View Poll Results: Would you buy some 36er tires?

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  • Heck no.

    128 54.24%
  • I'll take one (unicyclist)

    12 5.08%
  • I'd buy a set for my bike.

    65 27.54%
  • I'd buy multiple sets, for my bike/uni, and to support the project

    31 13.14%
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  1. #126
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    Looks good. Has someone already addressed light strong rims?
    Strong already exists: Nimbus 36" Stealth2 Rim with Braking Surface

    Light? I have tacoed one of these rims, they are not that strong, go much lighter and they'll fold.

  2. #127
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    Ben: depends on the metal they are made out of. As you are aware, there are plenty of 'light weight' rims available that are considerably lighter than their cheap counterpart. Think something like a Wally World 29er rim vs a Stans Flow. I've bent and repaired the Nimbus stealth rims, they are a pretty soft alloy.

    I need to try the Stealth 2. It does look to be a stronger shape.

  3. #128
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    I need to try the Stealth 2. It does look to be a stronger shape.
    I'm ordering one right now, I'll post a review

    It's so easy to spend money, anyoen else notice that

  4. #129
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    ... and if we just ...

    Been riding the "protos" a couple weeks now first thing you'll notice is that they a true
    mountain bike tread the side knobs are widely spaced and hook up well and the center
    knobs are ramped to help with rolling resistence they are lighter than both the Nimbus
    Cokers. I'm excited and cant wait for the production ones I may end up with a stable
    full of 36er bikes I might even try and make a full suspension.
    PAYASO 36er.....Live the Circus

  5. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I'm ordering one right now, I'll post a review

    It's so easy to spend money, anyone else notice that
    Easy come easy go...

  6. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by modifier View Post
    Looks good. Has someone already addressed light strong rims?
    We have been searching without much luck, but have a couple new leads. Ideally we'd find a company that would make AND sell them so we don't have to take on another project like this and the monetary risks involved.

    Any ideas on who to try? All of the big guys have said no.

  7. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbeardsl View Post
    ...they even did well in ~6" sand from one of the testers.
    Interesting. My back yard trail has sandy spots, and I have preferred riding my fat bike ever since I got in a fairly bad accident involving sand, a creek bridge, and moving kinda fast. But sometimes the bike is overkill. I'd like to have a fast bike that I can plow into a section of sand at speed and not feel anxious.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  8. #133
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    Sand is tricky. In a lot of ways, it's like driving on ice. It's about keeping your cadence up and not fighting the bike or changing things too much. If you fight it, slow quickly, speed up quickly or try to change direction quickly, you will lose. You just gotta let the bike go in the general direction it wants once you're in the sand.

  9. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad Bedell View Post
    Sand is tricky. In a lot of ways, it's like driving on ice. It's about keeping your cadence up and not fighting the bike or changing things too much. If you fight it, slow quickly, speed up quickly or try to change direction quickly, you will lose. You just gotta let the bike go in the general direction it wants once you're in the sand.
    True.

    Imagine I am saying the following in a polite tone, which I am sincere about: I don't care, and don't want to deal with any of that. The more I can mitigate it, the better. And I've done that... at the cost of rolling efficiency. If I can get the best of both worlds, great!
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  10. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    True.

    Imagine I am saying the following in a polite tone, which I am sincere about: I don't care, and don't want to deal with any of that. The more I can mitigate it, the better. And I've done that... at the cost of rolling efficiency. If I can get the best of both worlds, great!
    Oh, I agree! I've often transversed over dead trees than run through 100' of a sand pit. Fat tires would almost make sand fun. The 36er does better than my 29er or even a 26" bike with around a 2.25" width. I'm guessing the leverage of the tire, but then again it could be all mental or a product of the slower responding bike that forgives my input.

  11. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbeardsl View Post
    We have been searching without much luck, but have a couple new leads. Ideally we'd find a company that would make AND sell them so we don't have to take on another project like this and the monetary risks involved.

    Any ideas on who to try? All of the big guys have said no.
    No I wish I did because I may need to have some made too. Completely different project.

  12. #137
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    Looking at floatation from a volume perspective (which in my experience is pretty analogous) a 36x2.25 tire will be approximately equal in total volume to a 26x2.7.

    Not fatbike floatation but with a better angle of attack.

  13. #138
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    Rode the "Protos" in Prescott this weekend at the Granite Basin trail system they
    worked extremely well the out of saddle traction is excellent. Very good tread pattern
    groomed trails.
    PAYASO 36er.....Live the Circus

  14. #139
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Light? I have tacoed one of these rims, they are not that strong, go much lighter and they'll fold.
    ...Maybe you are on a unicycle?

    DirtySixer36er, Ventana ElCapitan, Soma Smoothie 66cm, Trek T100, ChoiceCollective36er.
    DirtySixer
    36er

  15. #140
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    We have been searching without much luck, but have a couple new leads. Ideally we'd find a company that would make AND sell them so we don't have to take on another project like this and the monetary risks involved.

    Any ideas on who to try? All of the big guys have said no.
    Someone involved with the 36er tire development shoudl call Josh at Unicycle.Com

    I spoke to Josh last week and he told me that he has not received any calls concerning this tire.

    In terms of understanding user value in the development of this tire, the 36" wheel means much more to unicyclists than bicyclists because we really don't have gears, therefore if we want to go fast we have to ride a bigger wheel. As many of you know, the current tires choices are poor, both in weight and usability for off road riding.

    Call Josh at UDC, tell him what you are doing, ask him about developing a lighter rim.

  16. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Someone involved with the 36er tire development shoudl call Josh at Unicycle.Com

    I spoke to Josh last week and he told me that he has not received any calls concerning this tire.

    In terms of understanding user value in the development of this tire, the 36" wheel means much more to unicyclists than bicyclists because we really don't have gears, therefore if we want to go fast we have to ride a bigger wheel. As many of you know, the current tires choices are poor, both in weight and usability for off road riding.

    Call Josh at UDC, tell him what you are doing, ask him about developing a lighter rim.
    I've spoken with Roger in the UK numerous times and we have posted back and forth onthe unicyclist forums. I thought the UK office was HQ. Is that not correct?

    From what I gathered, they weren't exactly thrilled (from the business side) with the new tire being developed as Nimbus is their house brand and hence they have significant resources sunk into that tire, and likely a pretty decent inventory. I don't blame them at all, but perhaps I got it wrong. I'd have rather they developed the new tire from the start but that discussion didn't go anywhere.

    Regardless, I'm confused on why it would take someone to develop a new tire for them to want a better rim? A lighter rim can't handle a 4lb tire? Just because? What am I missing here?

    Willing to take the discussion off-line also if there's info that shouldn't be posted publicly. I can't recall if I have your emial, so shoot me a PM if you want.

    While we're on it, Velocity got back to me with a "might be able to produce a few" with no firm timeline so still working through that with them and what a few really means. Again, I'd rather have them be the retailer and just be able to buy something better than the current. I think their P35 would be a good one to "size up".

  17. #142
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    I've spoken with Roger in the UK numerous times and we have posted back and forth onthe unicyclist forums. I thought the UK office was HQ. Is that not correct?
    I'll send you a pm.

  18. #143
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    All I can say on this tire so far : Hubba!

    On rims, if not well researched and massaged yet, contact Salsa and Velocity. Both have non-heavy 35mm rims that seem to have more than decent reputations.
    Wheel builder: would more spokes (than the typical 36) help in strength on top of stiffness for 36"? For a hub maker, it's only about willingness to drill the flanges for 40-48 spokes. Flanges ought to hold up, many low spoke count narrow flange spacing hubs out there.
    Have spokes been addressed by someone, to make 40-48 spokes viable?

  19. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloxxki View Post
    All I can say on this tire so far : Hubba!

    On rims, if not well researched and massaged yet, contact Salsa and Velocity. Both have non-heavy 35mm rims that seem to have more than decent reputations.
    Wheel builder: would more spokes (than the typical 36) help in strength on top of stiffness for 36"? For a hub maker, it's only about willingness to drill the flanges for 40-48 spokes. Flanges ought to hold up, many low spoke count narrow flange spacing hubs out there.
    Have spokes been addressed by someone, to make 40-48 spokes viable?
    You can get a Nimbus in 48 spoke count from UDC, but may have to get it from an overseas section of their site (or ask the USA office nicely). Mate it to a 48h hub and your good to go.

    I believe David was planning to do this on his custom build?

  20. #145
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    Very few 48 holes hubs available.
    My builder did a 185mm DO to DO for the front
    He's now on the rear one, 170mm dishless to stick to the new "fatbike" standard.
    DirtySixer36er, Ventana ElCapitan, Soma Smoothie 66cm, Trek T100, ChoiceCollective36er.
    DirtySixer
    36er

  21. #146
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    Forty eight spokes in a 36er length is gonna make for a heavy wheel. I have not had any issues that I can say were caused by insufficient spoke count or lack of spoke strength. It's a big wheel, I think they stand up fine as long as you treat it for what it is, but you start getting big air and land sideways, it'll be a long walk home...

    As to wider hubs, that is an idea that has merit, which is why my new 36er build is using a 125 mm hub with 100 spacing between the flanges; it's only 80mm on a standard 100mm hub. I could get even more flange spacing, but it's a disc hub, so I'm paying a little penalty.

    I love tires, just got a new one tonight for my 29er, $81 delivered for a Hans Dampf 2.35 Pacestar, it replaces a tried and trusted Ardent 2.4, looking for more sidewall strength a bit more stick.

  22. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Forty eight spokes in a 36er length is gonna make for a heavy wheel. I have not had any issues that I can say were caused by insufficient spoke count or lack of spoke strength. It's a big wheel, I think they stand up fine as long as you treat it for what it is, but you start getting big air and land sideways, it'll be a long walk home...

    As to wider hubs, that is an idea that has merit, which is why my new 36er build is using a 125 mm hub with 100 spacing between the flanges; it's only 80mm on a standard 100mm hub. I could get even more flange spacing, but it's a disc hub, so I'm paying a little penalty.

    I love tires, just got a new one tonight for my 29er, $81 delivered for a Hans Dampf 2.35 Pacestar, it replaces a tried and trusted Ardent 2.4, looking for more sidewall strength a bit more stick.
    Ben:
    Which hub? I'm running the Paul whub disk. 135mm spacing, not sure what the flange is. I center drilled the end caps for a 10x135 mm dt swiss axle. that REALLY stiffened the front end up. I'd love a 15mm or a 20mm axle, but felt the wider hub was more beneficial than the larger axle. (I'd love to hear other opinions)

    What did you find for the rear? I have a DTswiss 440 with 150mmx12, but will likely go to a 142mm next time to reduce the need for the 83mm BB.

    I'm with you. With current spokes, a 48 spoke wheel would be at least 1/2lb heavier for the pair; if not a full lb. It's already a pig without the extra weight penalty. Probably even more weight.

    I don't see a need for anything other than a stiffer rim. If someone wants big air, they should be on a different bike.

  23. #148
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    Sorry, it's a unicycle hub

    As to hub widths, a wider hub does make the wheel stronger and it's not like a wider hub will reduce clearance or cause "boot out" as occurs in skiing/boarding.

    Narrow hubs are vestiges of road biking, so it might be time for a change for MTB's considering the recent evolution of fat tired bikes and bigger wheels like the 36er...

  24. #149
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    The weight penalty for 48h would only be there when sticking to 14G spokes. I was wondering whether butted spokes have been pursued.
    The trick would be to get an undrilled hub shell. Drilling spoke holes is a precise job (get distances and radii right), but not exactly rocket science. Really, a hub maker could easily (if willing) change their CNC program. But yeah, finding someone in bikes to do the right thing is about the hardest thing on earth.
    I once had a crazy light 36h 26" wheel. 24 right, 12 left. Spokes on the left were really light, the right were lighter than I was previously aware existed. Worked like a charm, better than all 32h weightweenie wheels I've had before and after. Just to say there's more options then what's been done until now.
    I'd only want 48h with wide hubs and light spokes, alse it makes little sense.
    Klok - XC - Skate - Ski

  25. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    Sorry, it's a unicycle hub

    As to hub widths, a wider hub does make the wheel stronger and it's not like a wider hub will reduce clearance or cause "boot out" as occurs in skiing/boarding.

    Narrow hubs are vestiges of road biking, so it might be time for a change for MTB's considering the recent evolution of fat tired bikes and bigger wheels like the 36er...
    Oh.. I'm also in the market for a freehub with a direct drive. (not for a unicycle)

    I'd love to have a wider hub, it will make the triangle formed between the rim/hub stronger.

    I suppose it wouldn't be 'too' hard to have them made. If I used something like DTSwiss internals, I'd be able to avoid all the small parts that would rack up the costs. I could use something like a 12x135 axle. I'll have to explore this...

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