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  1. #1
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    Jumpers, is 650b too big?

    Do wheels larger than 26 inch become too awkward to do larger jumps, wheelie drops, table tops, ramped launches, stunts?

    I'm not a big jumper, but I like to launch off trail side smaller jumps to 3 foot or a familiar 4 foot vertical drop to landing, up to about 12 - 15 feet in length, going about 15 to 25mph. I've found 650b lands smoother and makes the same jumps feel "smaller" than when I rode them with 26 inch wheels on the same bike.

    How do more talented or fearless riders than me like jumping with larger wheels?

  2. #2
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    I wouldn't call what you are talking about jumping as to me a jump denotes a lip and landing with downside.
    650b stuff is fine in that application, but the more time I expect to spend in the air, the smaller my wheels get. If you want to jump everything on a trail, ride 26" wheels, higher angle of attack means more potential lips.

    The nicest thing about 650b wheels for more agressive applications is the ability you have to scrub and "squash" lips with them. They are far more nimble than 29" wheels, but have a larger enough contact patch to be able to effectively pre-carve lips for lower trajectories and whatnot.
    The bigger the wheel, the better it is for NOT getting air, and conversely, as long as the lateral strength is still there, the more forgiving and stable it is to land on.

    All wheelsizes have their merits, and if something is fun do it. That's my pop-psych of the week.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuspectDevice
    The bigger the wheel, the better it is for NOT getting air.

    All wheelsizes have their merits, and if something is fun do it. That's my pop-psych of the week.

    these two lines right here sum it all up perfectly.

  4. #4
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    Look at what the BMXers discovered long ago- larger wheels tend to absorb small ramps into mere bumps.
    Ever been to Mountain Bike Tales Digital Magazine? Now if only the print rags would catch on!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimTwisted
    Look at what the BMXers discovered long ago- larger wheels tend to absorb small ramps into mere bumps.
    Thanks guys. I guess that's why my familiar jumps feel "smaller" now.

    For racing larger wheels would be a good thing to be able to keep accelerating longer or braking, so long as there was not a weight penalty.

    And better for drop offs.

    But for ramped stunts, gaps, launched air time, not good.

  6. #6
    Reviewer/Tester
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    My thoughts, exactly...

    R.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hand/of/Midas
    these two lines right here sum it all up perfectly.
    It is inevitable ...

  7. #7
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    Jumping in late...(ha!)

    While I agree that my 650B bike makes my jumps feel smaller. One exception to the bigger is better for NOT getting air has to be the 69'er I rode. 2009 El Chucho 69'er Review The big wheel up front, the slightly slack geo and the smaller wheel out back made for one of the most stable bikes in the air I've ever ridden and it was easy to wheelie and lauch that thing. Fun, fun, fun times on that bike!

    -A
    -Aaron G.

    "Before D.W., "anti-squat" was referred to as pedal feedback."

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