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  1. #1
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    Revamping older bike

    I received this from my brother in law years ago. I have used it in the past but not in a while. My father in law is getting me into trail riding in our area.

    Not wanting to go purchase a new bike, but I know there has been a lot of advancement since 2005.

    What would you guys reccomend to make this bike more user friendly and easier to ride the trails with.

    I was riding one of his salsas that had some really low gears that made it really easy to go up step hills. It also had much wider tires on it.

    I appreciate the help!




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    Last edited by kenny256; 2 Weeks Ago at 12:18 PM. Reason: Picture added

  2. #2
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    start with an overhaul and a complete tune up......you would be amazed what a simple bearing repack, new cables and things like a new saddle grips and pedals could do for an older bike....I would swap out those pedals for some race face chesters
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockhopper97 View Post
    start with an overhaul and a complete tune up......you would be amazed what a simple bearing repack, new cables and things like a new saddle grips and pedals could do for an older bike....I would swap out those pedals for some race face chesters
    Will do! I'll check those peddles out.

    I really want to investigate the gears that were on the salsa I was riding, I'm also wanting to go with tubeless tires and wheels, is it just easy as buying them and swapping them out?

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  4. #4
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    I'm guessing you have an 8 speed cassette, you can get I believe an 11-32 rear cassette and that combined with you triple crankset and 26" wheels should be able to scale vertical walls.

  5. #5
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    Some quality tyres will make a huge difference in handling. Depending what trails you ride as to what tyres you get but I generally find Maxxis donít make any bad tyres. Something like a high roller 2 is a fairly good alrounder. Or for more ďxcĒ trails, maybe an ardent or ikon in the rear. I donít want to start a whole tyre debate so just go to your local shop and ask their recommendation for your trails. Get a 2.35 (or wider) if you can fit in your frame and fork. And make sure you donít pump them up too hard. Depending on your weight, somewhere between 20 and 30 psi should be ok. Maybe high 20s for the rear and low 20s for the front.
    The gears youíre running should be fine. Looks like a triple chainset so you will have very low gears. Use the granny ring for up hills and you should be able to climb anything with ease.

  6. #6
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    Does the fork still work?

    Tubeless is going to be tough. You can convert the existing rims to tubeless but they're obviously not tubeless ready, so sometimes results will be mixed. Finding 26in rim brake compatible tubeless wheels is not cheap at all.
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  7. #7
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    It would help to know what your application is in order to know what would be an improvement in build.
    If you're riding flat terrain, rail trails, etc., I'd say tune it up and ride it as is. If you're riding demanding terrain, I'd say give it a really thorough tune while you save up for a more capable bike.
    I wouldn't go tubeless on that bike and the limitations of frame width and fork width will make going significantly bigger on tires an unlikely endeavor.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    It would help to know what your application is in order to know what would be an improvement in build.
    If you're riding flat terrain, rail trails, etc., I'd say tune it up and ride it as is. If you're riding demanding terrain, I'd say give it a really thorough tune while you save up for a more capable bike.
    I wouldn't go tubeless on that bike.
    Trail riding, hills all over the place that are pretty much rocks and roots.

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by kenny256 View Post
    Trail riding, hills all over the place that are pretty much rocks and roots.

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    Where do you live? How much riding have you done or will you do? Age? Fitness? Any trail names that would give us info? Do you know what your starting and ending elevations are? How long ago did you ride? What kind of riding was it? How long did you ride during that period? Any info would help.


    I could describe my riding as "Trail riding, hills all over the place that are pretty much rocks and roots."

    Does that give you any idea of what bike I should be on?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Where do you live? How much riding have you done or will you do? Age? Fitness? Any trail names that would give us info? Do you know what your starting and ending elevations are? How long ago did you ride? What kind of riding was it? How long did you ride during that period? Any info would help.
    SW mo area, new to riding have in the past but awhile ago. I'm 30 years old. In reasonable shape but cardio is rough! Sack osage trail by springfield is where we were riding and some trails by Stockton lake.

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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pembo6 View Post
    Some quality tyres will make a huge difference in handling. Depending what trails you ride as to what tyres you get but I generally find Maxxis donít make any bad tyres. Something like a high roller 2 is a fairly good alrounder. Or for more ďxcĒ trails, maybe an ardent or ikon in the rear. I donít want to start a whole tyre debate so just go to your local shop and ask their recommendation for your trails. Get a 2.35 (or wider) if you can fit in your frame and fork. And make sure you donít pump them up too hard. Depending on your weight, somewhere between 20 and 30 psi should be ok. Maybe high 20s for the rear and low 20s for the front.
    The gears youíre running should be fine. Looks like a triple chainset so you will have very low gears. Use the granny ring for up hills and you should be able to climb anything with ease.
    The maxxis tires are what he had on both his bikes and they seemed to do a great job. I'll probably just check those out then.

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  12. #12
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    I hear there are some pretty nice trails down there and especially across the border into Arkansas.

    The weak point, IMO, on that bike is the fork -- a very basic model with no damping.

    But upgrading a fork is not a very cheap and easy upgrade. So I agree with the "ride what you have" advice. Repair things that break, and save up for a newer/better bike.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantoj View Post
    The weak point, IMO, on that bike is the fork -- a very basic model with no damping.
    At the moment, yeah, but the weak point is the bike. Change one part and another one will become the weakest link.


    That said, it's totally serviceable if it works well. It was a pretty rad entry-level bike in 2005. Get your tire pressures dialed, figure out how you like to set up the cockpit, get the brakes so they feel strong and engage 'just so...' Then ride the crap out of it and be aware you're not gonna be the fastest dude. Which is OK. It will climb as well as anything modern, and can be jumped quite well if you have the technique, and will never be as fun or fast on descents as a modern bike.

    If you're having fun, consider getting something more modern. It might be another hardtail.


    edit- those pedals SUCK. Check out the aforementioned chesters.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  14. #14
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    fix it up enough to be a decent bike but don't sink any real money into it.

  15. #15
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    If you want to save money, Fooker pedals are a knockoff of the Chesters and they are pretty good: https://www.amazon.com/FOOKER-Compos...ct_top?ie=UTF8

    I got a set for my son (they were branded as Eagle Riding but seem like the same thing).

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