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  1. #1
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    Wet Noodle! What Happened?

    I ride an 07 Yeti 575. Ive had it for years, and I love it.

    Yesterday on a long fast fireroad downhill, I took a corner and the rear end felt like a wet noodle. It was all over the place. Fearing the worst, I took it easy for the rest of the ride.

    I pulled the rear wheel off and the axle is good, no broken spokes, tire had plenty of air.

    The only thing that has changed since my last ride is that I swapped on an old IRC Mythos 2.1 tire because the tire that was on it was totally worn out. Was I just feeling this Mythos tire roll over? Are there points on these old Yetis that break when they get this old?

    I would like to figure out my options before buying new tires. The bike needs a chain and cassette too, so if I broke it, nows the time to figure it out.

  2. #2
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    Did you check your spoke tension? Had the same issue last year, and it's amazing how 1-2 spokes can make a huge difference.

  3. #3
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    Up until you put an old IRC Mythos tire on, it rode fine. It's about a 2" tire to begin with and worn. I'm guessing it's the tire.

  4. #4
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    How did it pedal and shift? If the frame fails to the point of wet noodle, there would be drive train problems.

    My best guess is that when you did the tire swap and reinstalled the wheel it didn't seat correctly in the drop outs or the cam on the quick release was wrong or something like that. Grabbing a handful of brake on a big downhill could unseat the axle in that case.

    In any case you should clean and inspect everything thoroughly and snug down the pivots.

  5. #5
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    tire roll ain't gotta be much to make you think it's chooched
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  6. #6
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    Yeah, take a good look at the chainstays.
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  7. #7
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    A quick search here points to the chain stay weld at the drop out on the non-drive side problematic.

  8. #8
    Class Clown
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    the fact this happened when you switched tires would point me to that being the likely culprit, but it's hard to say over the web

  9. #9
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    Here is an update:

    I pulled the rear triangle off today, and it seems fine. The main pivot bearing are completely locked up, and 2 of the 4 linkage bearing are grumbly. Also, the lower bushing on the shock is worn and wobbly. New bearings and bushing are on the way. I also got a brand new Nobby Nic 2.35 that was on sale at Jenson coming.

    The derailleur hanger was loose too...

    Hopefully all this will fix the situation....

  10. #10
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    I would double check the rear triangle. Years ago I had a similar situation (not a Yeti) where the bike felt weird and the rear was sloppy. I thought it was the wheel or the pivots or the tire. Checked the frame and all good but the problem didn't go away. Checked again and there was a tiny hairline crack on the chainstay weld almost invisible.

    I could only see it if I put force on the tire - it would spread slightly.

  11. #11
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    Not a bad idea. I will give it another look when I put it back together.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by blown240 View Post
    Here is an update:

    I pulled the rear triangle off today, and it seems fine. The main pivot bearing are completely locked up, and 2 of the 4 linkage bearing are grumbly. Also, the lower bushing on the shock is worn and wobbly. New bearings and bushing are on the way. I also got a brand new Nobby Nic 2.35 that was on sale at Jenson coming.

    The derailleur hanger was loose too...

    Hopefully all this will fix the situation....
    All the above would happen over time, not suddenly from one ride to the next. I would re-check for cracks. They can be very hard to see without someone to help by flexing bike while the other inspects.
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  13. #13
    Mudhorse
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    There's an effective way of checking for bike flex, but it has to be done carefully or the bike could get seriously damaged. Stand facing one side of the bike and put one hand on the saddle, the other hand on the stem. Lean the bike away from you and with a foot carefully apply a bit of pressure to the bottom bracket. Don't press too hard, mind - bikes aren't designed for large forces acting in this direction and there's enough strength in your leg to break the frame or taco a wheel. Sturge's suggestion of having a helper check for cracks is a good 'un, and if any are present they'll make themselves known (the crack assistant should be looking on the other side of the bike to the BB pusher as cracks on this side will open up. Turn the bike around and repeat the procedure to check both sides).

    If you've got access to a number of different bikes it's quite interesting to compare the differences, even if it's not a carefully calibrated foot and the comparisons are subjective. The difference between a QR rear axle and a 12 mm thru-axle is noticeable; similarly between horst link and single pivot architectures, CF and alloy frames etc.

    It's also a very good way to get thrown out of your local bike shop.
    Hose me down till the water runs clear.

  14. #14
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    Thats an interesting experiment....

    I have a 94 Stumpjumper FSR (original design) an old Intense M1, and my Yeti 575 here. I may have to do some comparisons.....

  15. #15
    Mudhorse
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    ^ Do post the results, blown240, I'd be curious to know what you find. I've done it on the three full squish bikes I've owned and I'm happy to report that my bikes have been getting stiffer over the years.

    First bike was a 2001 Marin Attack Trail, which had a lightweight monocoque aluminium frame and a single pivot. That was as flexy as hell, though one of those horseshoe V-brake bracket things did stiffen up the back end a bit until the welds started cracking.

    Second bike was a 2004 Attack Trail, a warranty replacement frame for the first one. That had a heavier monocoque Al frame and a dual pivot, and though stiffer than the first it was still flexy. I've managed to stiffen that up with a clamp near the lower shock attachment (there's a slot to adjust the travel and as I've always got it set to 6" I put a bolt and spacer sleeve in the 4" position) and by replacing the rear QR axle with a 10 mm thru axle. Shame it doesn't have V-brake bosses as a horseshoe would have helped too.

    Third bike is a 2017 Ghost Riot 8, with a lightweight carbon fibre frame with a modified horst link architecture and 12 mm rear axle. It's as stiff as hell.
    Hose me down till the water runs clear.

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