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  1. #1
    rode a bicycle once...
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    replacement crankset for oldass Trek

    Hey all, 'new' user on the forums here from Wyoming. Technically not new its just been a long while since i've been on the boards so I forgot all my old info. At one point I believe I posted a super budget KHS 'build' (for lack of a better term) on here.

    Anyway, Its been a few years since I've really been back in to biking... my last few rides were a Trek 1.1 road, a Javelin Narni tri bike, and an old 98 GT LTS-1 XC with bombers on it. I've since sold all those off, and have been given an old 95 Trek 830 Mountain Trak.

    I have had some more expensive DH and XC bikes in the past but grew up (early 90's) riding all rigid. The bike that I have currently is the full frame cromoly which happens to be my favorite frame material. I'm tired of rebuilding shocks, pivots, and all that crap, so as I get back into single track am planning on just rigid. I also don't fancy 29ers at all, so 26 is just fine with me.

    Other than a set of mid-fat Bontrager XR-4 tires, a set of Mavic XC rims (stolen from the LTS-1), and Jagwires, its stock. Bottom bracket and crankset are completely shot. Question is... this is a daily ridden bike all over the place, I've done some hearty riding in my lifetime so am not easy on it. The trails out in Wyo aren't the smoothest or most polite. These days... what would be a good sealed crankset....single front ring for a 9 speed rear [**EDIT!!** 8 SPEED REAR], that will take a daily beating and not break down? I don't want to pay 500 something dollars so was checking out the Shimano Deore LX setup. I've done some research and they seem to hold up I was just wondering if there's personal experience?

    Also I know most people dont prefer the older bike rebuild vs just buying a new one... but as stated I really like cromoly frames....not a fan of aluminum.... and don't need the bells and whistles. Less moving parts = less issues for me.
    Last edited by wyomad; 04-29-2018 at 11:33 AM.

  2. #2
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    My inclination would be to put a new BB on it and replace the chainrings rather than the crankset. I'm guessing it's a square taper BB? They're under $20.
    That would probably be the cheapest solution.
    Other than just living with it and putting in $0, which is definitely an option!

  3. #3
    rode a bicycle once...
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    Yeah I agree that's most likely the best option. I wish I could put in a total of 0 dollars however the BB is basically seized up. I can technically pedal it but it takes a ton of work...not much fun. I plan on purchasing a newer rigid in the future when I get some money together so would like to get this one going for awhile. I know its an older bike but there's something about staring at a bike hanging on the wall with life still left in it...its hard not to want to ride em.

  4. #4
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    Yep, do the BB. Keep the bike running. Once you start replacing rings you run the risk of your stretched chain causing issues on the new chain ring & if you get a new chain, issues with the old cassette.

    Just make sure you get the correct width if it's a square taper. Nice thing is they do last a long time.

    Shimano UN55 Bottom Bracket | Jenson USA

  5. #5
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    The point about the stretched chain is a fair one, however if you really care about keeping the bike going then just accept that the drivetrain is close to shot. The cheap option then is a new BB, narrow-wide chainring, 9sp chain and cassette. That should all be possible for under $150 if you look around and give you many more years of service.

    I'm assuming here that the stock crankset allows you to swap chainrings out (i.e. not one of the cheap ones with riveted on chainrings) and doesn't have a bizarre BCD.

  6. #6
    KDS
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    Before you spend any money on the crankset and related parts, check to see if your current crank is covered under the Shimano recall. If it is the recalled model, you will get a new crankset, BB, chain, and front derailleur free of charge.

  7. #7
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    Buy a shimano deore or slx crankset with BB. They're cheap and if you get SLX or better, its probably the best crank on the market at any price.

    10 speed cranks work with 7-10 speed bikes, so no compatibility issues there.

  8. #8
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    From your original question, deore cranks are solid. I would look into what bcd your cranks have and how much a fitting narrow wide ring will cost. Just make sure everything will fit together before ordering a bunch of stuff.

  9. #9
    rode a bicycle once...
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    Awesome thanks for the replies everyone! I did check on that recall (KDS)... unfortunately the recall covers the Alivio FC-MC12 and mine is the MC10....grrr. Also it does have the crappy riveted on chain rings so I guess I'll have to just change out the whole thing which I really don't mind. The rings on there currently are just bent and broken up so I will definitely check out the SLX as well. I hope to get a Minnesota soon but like I said I just can't stand to see a bike sit still. Oh and here's a dumb question for everyone... what does 'BCD' stand for? I'm guessing the 'D' is diameter... I do have calipers and micrometers so I can measure accurately... do I measure from taper to taper on the spindle and then the width of the bottom bracket tube?

  10. #10
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    Bolt circle diameter, it shouldn't matter so much if you are buying new cranks

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by wyomad View Post
    I do have calipers and micrometers so I can measure accurately... do I measure from taper to taper on the spindle and then the width of the bottom bracket tube?
    Yes, for the BB. For the BCD, here'a guide: https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...e-diameter-bcd

  12. #12
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    Don't get the M6000, M7000 or others with the X shaped bolt pattern. Look for M590, M610, M670 with the standard 104mm bolt pattern.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/183148980669

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by wyomad View Post
    I hope to get a Minnesota soon but like I said I just can't stand to see a bike sit still.
    How soon? I get the idea of getting the bike running, but a Minnesota is only $600. If you're going to get it real soon, spending $150 or so on all of the recommendations doesn't seem to make much sense! All it does is effectively up the cost of a new bike by that amount.

  14. #14
    rode a bicycle once...
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    Hopefully sooner than later...dealing with a blown transmission on the Astro van at the moment so having to deal with that first. I'd like to get on a nicer bike again soon but unfortunately my ambition for riding outweighs my cash flow..

  15. #15
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    I got a crankset from Nashbar with a new BB for under $75. The mountain crankset has 3 rings and works great. I put it on a 2003 Giant Warp DS3.

  16. #16
    High Plains Luddite
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    Quote Originally Posted by wyomad View Post
    Also I know most people don't prefer the older bike rebuild vs just buying a new one...
    Most people? Maybe.

    But certainly not all. Rigid MTBs are still as fun as they always were.

    Good luck with your project.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Buy a shimano deore or slx crankset with BB. They're cheap and if you get SLX or better, its probably the best crank on the market at any price.

    10 speed cranks work with 7-10 speed bikes, so no compatibility issues there.

    They DO? Even with the thinner chain? This is what I'm not getting, isn't there a compatibility problem with a narrow-wide chainring and the 7-8 speed cogs in back (not sure about 9-speed). I'd love to go 1x8 with an 11-40t cassette but a crapload of people say that front 1x chainrings are simply not compatible with 7-8 speed cassettes, the chain will not shift correctly and will wear a lot faster. Is that wrong?

    BTW the Sunrace 11-40t also has a 9-speed cassette if the OP is wondering, but again can it be fine with a 10-11 speed chainring?
    Hypercritical is good. Hypocritical is bad. Nice people can still be bad people.

  18. #18
    RAKC Industries
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    Its not the cassettes that are the problem, Narrowide rings dont retain 7/8 speed chains so you have to go old school 1x system with chain retention.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Life on a bike doesn't begin till the sun goes down.


  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    Its not the cassettes that are the problem, Narrowide rings dont retain 7/8 speed chains so you have to go old school 1x system with chain retention.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

    From a different thread in 2014:

    kendalja
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    3x8 to 1 x8 conversion
    I confirmed with Raceface that their chainrings are comparable with 8 speed cassettes as long as you use an 8 speed chain.

    He meant compatible. So then, snipping out all but the most important stuff in the thread:
    Went with a surly ss 32t ring, BBG bash and N-gear chain stop.

    And then...he still tried the stock 8-speed chainring first anyway:
    Had a ton of issues with the stock chainring! I would drop it almost the entire trail. I have not ridden the new setup until tomorrow so hopefully the chain is not an issue. I will report back tomorrow. Wish me luck

    Rumblytumbly replied:
    I'm on 1x8 too. Ramped rings are the worst, can't go down the driveway without dropping the chain. Currently have an FSA singlespeed ring and just fine with no chainkeeper or bashring and old derailleur. Rarely drops.

    I assume he switched to the narrow-wide chainring for this post:
    No issues with dropping the chain today at all! I rode pretty hard also but also bit it pretty hard! Chain stayed on the entire time (wish I can say that about myself).


    So it does look like narrow-wide chainrings do retain 7/8 speed chains; whether the chain wears a lot faster is another story.
    Hypercritical is good. Hypocritical is bad. Nice people can still be bad people.

  20. #20
    RAKC Industries
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    Actually no, he was on a single speed ring. They have longer and slightly thicker teeth. That works for some, a single ride report though doesnt cover the whole picture. Narrow wide ring is better than stock rings. SS rings are how 1x was done before Narrow wide came to pass which was after 10 speed had been out for a while because SS rings back then sometimes didnt play nice with 10 speed chains. And for full suspension bikes chain retention was still needed or dropped chains was still a problem.

    I know from experience less than 9 speed chains work like total garbage on Narrow wide. My sons bikes as hes grown. He's 1x9 now and for the first time Im dont have any chain retention or dropped chain issues with a narrow wide ring.

    As I said IT WORKS but not near as good as 9+ speed chains.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Life on a bike doesn't begin till the sun goes down.


  21. #21
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    Congrats on bringing the old Trek back to life, I've done something similar with a solid 950 Singletrack. It's currently running 1X9 using a Kore narrow wide ring on a Zee chainset with no problems. Before that I initially built the bike using just the middle ring on a Shimano 960 chainset. Of coarse you will need to use out board bearings with either of these chainsets but the loss of 13oz in weight gave the steel frame much more spring.

  22. #22
    rode a bicycle once...
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    Ok so haven't gotten a new BB for the Trek yet, but rather than a new Minnesota, here's what I ended up with...what do you think? Seems like I should be able to get another, bigger front chainring on there however there's no derailleur in front. The lever on the left handlebar is for the seatpost (??) which I've never seen before. if youll notice, behind the right side crank arm on the chainstay there's like a 'fish gill' sort of rub... 3 consecutively. Is this from the crank arm flexing?

    replacement crankset for oldass Trek-img_0435.jpgreplacement crankset for oldass Trek-img_0436.jpg

  23. #23
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    Looks like a scratch from the chain hitting the seat stay during a crash or something. I would guess those marks would match up well against the chain.

  24. #24
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    SRAM GX. I suggest going 1x because it removes weight and complexity

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by VenomousDancer1234 View Post
    SRAM GX. I suggest going 1x because it removes weight and complexity
    For the Trek you mean?

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by wyomad View Post
    For the Trek you mean?
    yup

  27. #27
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    Ok so after carefully reading (and everyone correct me if I'm reading this wrong) I've got an 8 speed cassette and am probably just going to go 1x8 cuz hey.... easier. So RAKC mentioned that a narrow-wide may not work great on this setup.. and BLUFF mentioned that it works great on a 1x9, however I probably won't switch out the cassette for awhile, if at all. Am I looking at an SS chainring? Or like the older 2014 kendalja post should I go RF narrow-wide ring for 1x8 with an 8spd chain? And do I need and outboard bearing setup like BLUFF mentioned? Thanks for humoring this everyone..

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