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  1. #1
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    Upgrade or replace

    Hello everyone, it's my first post but I've been lurking on this forum for quite some time.

    Anyway, I have an old Marin Rock Springs (1999) which was given to me by a friend together with a second set of wheels and tyres, some time ago and it forced me to come back to mtb - which I enjoy despite not having huge amount of experience.

    So far I've upgraded the rear shock (Manitou McLeod 190x50) since the old (original) one was shot, the front suspension is also in good condition for it's age and so it the complete frame - no cracks (I weigh just a little over 60kg so the frame would not be stressed ), only a few bruises here and there.

    However now I cannot decide which way to go, should I start replacing other worn out components or replace the bike (front derailleur is quite badly worn on it's hinges, seat and seat post are in quite poor condition, chain is ok for now but it will need replacement, front crankset is worn but ok for now) and the main thing is the brakes.
    It still has V-brakes, while I have no problems using those, disc brakes would be better.
    I understand that a new bike will probably have better geometry, better materials etc. but I also do like this bike and would like to put it back into good shape and I realize that any new component that I put on this bike won't be much of use if I buy a new one 1-2 years from now.

  2. #2
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    If I were you I would do just enough to keep it running while I save for another bike. Keep in mind that you do not have to buy new as there are bargains to be found on the used market.

  3. #3
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    Its hard to give advice to someone asking about a bike that's 2 decades old. The bike is hopelessly outdated, but if it was a quality bike back then in some ways it's better than a modern cheapo bike. Don't dump a heap of money in to it. Figure a good modern FS bike from the internet is ~2500$. Figure a good experience is having gear that matches your riding buddy's.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  4. #4
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    Thank you both for your input, I forgot to mention in my first post that money isn't an issue, right now i could afford any bike I wanted but I could not justify the costs of some bikes neither do I have the experience level to use such bikes to it's fullest potential.

    So that is why I cannot decide which way to go.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToniT View Post
    Thank you both for your input, I forgot to mention in my first post that money isn't an issue, right now i could afford any bike I wanted but I could not justify the costs of some bikes neither do I have the experience level to use such bikes to it's fullest potential.

    So that is why I cannot decide which way to go.
    What do you want out of your mtb experience? IMO the banshee rune/spitfire on jensenusa are a sweet package- good enough you won't outgrow them, and cheap enough that you won't lose your shirt if you sell in a year. But it's hard to offer advice to someone who isn't really in the sport; your priorities are your own. I've hand-held enough newbies to know it's mostly a waste of time and they're gonna fixate on whatever ridiculous metric they're drawn to.

    A bike is its geometry. 10mm of wheelbase is an obvious change, and its grown 6" since your bike was made.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    A bike is its geometry. 10mm of wheelbase is an obvious change, and its grown 6" since your bike was made.
    This is a mixed blessing if your trails have lots of tight switchbacks.

    Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    What do you want out of your mtb experience? IMO the banshee rune/spitfire on jensenusa are a sweet package- good enough you won't outgrow them, and cheap enough that you won't lose your shirt if you sell in a year. But it's hard to offer advice to someone who isn't really in the sport; your priorities are your own. I've hand-held enough newbies to know it's mostly a waste of time and they're gonna fixate on whatever ridiculous metric they're drawn to.

    A bike is its geometry. 10mm of wheelbase is an obvious change, and its grown 6" since your bike was made.
    I love the climbs as well as downhill riding, so prefer something with good climbing abilities, but the most important thing I always wanted from mtb is good workout and have good fun - so the fancy carbon frames do nothing for me. The local terrain here is mostly dirt with some rocks, and lots of tree roots.
    I forgot to mention I'm in Europe so the prices are a bit different than in the US,

  8. #8
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    I would get the bike to working order then ride and enjoy. See how you go then decide if you want to buy new machine. As the choice is big now. With 26, 27.5 of 29er etc Money could be wasted if you get it wrong.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToniT View Post
    I love the climbs as well as downhill riding, so prefer something with good climbing abilities, but the most important thing I always wanted from mtb is good workout and have good fun - so the fancy carbon frames do nothing for me. The local terrain here is mostly dirt with some rocks, and lots of tree roots.
    I forgot to mention I'm in Europe so the prices are a bit different than in the US,
    This is a bit of a thread jack, but since you are in Europe I'm curious as to what the popular wheel size is there? Are they following the same trends the US is or do you still see alot of 26" bikes?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by wightweenie26er View Post
    I would get the bike to working order then ride and enjoy. See how you go then decide if you want to buy new machine. As the choice is big now. With 26, 27.5 of 29er etc Money could be wasted if you get it wrong.
    I decided to do just that for the moment - the bike as it is now is in fully working condition but it needs a few new components, more for safety reasons than anything else.

    Quote Originally Posted by JPL65 View Post
    This is a bit of a thread jack, but since you are in Europe I'm curious as to what the popular wheel size is there? Are they following the same trends the US is or do you still see alot of 26" bikes?
    I would say 27.5 but 29 is moving in.
    I haven't seen a new 26'' for quite some time - I do see people riding them but even that is becoming rare.

  11. #11
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    I just rebuilt my 26er (2003 Giant NRS) just because I still love the bike. Now I do have a new 29er (Cannondale Scalpel carbon) and the difference between them is night and day. The only problem I had, as with anything older was trying to find parts for the 26 but I still managed to find NOS parts out there online. Jensonusa.com had a lot of what I needed.

  12. #12
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    you could also get a new bike and use your current bike for a commuter/ pub/ urban bike.... i have a 97 specialized rockhopper I picked up at a yard sale for $5 and rebuilt it into a single speed townie
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Upgrade or replace-35362838_10155348321965303_2801870302647156736_n.jpg  

    Upgrade or replace-blazer-084.jpg  

    97 specialized rockhopper.- urban beater
    2013 GT aggressor 3.0- urban assault vehicle

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockhopper97 View Post
    you could also get a new bike and use your current bike for a commuter/ pub/ urban bike.... i have a 97 specialized rockhopper I picked up at a yard sale for $5 and rebuilt it into a single speed townie
    Sadly, due to my distance to work and the type of work I do I couldn't use it as a commuter.

    But anyway, I serviced the bike a little, upgraded the V-brakes to Shimano SLX disc brakes, replaced the seat and will probably replace the pedals as well.
    Already did quite a few rides with it and enjoyed it every second.

  14. #14
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    Your going to spend close to this amount on good parts to rebuild your current bike. https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2212641/ I would browse pinkbike for something much more modern. If your content on rebuilding pinkbike would be a good place to get parts.

  15. #15
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    You say money is no issue, but I'm sure you're very interested in value. In that regard, I wouldn't put a single euro into that bike. Decide exactly what you want out of a bike, decide what bike would work best for that application and get it.

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