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  1. #1
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    Trek Fuel 90 SLR

    hey guys,
    I'm new on this forum and new to mountain biking. i just recently purchased a Trek Fuel 90 SLR as a beginner bike. Is anyone on here familiar with these bikes? if so what can you tell me about it? Are they any good? what should i upgrade or what should i do in order to get this bike up to par.

    thank you all, I'm looking forward to learning anything i can.



    Trek Fuel 90 SLR-img_0023.jpgName:  IMG_0024.JPG
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Size:  48.4 KBTrek Fuel 90 SLR-img_0026.jpgTrek Fuel 90 SLR-img_0029.jpgTrek Fuel 90 SLR-img_0028.jpg

  2. #2
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    Similar to buying an OLD Jeep. Sure it'll still make it down the trail but it's gonna be pretty unrefined and rattley, and not worth using long term unless you're into that sort of thing.

    Check the chain, brake pads, suspension damping, and sidewalls of the rims. If nothing is worn out just adjust the seat height (if you need it where it is that bike is way to big for you) and go ride. At most consider new touch points (seat, grips, and especially pedals).

    Like that old Jeep there is nothing wrong with using an old bike, it's just that the rest of the world has moved on. Equipment has improved and to some extent the trails have changed to match the capabilities of new equipment.

  3. #3
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    Looks pretty good to me. Tune it up, make sure it's shifting right.

    I'd prefer a bike like this -- if everything is working -- over a typical low-end new bike, but that's just me. Some early (90's) full suspension bikes were pretty bad. But this one is more of an 00's design and IMO they had things figured out quite a bit by this point...

    Fork and shock may be worn out or in dire need of service.

    New pedals are a good idea, check out Fooker pedals...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    Similar to buying an OLD Jeep. Sure it'll still make it down the trail but it's gonna be pretty unrefined and rattley, and not worth using long term unless you're into that sort of thing.

    Check the chain, brake pads, suspension damping, and sidewalls of the rims. If nothing is worn out just adjust the seat height (if you need it where it is that bike is way to big for you) and go ride. At most consider new touch points (seat, grips, and especially pedals).

    Like that old Jeep there is nothing wrong with using an old bike, it's just that the rest of the world has moved on. Equipment has improved and to some extent the trails have changed to match the capabilities of new equipment.
    thanks for the feed back. Yeah I'm going to get it tuned up and just see how far it gets me.

    Quote Originally Posted by phantoj View Post
    Looks pretty good to me. Tune it up, make sure it's shifting right.

    I'd prefer a bike like this -- if everything is working -- over a typical low-end new bike, but that's just me. Some early (90's) full suspension bikes were pretty bad. But this one is more of an 00's design and IMO they had things figured out quite a bit by this point...

    Fork and shock may be worn out or in dire need of service.

    New pedals are a good idea, check out Fooker pedals...
    thanks for the info.yeah when i was looking at bikes i didn't want to spend to much on a bike if I'm new to this. and i didn't wanna spend a lot on getting a new bike but something out of walmart. so i was like let me get a reliable brand for cheap and tune it up and hope for the best.

  5. #5
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    If that's a manitou SX fork, you might want to search around online for an elastomer kit. You might need a fork if the elastomer is beat down. You don't want to spend a lot on that bike, but you might find a good deal on fleabay for one of the nicer Suntour forks.

  6. #6
    aka "SirLurkAlot"
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_papa_nuts View Post
    Similar to buying an OLD Jeep. Sure it'll still make it down the trail but it's gonna be pretty unrefined and rattley, and not worth using long term unless you're into that sort of thing.

    Check the chain, brake pads, suspension damping, and sidewalls of the rims. If nothing is worn out just adjust the seat height (if you need it where it is that bike is way to big for you) and go ride. At most consider new touch points (seat, grips, and especially pedals).

    Like that old Jeep there is nothing wrong with using an old bike, it's just that the rest of the world has moved on. Equipment has improved and to some extent the trails have changed to match the capabilities of new equipment.

    No disrespect but I don't necessarily agree. It really depends on your local trails. I bought one of these new and rode the heck out of it until I discovered single speeds. Most of the bikes on my local trails are WAY overbuilt pigs. They're capable of dropping off near cliffs but the trails don't have anything remotely close to what would necessitate them.

    I ride new and old tech on my local trails with zero problems here in NC. Give it a go, build up your skills and fitness and decide for yourself. Unless you're hitting the bike park, you're likely just fine.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by hsakkire View Post
    No disrespect but I don't necessarily agree. It really depends on your local trails. I bought one of these new and rode the heck out of it until I discovered single speeds. Most of the bikes on my local trails are WAY overbuilt pigs. They're capable of dropping off near cliffs but the trails don't have anything remotely close to what would necessitate them.

    I ride new and old tech on my local trails with zero problems here in NC. Give it a go, build up your skills and fitness and decide for yourself. Unless you're hitting the bike park, you're likely just fine.
    I guess I could have elaborated, but wanted to keep my post pretty concise. I get where your coming from. I ride a 25 year old bike on the trails here in Michigan and it's fine, though I do like my modern hardtail better. And in central Texas I rode trails I thought my 140mm bike was at it's limits, and people would tell me they used to ride the same trails on rigid 26" hardtails with canti brakes.

    There is nothing wrong with old tech, but things change for a reason.

    If someone gave me that bike IDK if I'd ride it, if it was the only bike I had I'd ride it till I could get something better.

  8. #8
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    You could do a lot worse than an old fuel. We've had a few of those, and liked them. You will need a shock pump for the rear shock. Those old foxes are pretty easy to fix if they leak air.

    Your biggest problem is likely to be the fork. They are a pain to work on and expensive to replace. Hopefully yours is functional. If you decide to replace the fork, do your research, there are many different fork out there which will not work on that bike for a variety of reasons.

    You should learn how to fix your bike yourself. And old bike needs care and bringing it to the shop for each little thing will add up fast. The basics are pretty simple to learn.

  9. #9
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    One more thing. Although it is a nice bike, I really do like those old fuels, do not invest significant money into it. Its not cost effective to do so.

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