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  1. #1
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    1998 Stumpjumper Frame

    I picked up a decent framset at a sale recently but it has no fork. The frame is really light. I am thinking i want to use a rigid fork. Does anyone know of a rigid inch and 1/8 fork that would work with this? I assume it has to have a suspension offset to allow the geometry to be correct. Id like to build it up as a nice all-arounder.....and id like it to be rigid.

  2. #2
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    I think they came with an 80mm travel fork? A Surly Instigator fork might be close enough, it is supposed to replace a 100mm travel fork. Definitely check Surly though, they have tons of options

  3. #3
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    I have an M2 stumpjumper with a 80mm rockshox recon suspension fork and the axle to crown is 467mm, which is about right to keep the geometry the bike was designed for. So be sure to get a rigid fork with a similar a to c and you should be good to go.

  4. #4
    Just A Mountain Biker.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scale View Post
    I picked up a decent framset at a sale recently but it has no fork. The frame is really light. I am thinking i want to use a rigid fork. Does anyone know of a rigid inch and 1/8 fork that would work with this? I assume it has to have a suspension offset to allow the geometry to be correct. Id like to build it up as a nice all-arounder.....and id like it to be rigid.
    I have a Specialized rigid fork of that year in my garage, drop me a PM if interested.


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  5. #5
    Hardtail Steel Forever
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    These are a pretty harsh riding bike, I would personally look for an older 80mm fork. Otherwise for rigid, look for something in the 430mm range.
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  6. #6
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    Those things rode WAYYYY better with a 100mm fork IME - had a few from that era.
    Suspension seatpost didn't hurt either - stiff as hell,at least until the CS cracks.
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  7. #7
    Hardtail Steel Forever
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Those things rode WAYYYY better with a 100mm fork IME - had a few from that era.
    Suspension seatpost didn't hurt either - stiff as hell,at least until the CS cracks.
    You don't think the extra height messes up the snappy steering?

    At least on my other mid-90's hardtails, it just kills the feel to get above about 450mm on the front end.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jestep View Post
    You don't think the extra height messes up the snappy steering?

    At least on my other mid-90's hardtails, it just kills the feel to get above about 450mm on the front end.
    "Messes up" or "improves upon"?

    I always found that a little slacker HTA and a little more travel was a good thing when it came to the dealing with those overly steep old-school geos.
    Judging by the changes that have come around since then, it seems the majority of rest of the MTB world is on board now too. An extra inch of travel and a degree slacker up front, along with some 'oversized' 2.3" tires and riser bars made those bikes much more friendly for trail riding IME.
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  9. #9
    Just A Mountain Biker.
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    "Messes up" or "improves upon"?

    I always found that a little slacker HTA and a little more travel was a good thing when it came to the dealing with those overly steep old-school geos.
    Judging by the changes that have come around since then, it seems the majority of rest of the MTB world is on board now too. An extra inch of travel and a degree slacker up front, along with some 'oversized' 2.3" tires and riser bars made those bikes much more friendly for trail riding IME.
    Or keep it rigid, with a couple nice 2.35 tires and enjoy it as intended.


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