.






    The paint schemes on the Haros are even sweeter in person than they are on the web or in print.

    The SS Beasley is really more of a dark silver metallic color vs. the black that we've seen online. Gorgeous!






    I gotta say that Davis Carver and his crew are super cool folks and Davis is doing some really great stuff with his Carver offerings.

    I also spoke with Downhill Jill from Haro and she was super nice, and very friendly. The Beasleys were a hot item today in Providence. I rode the 1x9 and loved it. I now want to get on the SS and try that out set up with those Mary Bars!

    Hope you guys enjoy this. Sorry about the lackluster photo quality. My camera is old and the camera man lacks photography skills. But I figured a little taste is better than nothing right!?

    Oh yeah - if there is for sure room on a Marin Quad FS frameset for the 650bs - holy crap - buy one and convert it. That suspension design kicks all kinds of ass!

    And for those wondering about room in a Scott Spark - I snapped this little chainstay clearance pic for you:



    Hope you enjoy some of these pics.

    Cheers,

    Mark
    Last edited by MMcG; 10-22-2008 at 10:13 AM.

  2. #2
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    More Random Thoughts from yesterday:

    1. The XFusion Velvet fork - works really well. Great value in that fork for those of you on the fence about it - I say give it a go.

    2. Again as I think about the Beasley this morning - I'd love to try one with a Velvet in front for a little cush. The rigid fork is really nice - don't get me wrong whatsoever - but it would be cool to ride that steel frame with a nice simple yet effective suspension fork in front.

    3. The Nevegal will truly be a great 650b tire choice for many I predict. I hope Kenda makes it available real soon.

    4. I don't think I'd opt for a Heckler (Beckler) conversion after riding the Marin Quad FS suspension design back to back agains the Santa Cruz single pivot design. The Marin blew the doors off the Heckler in terms of ride quality.

    Cheers,

    Mark

  3. #3
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    Thanks Mark.
    How did the 69er with 650b ride? Any chance to directly compare it to the Carver set up as 69? The steel Carver is interesting but tire clearance looks a bit tight in the rear.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelbike
    Thanks Mark.
    How did the 69er with 650b ride? Any chance to directly compare it to the Carver set up as 69? The steel Carver is interesting but tire clearance looks a bit tight in the rear.
    The 69er rode fine with the 650bs! I'd run a Quasi in back though if I were to use that frame. Clearance was tight with the Neomoto - but it fit and if you were riding in dry climates it'd get the job done. But yeah, a Quasi rear/Neomoto front would be the ideal configuration for that frame.

    Comparing it to the 69er - I'd say I would prefer the dual 650b set up for a more balanced feel both front and back especially at my 5'9" height.


    The steel Carver 69er featured paragon sliders, so that photo I took is with the sliders all the way forward. Slide em back a little and you'll have more room. In fact, that frame would probably be an excellent 650b compatible frame now that I think of it.

    Hope this helps!

    Mark

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the pics and writeup. Can you compare the ride and handling of the 650b Carver vs. the 1X9 Beasely?

  6. #6
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    Sure can.

    The Carver - was a 17" frame and it was a little bit small for me. With that said it was very quick with the Velvet set at 100mm of travel, and it was a pretty lightweight package. I had to get used to the mechanical disc brakes, which were also not fully broken in yet, but it was quick to accelerate and steer. The aluminum frame was a little bit on the "harsh" side compared to the steel framed Haro.

    The Haro I rode was an 18" frame and the fit was improved from the 17" Carver (roomier cockpit if you will). I'm 5'9" tall and I've found I prefer a longer TT/short stem type of set up on my bikes.

    The Beasley was very precise in terms of steering quality and I felt that the rigid fork was good - and not overly stiff/harsh. Although the dirt test loop was really short and not at all technical in nature, so take my fork comments with that in mind. It rode - well it rode like a nice bike should. I wish there were more technical trail features to ride over/through in order to have a chance to compare and contrast the different wheelsizes I rode on Tuesday, but that wasn't the case.

    I hope they do Interbike East again and I hope they do it in the Northeast - but at a location that would allow for a more rigorous testing grounds for mountain bikes. The park featured a nice low traffic area for road bike and/or urban, hybrid bike testers, but the ability to truly test mountain bikes in the elements they were designed for was lacking at this site.

    IMO the steel frame was the nicer "feeling" of the two bikes. But I have a preference for steel over AL. With that said, both bikes handled exceptionally well in terms of quickness, steering, and overall put a smile on your face factor! It was cool to be able to wheelie a bike without having to think or work to hard to get it done (which is what I'm faced with on 29ers to a certain extent at my height/bike riding ability level).

    Carver is now having steel frames built, so with Carver you could have hte option of converting an AL 96er frame and using the ebb to set geometry to your liking, you have the ability to go Titanium (and customize it) and now you have a third steel (Columbus tubing choices) option which makes for quite an array of options.

    The Beasley I rode was the 1x9 version and although I didn't have any chain drop issues, others I talked with had a few cases of the chain jumping off hte front ring in certain gear combos. I would think that adding an N-Gear Jumpstop or some type of simple chain catcher would be a good investment either by Haro or by a purchaser if they were to go the Beasley 1x9 route.



    I should have ridden both bikes a little bit longer to compare the wheelsets featured on both. The Carver utilized Velocity Blunt rims with Neomotos, and the Haro used the OEM Weinmann rims with Neomotos.

    That Neomoto is one kick butt tire I gotta say that.

    And the OEM wrims on the Haro didn't feel weak or noodly or flexy in any way to my 180 pound body weight.


    Hope that is helpful feedback for you.

    Both Haro and Carver are backed up by really cool people who love bikes - so you couldn't go wrong either way with that aspect!

    Cheers,

    Mark

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveF
    Thanks for the pics and writeup. Can you compare the ride and handling of the 650b Carver vs. the 1X9 Beasely?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMcG
    ...Hope that is helpful feedback for you...
    Mark

    Thanks, Mark-helpful indeed! Steel would be my preference for a hardtail, too, so the new Carver option is interesting. I'd probably put a Velvet on either one (I can't imagine going back to a rigid fork) and likely swap to a standard triple with front derailer for the Haro...so it sounds as though either one would be a good choice.

  8. #8
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    Indeed they are both nice. I would say that with a Carver - I'd opt for either a Ti Killer B or the steel offering. Especially if you live/ride in wet/muddy conditions.

    The 96er frame is workable - but not optimal in terms of rear tire clearance.

    Again, the velvet fork impressed me.

  9. #9
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    Just wanted to let interested folks know, I corresponded with Davis at Carver and evidently, the steel bike was a one-off and the cost was so close to that of the ti frame that they don't plan to build it in steel. So if you want a Killer B, the ti one's it...

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the great write up Mark!

    Beautiful bikes!

  11. #11
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    My pleasure derby!

    It was a fun day.

  12. #12
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    96er belt

    It doesn't look like the carver frame can seperate, what happens if the belt breaks?

  13. #13
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    Bolt on Driveside dropout

    I didn't post the photo initially, but there is a bolt that fits on the driveside dropout that allows for enough separation to install and remove the belt. Here is a blurry photo of it:


    It was really cool to see in person and according to Davis allows for a really stiff dropout area for the belt drive frame.

    HOpe that helps!

    Mark
    Quote Originally Posted by dbocon
    It doesn't look like the carver frame can seperate, what happens if the belt breaks?

  14. #14
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    Wow

    That Haro Beasley SS brings me back to my first MTB. A black 1997 Haro Vector V0 I got when I was 13. I learned how to ride on that bike. The Beasley has so much in common; color, top tube dip (Haro special), rigid CrMo frame and fork. If I find one in my size I'm going to buy it.

  15. #15
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    According to a thread in the Haro forum, they're getting spoke for fast--if you seriously want one might be a good idea to have your dealer order one up...

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